Router Forums banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I last did woodwork in school way to many years ago so know nothing. I work with marble, cutting pieces down to 10mm (3/8") and 5mm (3/16") now so am fairly confident with my hands.

I want to start making some panels for use in kits and need to get a rough idea of what i'm letting myself in for.

The panels I've in mind will only be about 20cm (8") across to 35cm (12") across but the main thing is I need to be able to create a recess of 5mm. I've attached a photo of the sort of thing I want to make.

Is making the recess and getting the nice wavy bits on the edge fairly easy to learn? Would I need to invest a lot of money in a router? I was looking at the Dremel Trio tool, would this be up to it? It won't be massive production but I'd look to create about 20 at a time.

Thanks
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
A router is exactly the tool for this kind of work. A plunge router would make it a lot easier, and making an oversized base (probably out of plexiglas so you could see what you're doing) would let you maintain control over a cut as wide as you are contemplating. Skis (see another thread on this site) could also do it.
No, you don't need something very expensive, but I think the Dremel won't not be up to it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,886 Posts
Yes a router is the way to go. What you will need to do (and this is not based on your actual size) is first cut a length of 3/4" thick mdf 4 feet long. Then on one edge using a roman ogee bit make your profile. Then on the other edge with a 1/2" rabbeting bit make your cut for the recess. Now take it to the miter saw and and make the necessary cuts. Here is a link to making those cuts. Shopsmith's Woodshop Tips cutting accurate miters will be the toughest part of this operation so be sure to use a stop block so that each piece is the exact same size. Once you have the first one figured out the rest will go quickly.
 

·
Premium Member
Retired since June 2000
Joined
·
15,065 Posts
I last did woodwork in school way to many years ago so know nothing. I work with marble, cutting pieces down to 10mm (3/8") and 5mm (3/16") now so am fairly confident with my hands.

I want to start making some panels for use in kits and need to get a rough idea of what i'm letting myself in for.

The panels I've in mind will only be about 20cm (8") across to 35cm (12") across but the main thing is I need to be able to create a recess of 5mm. I've attached a photo of the sort of thing I want to make.

Is making the recess and getting the nice wavy bits on the edge fairly easy to learn? Would I need to invest a lot of money in a router? I was looking at the Dremel Trio tool, would this be up to it? It won't be massive production but I'd look to create about 20 at a time.

Thanks
Firstly, the dremel, as handy as it is, isn't intended for that kind of routing. Personally I would make it in two parts, the main tray and the raised part and glue them together, this will save a great deal of routing. The octagonal shapes are best cut by saw. The edge of the main base would normally have it's edge treatment routed on a router table, although it can be done with the hand held router so long as the tray is secured to the bench. The smaller octagonal raised part once cut to shape then should be fitted into a box of suitable size and a template made which sits on top of the material. The formula for calculating the internal size of the opening in the template is:
template guide diameter minus bit diameter plus size of finished opening.
Let us say that the size between flats is 10" and we use a 1" template guide and a 1/4" bit, then: 1"-.25"+10"=10 3/4". Sure, the corners will be radiused but these can be quickly squared with a corner chisel. The way to make an accurate template is to glue seperate parts together, similar to the photo., and as a mosaic expert this should not present a problem to you.
Hopefully these shots from previous projects will give you an idea of what I''ve been attempting to explain. Don't hesitate to ask further questions.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Make the coaster in two sections with the top out of 5mm MDF. If working from largest coaster the inner "waste" could be suitable for the next smaller top. I think a Dremel could handle that and if doing multiples a simple jig could be set up. By doing the coaster in two pieces you can also vary the outline to make unique patterns.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Firstly, the dremel, as handy as it is, isn't intended for that kind of routing. Personally I would make it in two parts, the main tray and the raised part and glue them together, this will save a great deal of routing. The octagonal shapes are best cut by saw. The edge of the main base would normally have it's edge treatment routed on a router table, although it can be done with the hand held router so long as the tray is secured to the bench. The smaller octagonal raised part once cut to shape then should be fitted into a box of suitable size and a template made which sits on top of the material. The formula for calculating the internal size of the opening in the template is:
template guide diameter minus bit diameter plus size of finished opening.
Let us say that the size between flats is 10" and we use a 1" template guide and a 1/4" bit, then: 1"-.25"+10"=10 3/4". Sure, the corners will be radiused but these can be quickly squared with a corner chisel. The way to make an accurate template is to glue seperate parts together, similar to the photo., and as a mosaic expert this should not present a problem to you.
Hopefully these shots from previous projects will give you an idea of what I''ve been attempting to explain. Don't hesitate to ask further questions.
Thanks for making this stuff so simple. I got your words and it is very helpful.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Make the coaster in two sections with the top out of 5mm MDF. If working from largest coaster the inner "waste" could be suitable for the next smaller top. I think a Dremel could handle that and if doing multiples a simple jig could be set up. By doing the coaster in two pieces you can also vary the outline to make unique patterns.
Thanks, I'm intending to have a range of sizes available but I'll take it a step at a time and then just start adding in when I know I can accurately produce 10 or 20 pieces at a time.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top