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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello,

Sorry for posting something not relevant to routing, but I feel somehow a little desperate. I have this power drill 12V with ION batteries. The problem is it just wont fully charge - charger stops charging when batteries reaches 11,6V and not as expected 12,5V. This means it operating time is rather short max 4 minutes while running the drill on idle. (battery size 1,5 Ah).
This appears to both batteries included in its package. For info; This drill is used very little since purchase.

I been trying to find any clue on internet but have failed so far.
I would be delighful if anyone reading this thread has an answer or a solution how to fix its problem.
Thanks in advance.
 

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Most Lithium battery packs have built in limiter circuits. For discharge and charging. It keeps them from over heating. That's why lithium tools just stop when the battery voltage gets too low. Not like nicads that just get slower and slower. You did not mention the brand of drill but you may want to check with the manufacturer. Maybe the internal limiter circuit is set to low on that batch of batteries. I don't think that is a user serviceable item.
 

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M. Guillot, I agree with Roxanne.
The better batteries have a microchip in them, to monitor the status of individual cells in the pack. Definitely not user-serviceable. Return to the supplier for testing and replacement.
 

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what brand of drill and how long have you had it??...
 

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Unfortunately it sounds like your batteries are dying. Even Lithium ION Batteries go bad. The sad part is the batteries will likely cost more than buying a new drill with new batteries. If you decide to buy new batteries I suggest you get the original equipment. Amazon sells a lot of generic batteries that will not last any time at all. The reason they are cheap is they are cheap batteries. If you decide to replace your rig I suggest Dewalt. The tool industry has consolidated and competing brands are not under just a few banners. The Dewalts have given me good service over the years and if you go on a job site you see a lot of Dewalt yellow. Pro buy what works and do not care about gimmicks or "Features" that you will never use.
 

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Theo
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Unfortunately it sounds like your batteries are dying. Even Lithium ION Batteries go bad. The sad part is the batteries will likely cost more than buying a new drill with new batteries.
Yeah, batteries dying is one of the reasons I do not use battery powered tools. Except flashlights, and it's bad enough buying batteries for them. Battery powered tools have their place in the world, no doubt about it. But me, I work in, or close to, my shop. As long as a plug in is handy, no battery tools for me. I can't see any sensible reason why it would cost less to buy a new tool, with battery, then it would cost to buy just the battery. So for me it is either corded tools, or cordless that are hand operated. I'm happy with that.
 
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Unfortunately it sounds like your batteries are dying. Even Lithium ION Batteries go bad. The sad part is the batteries will likely cost more than buying a new drill with new batteries. If you decide to buy new batteries I suggest you get the original equipment. Amazon sells a lot of generic batteries that will not last any time at all. The reason they are cheap is they are cheap batteries. If you decide to replace your rig I suggest Dewalt. The tool industry has consolidated and competing brands are not under just a few banners. The Dewalts have given me good service over the years and if you go on a job site you see a lot of Dewalt yellow. Pro buy what works and do not care about gimmicks or "Features" that you will never use.
Agree as well. My 1st cordless drill was a Panasonic which I loved. It had plenty of power and saved me many an arm/hand cramp. I was working in HVAC and the number of screws manufacturers used to hold the access doors on was ridiculous. Biggest complaint I ever had with these was the lack of understanding people had of using the dang clutch so they didn't ream out the screw holes and the proper charging method. The early ones were ni-cad and they needed full discharge/recharge. When mine was getting low I would place it somewhere so the trigger would be held shut to run the battery completely down then recharge it fully. The old batteries would develop a memory and was a real pia to recover near full charge when improperly charged. And even now the battery cost is often near the total tool cost in some cases.

By the brand name batteries when ever possible and get the full warranty with them. It's cheaper in the long run. Also when looking to buy consider the cost of the replacement batteries/chargers. When my Panasonic charger died, long story, it was almost the cost of a new and better drill kit.
 

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Rick
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I had a Makita drill and the batteries lasted very briefly . Found out it was actually the motor , not the bats at all .
The drill had been dropped ,and this had realigned the particles in the motors magnets
 

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I had a marital drill and the batteries lasted very briefly . Found out it was actually the motor , not the bats at all .
The drill had been dropped ,and this had realigned the particles in the motors magnets


When I first read this I thought you meant your wife was drilling you. They tend to do that. They are always trying to screw you to the wall.>:)
 

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In a perfect world I would like to try the batteries in a different charger. That way you could see if the problem follows the battery or the charger. I had a hitachi NiCad charger that failed. I thought the batteries were bad, but the circuit in the charger had failed, blowing fuses i after about 45 minutes of charging
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Hello and thanks for many answers. The brand is of high German Quality - AEG. The drill itself is not a big one, just small and handy for for drilling sessions or to screw screws. The model type is a "BS 12C".
I think my problem causes many DIY's to get feeled cheated by the large amount of advertising without anyone warning baterrypowered equipment SHOULD be used and not stored in a cellar for severals months before it gets used next time.
Yes, the price of batteries are completly out of this world. Its like all manufactures cynically wants users to buy new equipment, and this goes on and on.

I was even thinking of charging the batteries with for carcharger - but this could be a very stupid idea...
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Yeah, batteries dying is one of the reasons I do not use battery powered tools. Except flashlights, and it's bad enough buying batteries for them. Battery powered tools have their place in the world, no doubt about it. But me, I work in, or close to, my shop. As long as a plug in is handy, no battery tools for me. I can't see any sensible reason why it would cost less to buy a new tool, with battery, then it would cost to buy just the battery. So for me it is either corded tools, or cordless that are hand operated. I'm happy with that.
I totally agree with you JOAT.
I have 2 batterypowered drills. A Bosch GSR 12v - powered with NICD - think I bought it i 2005 and this one an AEG BS12c wich I bought i (I think) 2015. The AEG is hardly been used and its a pity; when you want these tools to be operative - they both let you down cause to battery problems. I also obsevred several tool shops in my area have stopped selling cordpowered tools..
 

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Ms. Guillot,
As a general rule, Ni-Cad batteries are good for about 300 charge cycles(completely flat to fully charged), provided one or more of the individual cells in the battery pack do not deteriorate more rapidly. It looks like you derived good longevity from your Bosch.
The Li-ion should do better than that, but as you say, it depends on the amount of charge in the battery when stored for long periods of disuse.
Have you considered converting your Bosch for use as a “corded” drill with a car battery? Open the battery case, remove all the cells (but take care to keep the contacts in the correct position - you may have to use an epoxy resin to do so) and drill a hole in the case for the two-core wire. Solder or otherwise attach the wire to the two contacts (there may be more than two - the others are for temperature regulation or monitoring), and re-assemble the case.
Put car battery terminals on the other end of the wires - remember to observe polarity - and you will be able to use the drill for many more years, even with a weak car battery. I used one for years, until it was stolen.
And it need not be a car battery either - a smaller, sealed 12V battery will do, and you can charge it with your car charger, or even asolar charger.
 

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I have read about this and one battery expert says to rejuvenate take another battery of same voltage that is charged completely . The reason they fail is you have multiple cells in series and 1 or more cells are not completely charging. His suggestion is to take another battery of same voltage that is fully charged verified by your volt meter. and connect in same polarity for 15 minutes only. The old battery will get hot . No more than 15 minutes. Then put it back on normal charger. You may have to do this 3 or 4 times. The theory is as has been stated chargers are built to charge to certain level no more. A word of caution lithium battery's are dangerous .
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Now that sounds logical - I will do so. But the question remains in tha cause: what causes the one cell to not charge fully up?
I sent both tools to a local serviceman a couple of weeks ago. I'm waiting to see if he has fixed the problem. He mentioned he had a procedure for this common problem. I will contact him and tell him about this info.
Can I , in this "scenario" use a fully charged carbattery and transfer the voltage?
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Now that sounds logical - I will do so. But the question remains in tha cause: what causes that one cell to not charge fully up?
I sent both tools to a local serviceman a couple of weeks ago. I'm waiting to see if he has fixed the problem. He mentioned he had a procedure for this common problem. I will contact him and tell him about this info.
Can I , in this "scenario" use a fully charged carbattery and transfer the voltage?
 

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One thing I like about DeWalt is that they have an upgrade device so you can use the 20v new LI batteries on the 18v tools. On my gadget, it is easy to remove the 20v battery for recharging, but very difficult to remove the adapter to use the 18 v on the tool. I kept my eyes open until DeWalt offered a "kit", which included their 4AH larger battery for a reasonable price. Don't leave the LI battery in the charger. There's a reason you can't fly with LI batteries in your checked luggage, you have to carry them aboard.
 

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I have tried that procedure with a NiCad battery, with limited success - it worked, but the battery capacity was significantly lower, and the effect only lasted for a couple of charges.
I used a car battery on a 12 volt battery pack. I also tried a circuit using mains electricity and a heavy duty rectifier and a current limiting resistor - cannot remember where I got the diagram. Same result as above.
I have read that the memory effect is due to the formation of dendrites (chemical filaments) in the battery electrolyte. Connecting up a charged battery theoretically “burns away” the dendrites. But after about 300 charge cycles, the individual cells deteriorate anyway. Time for a new battery.
I have not had the need, or the courage, to try it on a lithium battery. Flammability is said to be higher.
The question of why individual cells fail at different times, is a good one. Whenever I have had to replace a car battery only one of the lead-acid cells has been faulty. In the old days, it was possible to melt the compound holding the cells together, and replace an individual cell - they had metal connectors on top, connecting each cell in series with the next. But then at each service, the battery was drained, flushed and refilled. Now it is cheaper to replace the battery.
 

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All of the lithium ion batteries I’ve read about have electronic chips in the batteries and I think in the charger to prevent excessive discharge or charging. Lithium batteries can catch fire if they get too hot and lithium is also supposed to be highly explosive under the right conditions.
 
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