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I have greatly improved not only the process but the speed at cutting Longworth chucks so I thought I'd do another video. When I first cut these chucks they were taking about 16 minutes per disc followed by 5 minutes or more per disc of hand sanding the edges to clean off the tabs and to round the edge. Occasionally the Baltic Birch would chip where I cut a tab and that was frustrating.

Anyway, it's now a fairly refined and efficient process for a small home workshop. It could be improved upon but for now it's working just fine. The tools for the entire process are circular saw to break down the BB, table saw, drill press, CNC, stationary belt sander, drum sander, and ROS.

Here's the video -

Enjoy!
David
 

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I have greatly improved not only the process but the speed at cutting Longworth chucks so I thought I'd do another video. When I first cut these chucks they were taking about 16 minutes per disc followed by 5 minutes or more per disc of hand sanding the edges to clean off the tabs and to round the edge. Occasionally the Baltic Birch would chip where I cut a tab and that was frustrating.

Anyway, it's now a fairly refined and efficient process for a small home workshop. It could be improved upon but for now it's working just fine. The tools for the entire process are circular saw to break down the BB, table saw, drill press, CNC, stationary belt sander, drum sander, and ROS.

Here's the video -
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G_SmnZhTTqg

Enjoy!
David
Thanks ,David, for the excellent video,showing how you do it, I know that there is a lot of time spent making it look so simple.
Herb
 

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Great video David.
 
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Nice work David ,always enjoy your videos . You’ve certainly got this down to a science ;)
 

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Great video. This is a perfect example of constantly learning and using that knowledge to your benefit. You keep changing your toolpaths, not only to cut faster but to save time in the hands-on finishing processes. Now it is time to develop new products for the woodturners. Maybe a few different size donut chucks.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks, Mike and all! I actually have a new chuck prototype here and it was developed by an older gentleman who wants me to cut one for him. Right now I'm evaluating his design, what it will take to produce them at a reasonable cost, and then to see if there's a market. That may be a bit backward but since I'm cutting one for him anyway then that's the order in which I'll tackle this project.

David
 

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Great video. This is a perfect example of constantly learning and using that knowledge to your benefit. You keep changing your toolpaths, not only to cut faster but to save time in the hands-on finishing processes. Now it is time to develop new products for the woodturners. Maybe a few different size donut chucks.
I'll bet it won't take as long as it did for me to make a doughnut chuck.
 

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I tried some cheap “Hozly” branded compression bits from Alibaba. Have been very pleasantly surprised. 5 1/8” ones and 5 6mm (~1/4”) cost a total of $60. For 10 solid carbide compression bits! I figured they were so cheap I would not hesitate to toss them if they disappointed, but they have been perfect. I cut a lot of 1/2” Baltic birch for a customer and I provide them with no post cut sanding. With compression bits, I do not use tabs, the chips pack in the slot and keep anything from moving.

http://s.aliexpress.com/aqq6rAnq
 

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What feed rate are you cutting when you don't have tabs, Richard? On the Longworth chucks my DC pulls most of the dust out of the slots but leaves some in the perimeter cut. If you saw the video you'll recall I cut the first pass rough and leave tabs to help hold them in place and the finish cut only removes a few thousandths plus the tabs.

It might be different with 1/8" bits, though. Your link didn't work, btw.

David
 

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What feed rate are you cutting when you don't have tabs, Richard?
David
I have been cutting using the 1/8” bits at 150ipm, .25” deep. I believe I can go faster, and will be doing some testing to see if it will do single pass. Others I have recommended the same bits to have gone faster and/or full depth successfully, but I have not tried it yet.
 

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I tried some cheap “Hozly” branded compression bits from Alibaba. Have been very pleasantly surprised. 5 1/8” ones and 5 6mm (~1/4”) cost a total of $60. For 10 solid carbide compression bits! I figured they were so cheap I would not hesitate to toss them if they disappointed, but they have been perfect. I cut a lot of 1/2” Baltic birch for a customer and I provide them with no post cut sanding. With compression bits, I do not use tabs, the chips pack in the slot and keep anything from moving.

http://s.aliexpress.com/aqq6rAnq
Yet another example of "high price isn't a guarantee of high quality and low price does not necessarily mean low quality"
Lots of members don't agree with me.
 

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we cut some circles on our cnc as well. i use a .25" down cut with tabs (0.10"). then we run them on a router table with a 1/8" roundover w/bearing. i think it will offer a more consistent rounding than the belt sander, and it cuts the tabls off perfectly flush. might even be faster...
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Good idea and point. It probably would be faster, Tim, but that's only if the router table and roundover bit is already set up. In my shop it is not but the belt sander is always available. The CNC finish cut manages to cut the tabs off perfectly flush so that part is over by the time I take the chuck off the CNC.

David
 
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