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OK......the sign guru, Eric Rhoten, says it's too labor intensive to laminate Cedar fence pickets into a larger sign blank.

Well, I recently picked up a bunch of Cedar fence pickets from a fallen fence that wasn't very old. Good looking boards with only a few nail holes in each. So I ran them all through my planer to clean them up. The reclaimed wood was beautiful! They all cleaned up to 7/16" thickness. And they are all flat. No cupping or bowing or warping. I managed to get about 8 pieces, each 5" X 24" inches long, as well as quite a few that were shorter in length but very usable. I also used my edge trimming bit to get smooth flat edges on both sides for gluing on the long boards.

I have a sign I want to make and I want to use these boards. So I'm going to laminate them together.....against Eric's teachings. I'm hardheaded like that! LOL

I'm pretty sure I will attach a backer board to ensure there is no warping or bowing of the Cedar boards after I'm finished. Not sure if I will glue and screw the backer board to the Cedar.....of if I will just glue it to the Cedar boards. If I glue and screw them together, I will attach the backer board after I carve the sign so I don't take a chance of hitting a screw with my bits.

My question is have any of you done this? I know the boards are too thin for dowels or bisquits. So I'm hoping edge laminating will work. I do plan on using my cauls and clamps to help with the alignment and glue up.

Any suggestions or comments? I'm gonna do this....so don't tell me it won't work......I won't hear you if you say that. LOL
 
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tongue and groove them and put the panel in a dadoed frame...
skip the full backer and go w/ inlayed 1½'' wide perpendicular furring made from the pickets installed 6''OC...
no glue but do screw them on and slot the cross pieces for the screws to allow for wood movement..
be careful not to make your panels while the MC is elevated..
 

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Thanks Stick.

My moisture content is about 6% to 7% right now. That's about as low as I can get them to here on the Gulf coast.

I had thought about the inlay process but wasn't sure it would work. I'll do them as a half lap so the back is flat. Since the furs would be thin (about 7/32" thick) should I look at putting in maybe 3 rows rather than 2 rows of them?
 
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Do like Stick says, don't try to restrict the expansion or contraction. put the screws in little slots from the bacck sideto allow movement of the face.
But I should still laminate the edges, right?
 
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Thanks Stick.

My moisture content is about 6% to 7% right now. That's about as low as I can get them to here on the Gulf coast.

I had thought about the inlay process but wasn't sure it would work. I'll do them as a half lap so the back is flat. Since the furs would be thin (about 7/32" thick) should I look at putting in maybe 3 rows rather than 2 rows of them?
6-7% MC is great...
use the full thickness of the slat for the furring.....
inlay all of an eighth inch and the dado a bit loose..
nothing stopping you from adding more furring.. install furring on the ends of end grain......
the frame is for aesthetics and wood movement camo...
a ship lap will be more prone to open at the seams and the edges may curl/split...
an offset T&G will leave more wood to your favor...
less issues w/ the T&G...
 
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I was thinking gluing the flat edges. But now I will buy me a T&G bit set and give it a go.

But I'm still a little confused on the "use the full thickness of the slat for the furring.....inlay all of an eighth inch and the dado a bit loose.."

If I envision this correctly, I will cut a tongue and groove on the edges, glue and clamp them. Then I will cut three 1/8" deep dado from top to bottom, slightly wider than my fur strips. Then I lay the fur strips into these dados and fasten with a screw in a slotted hole into each of the laminated boards....no glue, just the screws.

Am I "seeing" this correctly?
 
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1... I was thinking gluing the flat edges.
2... But now I will buy me a T&G bit set and give it a go.
3... But I'm still a little confused on the "use the full thickness of the slat for the furring.....
4... inlay all of an eighth inch and the dado a bit loose.."
5... If I envision this correctly, I will cut a tongue and groove on the edges,
6... glue and clamp them.
7... Then I will cut three 1/8" deep dado from top to bottom, slightly wider than my fur strips.
8... Then I lay the fur strips into these dadoes and fasten with a screw in a slotted hole into each of the laminated boards....no glue, just the screws.

Am I "seeing" this correctly?
almost...

1... got it...
2... good... make it an adjustable set...
3... what ever your finished thickness of the slats is now leave then that thickness ans make your furring strips fron them...
4... cut the dadoes an eighth of an inch deep in the back of the panel and a playing card or two too wide..
you want free movement on the joints.. a snug or tight fit will bind...
5... correct... slightly off center towards the back of the panel...
6... no glue... clamp and caul then to make your dadoes...
7... correct...
8... correct..
two screws... place one each about ¼ of the width of the panel boards in from the edge of the panel seam/joint and centered in the furring strip...
 
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If you t & g the edge joints and the joints run horizontal remember to orient the board so that the tongues point up into the grooves, otherwise you are creating a water trap.
 

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Frank; nobody here is going to try and talk you out of re-purposing perfectly good Cedar! Nice find.
When you make the sign(s), ensure that the tongues are pointing UP! If you reverse it there's always the possibility of rain working it's way DOWN into the groove. This is not desirable.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Thanks everyone for the input.....especially you Stick, for your patience with this old man.

I also see I need to invest in a router table, too. Or maybe build myself one. Hmmmmm
 

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Frank I edge glued two pieces of WC together for another project about two months ago. So far there has been no cupping. I could be just lucky or they may just not cup that much. I don't know.
 

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If you t & g the edge joints and the joints run horizontal remember to orient the board so that the tongues point up into the grooves, otherwise you are creating a water trap.
or make the T&G's vertical...
 

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Thanks everyone for the input.....especially you Stick, for your patience with this old man.

I also see I need to invest in a router table, too. Or maybe build myself one. Hmmmmm
yur welcome...
RT's, we can delve into that too...

for now cut your T&G's on the TS...
Use an FTG blade..
 

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4... cut the dadoes an eighth of an inch deep in the back of the panel and a playing card or two too wide..
you want free movement on the joints.. a snug or tight fit will bind...

6... no glue... clamp and caul then to make your dadoes...
..
Notes...
you can always cut your dadoes in individual pieces and not as a panel..
you can size the end grain to help control checking and cracking...
watch your grain lay up for the most stable wood movement.....
kant the long edge of the tongue a schosh before assembly..
makes for easier assembly and checks edge splintering...
use truss headed or modified truss screws to attach the furring and not flat-head screws..
counter bore if required for the heads...
they hold better and aren't prone to split the wood like a FH screw...
 

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