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Discussion Starter · #61 ·
Lots of ways to skin a cat bud,, lots of ways... some just work and some don't...keeps it interesting to say the least.. :)

I feel a little embarrassed that I didn't pick up on that all by myself. Deco Splines!
What a concept. Spicing up the appearance and sturdiness in the same swoop, sure is synergy in that...:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #62 ·
BigJimAK who?? who dat?? :)

thank ya brother for the kind words...

How goes the education? You got a slopping forehead yet? You get a few free minutes, drop me a note on your thoughts about the LV Router plane...

Ole wbh1963 up there is a Neander in the making.. Someday we will rule the world!!!!

Man, Bill, those are AWESOME!
 

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Thanks for tossing back far more details than I can digest with a quick read!

I haven't used a electric jointer or thickness planer yet. Odds are my next power tool purchase will be a thickness planer. I have done just enough research on the topic to be aware of 'snipe' in concept and the need to avoid it when and where possible.

Most all of my jointing is on stock thinner than 3/4 and a number 6 fore plane does such a good job at it, I don't feel like I have the 'floor space' for an electric jointer, though I do have the urge to at least try jointing on a router table.

On the topic of 'pocket planes', I would inquire, How big are your pockets? I think of my itty bitty Stanley 101 as a pocket plane, and the widget is far more useful than the modest price suggests it should be (less than 10 bucks everywhere!).

I have really high hopes that 'shooting miters' will become second nature for me, which of course suggests that I need to get off my tail and build up the 'donkey's ear shooting board contraption'.

Long term, on Rabbets, I kind of envision using my RAS to rough em out and tuning them up with which ever plane seems best for the combination of "size/shape of the workpiece & size/shape of the rabbet. A .125" x .125" x 60" rabbet has different dynamics than say a .75 x 3.5" x 3.5" does...:)

The only good thing I have to say about my knowledge of sanding is I understand and respect the fact that it is it's own science....:)

Bill...

Hmmmmm says I... actually a good question from a Neander like yourself *L*..

At first, I hate to admit, very little hand plane effort went into my box making. BUT as time progressed and my skills with hand tools improved I found that the use of hand tools in many cases was just as good as anything with a plug. I started with milling by use of a 6" jointer then off to a 13" planer and finished off with a few passes under a 16/32 drum sander. (were going several years back keep in mind) Once I got the hand tool bug I began jointing/planing with hand planes..Once you learn how to do it well, its kinda like...its cool..done by hand and all, BUT..boy is burning a few electrons quicker. So any more, most of my mill work is done by equipment and tweaked by hand. I keep my #3 and my pocket plane's within arms reach at all times. The little pocket plane is perhaps the handiest tool in the shed!!! I love that thing for 'tweaking'...

Miters are all done on a shooting board with a LV BU Jack...
Rabbets are 'tweaked' with a LN rabbet block plane (recent purchse) Primary cuts done on the router table...
Delicate round overs done by hand, larger round overs done on the router table..
Bevels.......all depends.......if not done by hand plane, usually finsihed off with one...
Most finish work is touched up with card scrappers, dry sanded down to 400 then depending on the wood, wet sanded down to 1200....
 

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Discussion Starter · #65 ·
Thanks for tossing back far more details than I can digest with a quick read!

My apologies, don't usually say to much, but every now and then I get on a roll and ramble on.. *L*

I haven't used a electric jointer or thickness planer yet. Odds are my next power tool purchase will be a thickness planer. I have done just enough research on the topic to be aware of 'snipe' in concept and the need to avoid it when and where possible.

The two big advantages to having a thickness planer IMHO are, the ability to buy rough stock and mill multiple boards to a 'consistent' thickness. Rough cut is so much more affordable than ready milled that in the long term it pays for itself (the more volume, the quicker the payback). My experiences with big box wood has been that the boards can vary as much as an 1/8th inch in widths and a 1/16th in thickness. Doesn't sound like much, but that translates into alot of sanding not to mention aggravation. I use a 13" Craftsman planer. The unit never really reviewed that well and has required a few repairs over the years, but all in all, it produces a fantastic finish. Completely unexpected I might add. As for snipe..can be a issue with most planers, especially older units. The newer units, especially the Dewalt have miniimized if not eliminated it altogether. I just compensate for it...by allowing for the sniipe by adding a few extra inches to the length of the board...

Most all of my jointing is on stock thinner than 3/4 and a number 6 fore plane does such a good job at it, I don't feel like I have the 'floor space' for an electric jointer, though I do have the urge to at least try jointing on a router table.

On the topic of 'pocket planes', I would inquire, How big are your pockets? I think of my itty bitty Stanley 101 as a pocket plane, and the widget is far more useful than the modest price suggests it should be (less than 10 bucks everywhere!).

My pocket plane is actually called by LV an "Apron Plane"..

5 1/2 long by 1 3/4 wide...

Veritas® Apron Plane - Lee Valley Tools



I have really high hopes that 'shooting miters' will become second nature for me, which of course suggests that I need to get off my tail and build up the 'donkey's ear shooting board contraption'.



Long term, on Rabbets, I kind of envision using my RAS to rough em out and thttp://www.routerforums.com/images/rf_new/editor/color.gifuning them up with which ever plane seems best for the combination of "size/shape of the workpiece & size/shape of the rabbet. A .125" x .125" x 60" rabbet has different dynamics than say a .75 x 3.5" x 3.5" does...:)

The only good thing I have to say about my knowledge of sanding is I understand and respect the fact that it is it's own science....:)
Ohhhhhhhhh man, sanding and finishing....you're absolutely right,,,a science unto itself. The one thing I think most can agree on is the use of a sanding sealer. I've found this stuff by Charles Neil to be excellent..

https://charlesneilwoodworking.3dca...e-Color-Conditioner--Blotch-Control_p_47.html
 

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Great designs and brilliantly made. How about some photo-shoots of future boxes.
 

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Hi Bill,

Just now found this thread and was blown away by the excellence of craftsmanship in those boxes. Of course we have come to expect nothing less than excellence from you :yes2:

Just goes to show what can be done with cordless tools :)

Nice work and thanks for sharing.
 

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My pocket plane is actually called by LV an "Apron Plane".
5 1/2 long by 1 3/4 wide...


Veritas® Apron Plane - Lee Valley Tools
Thanks for the 'detail' and of course the speed link off to even *more* details!

I snagged a modern clone version of the time tested Stanley 60 from my local 'blue box'. It is very similar in design to the 'Veritas Apron Plane', the most notable exception being, the angle the iron is bedded at.

The 'perfectionist' side of my brain is thinking I should have waited till I found the Veritas version, yet all the same it was still a good purchase and the widget is 'earning it's keep'...:)

With so many awesome products in their offering, it remains impossible for me to predict which of them will be my first, thought the LV BU Jack still has the lead!.
 

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Discussion Starter · #71 ·
Thank you very much Harry...appreciate the kind words...

as for a photo shot... I've given it some consideration..right now, I have 3 half way completed. 1 big project and a couple small ones before I can start on anything new..however, I did see what is called a "Bombe" box at charles neils site yesterday and they really grabbed my attention... so I just might....

Great designs and brilliantly made. How about some photo-shoots of future boxes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #74 ·
Kind words indeed Bob... thank you very much :)

No so sure about the excellence thing, but I keep workin' at it.


Hi Bill,

Just now found this thread and was blown away by the excellence of craftsmanship in those boxes. Of course we have come to expect nothing less than excellence from you :yes2:

Just goes to show what can be done with cordless tools :)

Nice work and thanks for sharing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #75 ·
Hey bill...

as long as the 'widget' earns its keep, its all good!! :) :) :)

IMHO you can't go wrong with the BU jack....she's a beauty.. I would pick up at least one additional iron to go with it. Another great thing about the LV line is the
interchangeability of irons within the BU line....


Thanks for the 'detail' and of course the speed link off to even *more* details!

I snagged a modern clone version of the time tested Stanley 60 from my local 'blue box'. It is very similar in design to the 'Veritas Apron Plane', the most notable exception being, the angle the iron is bedded at.

The 'perfectionist' side of my brain is thinking I should have waited till I found the Veritas version, yet all the same it was still a good purchase and the widget is 'earning it's keep'...:)

With so many awesome products in their offering, it remains impossible for me to predict which of them will be my first, thought the LV BU Jack still has the lead!.
 

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The two big advantages to having a thickness planer IMHO are, the ability to buy rough stock and mill multiple boards to a 'consistent' thickness.

Rough cut is so much more affordable than ready milled that in the long term it pays for itself (the more volume, the quicker the payback).

My experiences with big box wood has been that the boards can vary as much as an 1/8th inch in widths and a 1/16th in thickness.

Doesn't sound like much, but that translates into alot of sanding not to mention aggravation.
I do prefer to buy my wood in the rough, especially the cedar. Dressed and surfaced cedar costs between 4 and 8 times more than the 'rough stuff'. 35 cents a square foot sure seems a lot less expensive than 2.80 a square foot to me!.

I haven't bought a single board foot of dressed cedar from the big boxes, because I put my digital calipers to good use right there in the store! They discovered variances just like you described, Not only from board to board, but on the same board.

I use a 13" Craftsman planer. The unit never really reviewed that well and has required a few repairs over the years, but all in all, it produces a fantastic finish.
Completely unexpected I might add.
Hearing that you have been using a 'retail' planer and the same one over an extended period of time is encouraging!. I don't know if I am being too paranoid or not cautious enough when trying to select one for myself. Perhaps I should seek out someone who has one, maybe through a local woodworking club and get some hands on experience with the machine relative to they type of wood I want to run through it.


As for snipe..can be a issue with most planers, especially older units. The newer units, especially the Dewalt have miniimized if not eliminated it altogether.

I just compensate for it...by allowing for the sniipe by adding a few extra inches to the length of the board...
A great example of 'flowing' with the challenges...:) Some would invest millions in an attempt to defy the laws of physics, while others would consider the 'true cost' of them in this aspect and save a ton of time by simply paying the toll!
 

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Discussion Starter · #80 ·
Hey Chris,,, I've got a Grainger box full of scraps that I should just blame on you :)

But then again,,, thats always been half the fun... working at it til I get it close to being right......

Birdseye Maple is some beautiful stuff....best of luck with it..
 
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