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I won't argue the point I only hope the poster understands that the end groove is not necessary and that he doesn't try to somehow put a groove in the existing boards. I will leave this last video in hopes that it will help others understand how to do a floor repair in the real world.

Back to your post #12 . I wouldn't recommend butt jointing. I have the same issue considering putting addition hardwood in a beroom.. routing for a spline is the way I know to do it correctly..

Is it possible your talking about thin laminate flooring?
 

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I won't argue the point I only hope the poster understands that the end groove is not necessary and that he doesn't try to somehow put a groove in the existing boards. I will leave this last video in hopes that it will help others understand how to do a floor repair in the real world.

So, I’m really scratching my head here. Where in that video you posted does it say anything about butt joints ?


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Back to your post #12 . I wouldn't recommend butt jointing. I have the same issue considering putting addition hardwood in a beroom.. routing for a spline is the way I know to do it correctly..

Is it possible your talking about thin laminate flooring?
If he’s talking about vinyl or laminate flooring then yes, they have tongues/grooves on both ends. But then, he a) doesn’t understand the difference between hardwood flooring and laminate and b) who the hell routs laminate slats ??


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If he’s talking about vinyl or laminate flooring then yes, they have tongues/grooves on both ends. But then, he a) doesn’t understand the difference between hardwood flooring and laminate and b) who the hell routs laminate slats ??


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I guess you'll have to ask the one who brought it up..
 

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In this video (as well as the others) it is shown that end butt joints are used with 3/4" hardwood flooring without any attempt to cut a groove or tongue in them, In this video the board is simply cut to length and slid into the space between the existing boards. The existing boards have a tongue and groove cut on the sides to hold them tight together along their length. If you read the original post it seems like this is the problem that Jamma007 has, how to connect the ends of the new flooring to the ends of the old. The advice given to him was to somehow cut a groove in the flooring already laid in order to connect the yet unladed flooring that has the factory tongue on it. My advice was to cut the boards square and butt them together. By doing so he would not have to lace them together as shown in this repair video. An alternate way would be to cut the tongue off a long length of flooring and to butt the square edge up to the existing installed flooring and use this as a transition piece. Then continue installing the new boards as you normally would. The tongue ends of the new boards would slip into the existing groove on the transition board. This solution makes it easy to safely add on to the existing floor. The ideal solution would be to weave the two floors together to make it look perfect, but this is not what Jamma007 asked advice on doing. However, I will point out (as the video shows) he would still be cutting the newly added floors square and butting them together with the existing boards. So, in the end it's still a butt joint on the ends. As an aside, I will be adding a new to existing floor in the spring and will post pictures. It will not be possible to weave the two floors together because it is random width and difficult to get the existing width boards milled correctly. I will also show how I connected two floors going in different directions using the method I described.
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
Either you or I am missing the point. Is part of the floor already installed? When talking about reversing direction I am talking about one floor going horizontal and the other going vertical. Is Jamma007 trying to install additional flooring that has a tongue on it to flooring that does not have a groove? If so, then good luck (especially for a non professional) to cut a groove/ slot into the existing floor. I would really like to see that slot when it reaches the wall. Maybe it could be cut with a chisel and an oscillating tool or maybe it could be cut with a kick saw or maybe it could just be only cut where it's easy to cut and then simply butt up the rest. Maybe if it was really necessary to have a slot then the guys in the above video doing boarders should be told that they are doing it wrong. The end tongue and groove help keep things lined up. A surface nail and adhesive will do the same thing.

The flooring in the hallway is already installed and is existing. Its a combination of tongue and straight cuts that they made when they installed it. Im going to cut it back square just a bit to loose the tounges and I would like to put a slip tongue in to make sure that the boards stay flush over time. I have previously done a room where I just but joined them and the boards weren't perfectly flush. Since its already installed I can cut the slip tongue to length. The width is only as wide as a doorway, so I was only going to put the tongue in as far as I can route a groove and leave the rest to butt up since it will be along the door frame.

Heres a picture for reference. This is at the other end when I did the previous bedroom where I got lucky and the grooved edges all lined up. (this was a test fit of the cut before the underlayment was installed.

The issue with just a butt joint here is that there are many different boards that may move over time and start to come up. A slip tounge will help them all stay flush.

*I don't want to lace them into the hallway because the hallway is running along the floor joist instead of across them the way I have always been told it should be run in a room.

Brown Building Wood Fixture Flooring
 

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The issue with just a butt joint here is that there are many different boards that may move over time and start to come up. A slip tounge will help them all stay flush.

View attachment 400663
Put a threshold over the seam to hold it down ?

Or, if you’re absolutely adamant about milling into it - I personally, would’ve opted for either dowels or biscuits. Most likely biscuits.


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Your trim will cover a lot of small errors. And with wood, you still have to allow for expansion/contraction, especially in a humid location. So the trim becomes a hold down so you don't have to nail the edges down. Not sure how the pros do it, but with T&G or splines, I believe you only nail on one edge of each board, which allows a little forgiveness for expansion for each individual board at the joint. If you look at the sice view of T&G by Rebel, you can see there's a little space for expansion in both the spline and cut joint.

On end pieces, with T&G you could nail the wall side edge. I have a strong preference for using a screw since it would be out of sight, because it's easy to remove if something goes wrong.

Finally, make sure each piece is the same orientation, finish side up, or down, on each piece, or they won't line up properly when assembled. Don't ask me how I know this.
 

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Turned out nice...

When I did mine,I had never done raw hardwoods before, but worked around flooring buys all.the time and learned. Went all the way around and screwed the floor down. I decided on an angle using aces. 8-12" long. The salesman said many dont like the shorts because it makes a floor look too busy. In my case its oak and it's a busy looking wood anyway. I put a wide oak boarder around it to change it up and figured for door and fireplace tile. I used a Powernailer,sanded and finished my floor s in poly. I had never sanded before with a floor sander , but it turned out about 95% percent good with a ripple here and the and an occasional scratch in missed with the pc sander. Mine are about 17 year old now and getting close to needing refinished..
 
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