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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Good Evening All,

I just bought a router for the first time and have a project for it, but now I just need to find the right bit.

I have 3/4in Bruce Hardwoods throughout my house, I need to install one last room to be finished with this project. However, I have hit a little snag. Why I did one of the bedrooms, I got very lucky and the grooved ends were all lined up and none were cut, so I was able to use a slip tongue instead of a transition slip from the hallway into the bedroom. On the other end of the hallway, where the current project bedroom is, the boards are all cut, so I need to route a groove to accept a slip tongue. The issue that I am finding is that all of the T&G bits are made for use on a table-mounted router and are not meant to be used handheld with the flooring already installed.

Does anyone have any experience with this or advice as to what bit to use?
 

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Table is far and away the best choice for T&G. If you do it hand held, it's really easy to slightly tip the router which messes up the tongue and/or groove. You can alleviate that by laying a second piece of your material parallel to the one you're cutting to support the router base.

Another thing would be an edge guide that will hold your router stable. Here's a picture of the Bosch unit, another of the DeWalt guide.
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
maybe a 1/4" slot cutter w/bearing? not sure what your slot size needs are, but you can make multiple passes or trim down your tongue...
that's a great idea. It needs to be a 1/4 tall x 1/4 deep so that may work. My only concern is the bearing, I would have to find one that rides on the top rather than sticking out from the bottom since the flooring is installed and I only have 1/4 from the bottom of the cut to the sub floor.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Table is far and away the best choice for T&G. If you do it hand held, it's really easy to slightly tip the router which messes up the tongue and/or groove. You can alleviate that by laying a second piece of your material parallel to the one you're cutting to support the router base.

Another thing would be an edge guide that will hold your router stable. Here's a picture of the Bosch unit, another of the DeWalt guide.
View attachment 400591 View attachment 400592
I completely understand that table is better, but since the flooring is already installed, I'm hesitant to try to take up a whole section of the board in the hallway just to be able to take them to the bench. I was planning on using another piece of scrap flooring on the other side of the opening, parallel as a counter section to set the router on to hopefully alleviate the tipping issue.

Will the edge guides work if I am routing on the edge of the board?
 

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I completely understand that table is better, but since the flooring is already installed, I'm hesitant to try to take up a whole section of the board in the hallway just to be able to take them to the bench. I was planning on using another piece of scrap flooring on the other side of the opening, parallel as a counter section to set the router on to hopefully alleviate the tipping issue.

Will the edge guides work if I am routing on the edge of the board?
It should, depending on how you set it up. The big thing is to avoid "tipping" the router by supporting the base rather than letting half float free. That spinning blade and angular momentum makes it hard not to fatigue or lose concentration, and have the slot "wander" and become unusable.
 

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If I'm reading this right the part that is already installed is cut square and the boards you want to install have a tongue on them, so they won't connect. If this is the case the fix is simple. Cut off the tongue and butt the boards together. This is the way it is normally done when two rooms meet and the flooring is laid in a different direction. A hallway leading into a bedroom would be a good example, If the boards could be laced together that would be the best way but that isn't always possible.
 

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Butt joints are used all the time, and with no problem. Here are a few examples of how a transition is normally accomplished, and another example of laying a boarder. In none of these is a spline used. It isn't used for two reasons. The first being that it just isn't needed. The second is that more damage could be done by attempting to put a groove in for a spline.


Bamboo Wood Flooring/Part 13/How to install No Threshold Perpendicular Flooring - YouTube

Installing Hardwood Floor Borders - YouTube

How to Add On to a Wood Floor Design with Border - YouTube
 

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Butt joints are used all the time, and with no problem. Here are a few examples of how a transition is normally accomplished, and another example of laying a boarder. In none of these is a spline used. It isn't used for two reasons. The first being that it just isn't needed. The second is that more damage could be done by attempting to put a groove in for a spline.


Bamboo Wood Flooring/Part 13/How to install No Threshold Perpendicular Flooring - YouTube

Installing Hardwood Floor Borders - YouTube

How to Add On to a Wood Floor Design with Border - YouTube
Flipping the tongue with hardwood flooring is a standard technique. Doesn’t involve cutting grooves and doesn’t involve butt joints. Jussayin’.


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Butt joints are used all the time, and with no problem. Here are a few examples of how a transition is normally accomplished, and another example of laying a boarder. In none of these is a spline used. It isn't used for two reasons. The first being that it just isn't needed. The second is that more damage could be done by attempting to put a groove in for a spline.


Bamboo Wood Flooring/Part 13/How to install No Threshold Perpendicular Flooring - YouTube

Installing Hardwood Floor Borders - YouTube

How to Add On to a Wood Floor Design with Border - YouTube
I guess I'm lucky that I work with guys who in tall hardwood floors...
 

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Either you or I am missing the point. Is part of the floor already installed? When talking about reversing direction I am talking about one floor going horizontal and the other going vertical. Is Jamma007 trying to install additional flooring that has a tongue on it to flooring that does not have a groove? If so, then good luck (especially for a non professional) to cut a groove/ slot into the existing floor. I would really like to see that slot when it reaches the wall. Maybe it could be cut with a chisel and an oscillating tool or maybe it could be cut with a kick saw or maybe it could just be only cut where it's easy to cut and then simply butt up the rest. Maybe if it was really necessary to have a slot then the guys in the above video doing boarders should be told that they are doing it wrong. The end tongue and groove help keep things lined up. A surface nail and adhesive will do the same thing.
 

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I won't argue the point I only hope the poster understands that the end groove is not necessary and that he doesn't try to somehow put a groove in the existing boards. I will leave this last video in hopes that it will help others understand how to do a floor repair in the real world.

 
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