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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone know the original grind on Lion Trimmer knives?
Hollow grind?
Flat Grind?
Back Bevel?
something else or combination of something?
Or has experience taught you a better grind?

I obtained a Lion trimmer & someone did a botched (in my opinion) resharpening job. So I'm planning to send it out for resharpening & would like to tell the service what grind to put on it? They have agreed to put on whatever I want so I figured that the factory/manufacturer would know best.


Doing it myself for the initial tuneup is probably out of my wheelhouse.

thks

smitty
 

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hollow w/ a micro back bevel...
and what do mean grind...
it's hone...
 

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Grizzly and Lee Valley make clones. Maybe one of them would tell you.
 

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I have the Griz version. Holy cow those blades are sharp. I'll see if I can find the instruction that came with it. I wouldn't touch that blade with a wet stone. I would use a diamond "stone" and lap it lightly. L

Found a Lee Valley link on the topic here: How to Sharpen a Miter Trimmer Blade? *PIC*

It says don't lap the back. There are a number of links on the site with comments on sharpening from users.

I love having it though. My artist wife popped for it so I could make frames for her. Nothing cuts perfect miters like the Lion type trimmer. You can also cut perfect 90s on it. You trim your frame piece about 3/16th long and trim to final size. Use a stop to make certain the opposite pieces are cut exactly the same length. The Griz comes with a couple of aluminum supports with a movable stop block. Depending on the wood, it cuts a glass smooth surface. Pix attached. The original Lyon model was invented in the late 1800s. Every frame shop has a miter trimmer. When I first got it, I just grabbed it to lift it out of the box, and sliced my finger. So mine is mounted on a platform with handles at the balance point so I won't be temped. I also keep a blocking piece in front of the blade for safety.

This is FYI for anyone wondering what the heck it is.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
ok FWIW
according to Lee Valley the grind is

a flat grind with a small back bevel.

Just adding this for anyone in the future.

Price (currently) is 85.00 USD
shipping approximately 10.00 USD.

again thks to all

smitty
 

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One blog I read had several people saying not to hone the back of the blade, that even a few thousandths could affect the cut so I would just go with the very small back bevel and leave the rest of the back alone and see how that cuts.
 

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One blog I read had several people saying not to hone the back of the blade, that even a few thousandths could affect the cut so I would just go with the very small back bevel and leave the rest of the back alone and see how that cuts.
Correct, Charles...the back of the blade is not to be touched. The knives are sharpened at the bevel side with a micro-bevel.

My Lion has explicit instructions not to touch the back of the blade as it rides against the frame to create a scissor effect.

If the back were to be sanded in any way, it would alter the adjustment between the blade and the frame and would not cut properly...
 
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Does anyone know the original grind on Lion Trimmer knives?
Hollow grind?
Flat Grind?
Back Bevel?
something else or combination of something?
Or has experience taught you a better grind?

I obtained a Lion trimmer & someone did a botched (in my opinion) resharpening job. So I'm planning to send it out for resharpening & would like to tell the service what grind to put on it? They have agreed to put on whatever I want so I figured that the factory/manufacturer would know best.


Doing it myself for the initial tuneup is probably out of my wheelhouse.

thks

smitty

Flat grind with a small micro-bevel...don't know the related angles...

Keep in mind the piece should be cut with the visible/exterior face up...this will ensure the smoothest cut faces out as a result of the scissor action of the blade. Don't attempt to cut a large amount...just a few thousands at a time...this will leave an unbelievably finished cut on the cross-grain side...
 

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I am glad this thread came to be, I have one in the box been sitting there for several years, never used. Don't know why I bought it years ago, If I remember correctly I had a job coming up for a bunch of picture frames and bought it for that, but the job never materialized.

Herb
 

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Herb, It is a precision cutter. Exact 45 and 90. I have used it a couple of times to trim the end of a front frame for pocket hole assembly. If the cut is a perfect 90, the frame will be perfectly square. I'd hate to have to make picture frames without it. But be really careful, sharp doesn't adequately describe that blade. Keep the cardboard in it so you aren't tempted to grab it.
 
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