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Hi all, I am new here and looking for some help finding parts for an old model Craftsman router that was my dad's. I think the model is 315.17550 and it's 1 HP. It runs fine but the collet is damaged rendering it useless unless I can find a replacement. Craftsman isn't making them and I have been unable to find a replacement that matches it. Any help would be appreciated.
 

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John
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Hello and welcome to the router forum,
Finding parts for old craftsman routers Is almost nonexistent you would be further ahead to buy a used router unless you can find somebody that has an old one to let you have the parts probably is not going to happen
 

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good luck w/ that...
you have asked a question that gets asked here often that never seems to get an answer..
 

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Theo
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Got 5, all working, newest around 15 years. And when the first one dies, not even going to try looking for a part, will just toss it, and use the rest until they die. By the way, so show their value, only bought two, the others were given to me.
 

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Welcome, sorry we couldn't help with that. If you can manage it, a new router is probably a good idea. Generally speaking we lean toward the Bosch 1617 EVSPK kit. This has a 2 1/4 hp router motor and both a fixed and plunge base. Almost anything you want to do with a hand held router you can do with a plunge base, which allows you to push the bit into the workpiece. The fixed base on the 1617 can be used in a router table to mount your router in. My 1617 was on sale for $200 for the kit, but you can sometimes fine refurbished ones at CPO tools. These are not used, but returned routers that have been rebuilt to better than factory specs.

A router table is far safer than working with a fixed base router freehand, because you are moving the workpiece against the exposed bit, not the other way around. Much better control, and you can use what are called push blocks to move the piece around while your hands are safely away from the bit.

A router table can quickly be made out of a flat chunk of plywood, 2x3 ft is a good size. You cut a hole in the middle, about one and a half in diameter. screw the fixed base underneath, insert the motor, adjust the height to roughly what you wan, flip the clampin lever. Then do fine adjustment with a knob on the router motor. You can also buy a key that lets you drill a hole, insert the key into the top of that fine adjustment knob and you can fix the height perfectly. Add a really straight 2x4 that you can clamp to the top and voila', you have a perfectly good router table. Many here still use simple home built tables, preferring to spend their money on other toys.

Kind of a long entry, but we all try to cover the bases thoroughly.

BTW, the collet is an extremely precise device, a masterpiece of engineering that has clearances of only a few thousandths tolerances. The 1617 kit comes with both a half inch and quarter inch collet, and you can buy them easily. We're pretty fond of Bosch in the USA because the bend over backwards to support their tools.

There are many small routers, but the 2.25 hp is suitable for table and freehand use. Lighter versions are between one and 1.5 hp. The one hp is usually called a trim router and is suitable for light duty only. the 1.5 hp is often used for making signs and is really comfortable to use for freehand routing. It's a little light duty for a table. Many of us here have several routers. I have 2 1617s, (one used to be in the table only). But I replaced it with a 3.25hp "Triton" brand router that has a built in height adjustment. Heavy duty and too big for me to use frehand. I also have a 1hp Bosch "Colt," which I often reach for when I'm not cutting away much material. The smaller router only takes a bit with a quarter inch shank.

Sorry there was no help for the question you asked, but I hope this post has been helpful. One thing that really assists us is when you tell us about what kinds of projects you want to build. If budget's an issue, we will try to find a workaround, such as the shop built router table.

The pictures are of the 1617 with its plunge base. The other bottom pix is of the 1hp Colt alongside its much smaller plunge base. The Colt is maybe 1/2
 

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Ross
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Welcome to the forum.
 

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The 315 number for that product indicates that it was made by Ryobi so there is a possibility that a Ryobi model or two had the same collet. One of the problems with collets is that I don't believe any of the router manufacturers make their own collets unless maybe PC does. I think all the others job that out. So Ryobi could be using collets from a number of different companies which may be why it's such a problem to find replacements. The most common collet in use right now is used by Bosch, Hitachi, DeWalt, and Makita and from what I've read appears to be made by a company called Accurate Electric just to highlight what the problem is.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for all the feedback. I am looking for a new handheld. I have a mounted one on a table for smaller projects.
 

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Jimbo the best bang for your buck is a combo kit that has a plunge base and a fixed base with a motor that changes between them. A plunge will do any job but some jobs are nicer to do with a fixed base as they are a bit more stable to handle. Some jobs can't be done well or safely with fixed bases which is why getting a plunge is recommended.

Bosch and Hitachi both have those kits in a mid size router that accepts 1/2" bits are are powerful enough to do any job without being so heavy that you don't want to hoist them. The Bosch model is the 1617 EVSPK and the Hitachi-Metabo is the HPT KM12VC. DeWalt also has a kit, the 618PK.

One of the pluses with these 3 is that they all use the same collet so you won't need to worry about needing one and not finding it for decades to come.
 
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and Bosch CS is outstanding...
 

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Welcome to the forum...
 

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Hi all, I am new here and looking for some help finding parts for an old model Craftsman router that was my dad's. I think the model is 315.17550 and it's 1 HP. It runs fine but the collet is damaged rendering it useless unless I can find a replacement. Craftsman isn't making them and I have been unable to find a replacement that matches it. Any help would be appreciated.

As some other may have stated....


My take on this is to keep the old router on a shelf for memories and buy a new one if you want to get into wood working. The newer routers are so improved....
 
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