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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Thought I'd post some of my work in Sketchup.

This is the Kitchen Pantry I am preparing to build for DW.

I will posting the actual project in one of the other subforums.

I plan on using Oak 3/4" plywood for the carcass and 3/4" red oak for the face frame, raised panel doors and kick plate.

Any thoughts or tips are appreciated.

Would love to post the model so folks can take a closer look and provide more insight, not sure how to.

Roger
 

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welcome roger. I'd be a bit concerned about those tall skinny doors as they have a tendency to warp. I solved that problem for my pantry doors (4 of them) by getting standard 36" wide doors and ripping them down the middle. Because they are 1 3/8" thick, they haven't warped.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi Phil!

I'm intrigued by your suggestion, hoping you can clarify it for me. Not sure how it would work.

I have a 33" wide constraint between the end of the existing counter top (with drawer set) and the wall.
 

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I built a very similar pantry over 20 years ago. I wasn't into raised panels yet, so I used 1/4 oak ply for the panels. The sides of mine are also plywood panels in solid frames. Since then it's been used as a pantry, an entertainment center, and lately as storage for my corded power tools. The doors do tend to warp a tiny bit seasonally, but magnetic catches on both top and bottom are able to pull the warp out and they close well. However, my 1/4 ply panels are much lighter than yours and don't bring any warp of their own to the party.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Don,

Thanks for the thoughtful response.

I've never done raised panels (yet), but I was under the impression that since the panels float in the frame, any seasonal humidity changes would be accounted for.

I've planned to leave about 1/8" space around each side of the floating panels, and install Panalign spacers (considered Space Balls briefly) to minimize any chatter in the panels.

P.S. Great username!!!

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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In lumber the growth rings closer to the outside of the tree are longer than the inner ones. When they soak up humidity they stretch farther than the inner ones because there are more wood cells soaking it up. Thats why you want to alternate grain when laminating the panel together, one board with the curves up, the next with the curves down. This will help but it doesn't always eliminate it completely. Using true vertical grain will pretty much eliminate it because all the growth ring layers are the same length but vertical grain can be hard to come by and it is always more money.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
In lumber the growth rings closer to the outside of the tree are longer than the inner ones. When they soak up humidity they stretch farther than the inner ones because there are more wood cells soaking it up. Thats why you want to alternate grain when laminating the panel together, one board with the curves up, the next with the curves down. This will help but it doesn't always eliminate it completely. Using true vertical grain will pretty much eliminate it because all the growth ring layers are the same length but vertical grain can be hard to come by and it is always more money.
Chuck,

I was thinking to use solid pieces for the raised panels rather than laminating smaller pieces together. Do solid panels present a problem outside of $$$?
 

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If you mean using something like a 1 by 12 instead then it will be more prone to warpage than a laminated panel where you can alternate grain direction. This issue is why so many woodworkers choose to use plywood panels instead. They are way more likely to stay flat and expansion/contraction cycles are almost non existent.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
If you mean using something like a 1 by 12 instead then it will be more prone to warpage than a laminated panel where you can alternate grain direction. This issue is why so many woodworkers choose to use plywood panels instead. They are way more likely to stay flat and expansion/contraction cycles are almost non existent.
Chuck,

Great info! I guess after watching dozens of videos on YouTube I assumed it would be a solid piece. All the demos showed the operator grabbing a giant, honking solid slab (so it seemed anyway) and putting it o the router table (or shaper) with the proper bit, speed, several passes, etc.

So........

I took a closer look at my kitchen cabinets (photos below) and noticed that the raised panels ARE laminated pieces as you have suggested. Again, thank you!

I don't think I can use MDF or plywood as I am staining to match the existing cabinetry. To your point, every reference I can find clearly indicates that either MDF or plywood is FAR MORE stable in terms of warpage, etc.

Is there something I am missing on these photos, or are these cabinet raised panels something other than laminated oak pieces? (i.e. I don't believe these are MDF or Plywood somehow treated cosmetically)

If these are laminated pieces, as I believe they are, I'm thinking to laminate 3" to 4" pieces together, alternating the grain direction then cut to final size. Also, been looking for reasons to crack out the Biscuit Jointer, any reason I couldn't use it between the joints before glue up?

This link seems to describe several methods....

Saving me tons of grief so far, I look forward to any other thoughts!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thank you Jim & Allen. The initial attempt took several hours, but now I think I cold draw this in 20-30 minutes, maybe less.

The most challenging aspect was the center rail, pictured below.

Again, huge kudos to the helpful YouTube videos on door rails and stiles.
 

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The only other thing that can imitate wood is a vinyl coating like you see on the cheap stuff. That's obviously real wood in your photos.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Chuck,

Thank you for taking a look, I appreciate your thoughts.

I was wondering if I was missing something.


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