Router Forums banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
901 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So I designed a wooden stand for my lathe to replace the flimsy lightweight metal stand that I've suffered with for the past 25 years. But I don't want to make a silly mistake that will come back to bite me later on. For example, I've seen some lathes mounted on tables that are so wide that the table would interfere with the lathe tool, especially when working from the back side when hollowing a bowl. OK, I thought of that one, but what did I miss?

The trestle will sit 4" off the floor on locking casters, which are not shown. These will raise the spindle to 42 inches off the floor, which is about my elbow height.

The trestle itself will be made from 2X6 and 2X4 Yellow Pine to save cost. The chest of drawers and drawer fronts will be made from 3/4 Oak ply I already have on hand.

I plan to mortise/tenon the uprights into the top and bottom. The chest of drawers will not add significant strength, only weight. But the racking forces on a lathe stand are minimal anyway. Sometimes I forget to lock the casters on my existing stand, but it rarely moves.

I'm thinking of filling the void between the bottom stringers with sand to add more weight to dampen vibration more.

Thanks for looking.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
232 Posts
I like it!
I need to build a new stand for my lathe also, the one I have was built to Nova's specs, but it is poorly designed and therefore "tippy". This is a real problem when I move the lathe. So my concern is, do you think the 18 1/2" wide feet will prevent the lathe from tipping over? My current one is 13" wide. What is the metal rod between the pedestals for? Are you going to slope the top, underneath the ways to help with DC/clean-up? This something I am trying to figure out, because a sloped top will affect the drawer depth and I want as much storage I can get. I am looking forward to seeing your final solution.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
901 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
So my concern is, do you think the 18 1/2" wide feet will prevent the lathe from tipping over? My current one is 13" wide. What is the metal rod between the pedestals for? Are you going to slope the top, underneath the ways to help with DC/clean-up? This something I am trying to figure out, because a sloped top will affect the drawer depth and I want as much storage I can get. I am looking forward to seeing your final solution.
1. My current stand is the angle iron stand that came with the lathe. The legs are 18" apart at the bottom, tapering to 6" apart at the top. I have each leg sitting in the cup of a small 3-wheel caster. I'm careful when moving it, but even with the very small caster wheels, haven't had a problem with tippyness. That's how I came up with the width of the feet.

2. The metal rod is a "bar rail" to rest a foot on. It's something I always wished for on my current setup.

3. I unless I leave the top that the lathe sits on open in the center, like my current stand, there's nowhere for the chips to go. Even if I leave the center open, then I'd have to drop the top of the chest of drawers like you said. My plan is to vacuum the chips out from between the bed rails when they build up high enough to interfere with movement of the tool rest.

4. Details of the Chest of Drawers are not shown on the drawing, but I'll only be using 10" full extension slides. If the drawers are longer front-to-back, I'm afraid they'll interfere with the handle of the lathe tool.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Bob Adams

·
Registered
Joined
·
813 Posts
Andy, Your plan for the stand looks very well thought out. As far as wheels, consider the point where the wheels contact the floor to determine if they will be tipsy. In other words does the 3 wheel version you are using now fall outside of where the new version will be? It also looks like you could easily add a sliding dust port to the back side if needed latter on. If you want to get fancy, you could concave the top to match the arch in the lathe to make vacuuming easier. I like your design!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
901 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Andy, Your plan for the stand looks very well thought out. As far as wheels, consider the point where the wheels contact the floor to determine if they will be tipsy. In other words does the 3 wheel version you are using now fall outside of where the new version will be? It also looks like you could easily add a sliding dust port to the back side if needed latter on. If you want to get fancy, you could concave the top to match the arch in the lathe to make vacuuming easier. I like your design!
I will put the big casters as far outboard on the trestle feet as practical. But given the larger spin circle of the new casters, they will inevitably be inboard about 2 inches when moving sideways. I could lengthen the feet to compensate, but I'm afraid they'll get in the way of MY feet.
 

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
16,385 Posts
I have a very good book on turning by Aussie Mike Darlow. He says in the book that weight added to the stand does help reduce vibration. He said he`s seen things like bags of cement added to the metal stands and one person poured a large block of cement and attached hos lathe to it. The sand is good if you can add enough of it. Both sand and wood are good at absorbing vibration. The heavier the better I would say so if a few patio stones are heavier than the sand then I might use them instead (you also wouldn't have to worry about leaks). The weight will be mostly down low so that will help keep the center of gravity between the casters.

If you think chip buildup might be a problem then slope the section between the bed mounts and make it slippery. I like the idea of the foot rail. That's a back saver.

I think you have the feet on the stand too close together. If you look at the drawing and imagine yourself standing at either end of the bed, one of your feet will hit either foot on the stand. I would extend the bottom rails at least as long as the entire lathe. Even then you may have to cramp your stance at times. The longer bottom rails will allow you to widen the stance on it too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
901 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
I have a very good book on turning by Aussie Mike Darlow. He says in the book that weight added to the stand does help reduce vibration. He said he`s seen things like bags of cement added to the metal stands and one person poured a large block of cement and attached hos lathe to it. The sand is good if you can add enough of it. Both sand and wood are good at absorbing vibration. The heavier the better I would say so if a few patio stones are heavier than the sand then I might use them instead (you also wouldn't have to worry about leaks). The weight will be mostly down low so that will help keep the center of gravity between the casters.

If you think chip buildup might be a problem then slope the section between the bed mounts and make it slippery. I like the idea of the foot rail. That's a back saver.

I think you have the feet on the stand too close together. If you look at the drawing and imagine yourself standing at either end of the bed, one of your feet will hit either foot on the stand. I would extend the bottom rails at least as long as the entire lathe. Even then you may have to cramp your stance at times. The longer bottom rails will allow you to widen the stance on it too.
I'll probably add the sand to move the center of gravity downward. My lathe is actually shorter than the one pictured and a little narrower too, but that was the best I could find already drawn in Sketchup 3D Warehouse. I sized the trestle according to my lathe, so the usable portion of the bed falls between the feet. However, there's really no downside to stretching them out a little more. Moving them lengthwise will keep them out of the way and allow me to stretch the feet width-wise too. Good Call, Thanks.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Cherryville Chuck

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
19,238 Posts
A couple of things about this wonderful design. First I agree that adding weight, lots of weight, low on the bench, will make this more stable and absorb vibration. However, that foot rest will be something like 5 1/2 inches high and only about 4 inches from the vertical supports, which means it will hit you near the ball of your foot. That doesn't sound very comfortable. Perhaps you could mount the bar below the base and further out.

Another point. Even with double locked casters (swivel and wheel locked) your foot on that bar is likely to make the base move. So I'd go with two fixed casters under the heaviest end and the best quality swivels on the other end. Still easily moved, but more stability. Four swivels will likely be a bit less stable wheel base, and with all that weight on top, the center of gravity will constantly be shifting as much as several inches as you move it around.

Consider the possibility of making the outriggers at the base much higher, and cutting away space to recess the casters so you have maybe an inch of clearance between the floor and base and the caster projecting down an inch instead of the whole caster height. That way your foot rest and the center of gravity, can be lower.

This is a terrific design. Thanks for sharing it. Looking forward to seeing the finished piece.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,625 Posts
Nice design...regarding the foot rail, will it be high enough such that your other foot will fit underneath...? Otherwise you may be transferring your weight onto the rail...? Your back might complain. :)

Have you considered tool holders on the sides...?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
901 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Nice design...regarding the foot rail, will it be high enough such that your other foot will fit underneath...? Otherwise you may be transferring your weight onto the rail...? Your back might complain. :)

Have you considered tool holders on the sides...?
I figure many generations of evolution have perfected the height of a standard bar rail. I looked up the distance from the floor, which is 6 inches to the top of the rail. That leaves 4 inches under the rail, which is toe-kick height for cabinets.

I considered tool holders on the side, but I need to see the cutting edges to choose a tool.
 

·
Registered
Theo
Joined
·
6,930 Posts
Back when I got my lathe I made the stand for it. Not sure if I used 1/2" or 3/4" plywood, but likely 1/2", as that is what I usually use. I wen thru my 'build' folder, and the two picture below are the best I have of it, the others show only small portions of it. All Zen woodworking, no plans (didn't need no steenkin' plans), just went out and made it. And not a clue how I did it. No extra weight to cut down vibration, because there was absolutely no vibration, ever. I apparently put the shelf in to put weight on if needed, and for bracing. And to hold stuff. However I did it, it worked like a champ. I made a 'table' that fit over the lathe, to make an extra work surface, very handy. I sold the lathe long ago, all I liked to make where carving mallets, and after a dozen or so decided I didn't need more. Oh yes, if I wanted to move it, very easy to just shift it around to where I wanted to go - had planned on wheels at first, but decided no need, and I was right.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
901 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
A couple of things about this wonderful design. First I agree that adding weight, lots of weight, low on the bench, will make this more stable and absorb vibration. However, that foot rest will be something like 5 1/2 inches high and only about 4 inches from the vertical supports, which means it will hit you near the ball of your foot. That doesn't sound very comfortable. Perhaps you could mount the bar below the base and further out.

Another point. Even with double locked casters (swivel and wheel locked) your foot on that bar is likely to make the base move. So I'd go with two fixed casters under the heaviest end and the best quality swivels on the other end. Still easily moved, but more stability. Four swivels will likely be a bit less stable wheel base, and with all that weight on top, the center of gravity will constantly be shifting as much as several inches as you move it around.

Consider the possibility of making the outriggers at the base much higher, and cutting away space to recess the casters so you have maybe an inch of clearance between the floor and base and the caster projecting down an inch instead of the whole caster height. That way your foot rest and the center of gravity, can be lower.

This is a terrific design. Thanks for sharing it. Looking forward to seeing the finished piece.
Thanks for the kind words.
I'm going to move the verticals farther apart and lengthen the feet. I want about 4 inches of toe space under the bar rail. Think of a toe kick under a counter. With the lengthened trestle feet, I'll have more room to get the arch of my foot on the rail.

I like the idea of fixed casters on the motor end. That would eliminate tip-over problems because the lathe will never be pushed sideways.

Thanks to all for your well-considered advice.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top