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Discussion Starter #1
Looking at some of the photos that are posted of work being cut on a CNC, I thought that these clamps may be of interest to those needing to clamp thin material but still needing access to the complete work surface. Looks as if they would be convenient to use; push the clamp cam surface up against the part and run in the first screw, pivot the clamp on the screw to apply pressure to the part and then install the second screw to prevent the clamp from rotating loose.

https://tsoproducts.com/workholding-accessories/ujk-technology-surface-cam-duck-clamps/
 

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Theo
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An oversized "comma" can do the same thing.
Screwing into a scrap worktop right? Screw holes
in the bench, no thanks.
 

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Yeah, I was thinking that one might want to screw into a piece of plywood rather than a nice workbench top.
I just replaced my "spoil board" and not interested in drilling holes in it. Well, OK, so I have just drilled two new screw holes. :frown: The reason being to hold the board down because I needed to surface plane it.

I like these clamps. Gotta think about them some more. No doubt, I can make something similar. Maybe not as glamorous though. Might even be able to clamp to the T track with a 1/4 inch bolt, but that second one might require a screw. At least I got the thinker thinking!:grin:
 

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I wouldn't want to screw them into my bench either but if you were using them in a CNC then maybe wouldn't mind screwing them into the spoil board. Harry used to post pictures of a cam board he made for using with his skis but I think he said it was a bit time consuming to use. I also think it was wooden dowels drilled off center. This is one of my go to methods for hard to clamp items and if I need them to sit below the surface of something thin I would just shim it up higher. Veritas® Wonder Dog® & Wonder Pup® - Lee Valley Tools They are a bit pricey but they work well and are well made.
 
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Discussion Starter #9
An oversized "comma" can do the same thing.
Screwing into a scrap worktop right? Screw holes
in the bench, no thanks.
I assumed that the CNC guys might be interested, and would look at screwing them to the spoil board. I believe that's what is shown on the web page. Thinking too that they made be made out of some type of phenolic or similar plastic.
 

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Theo
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I wouldn't want to screw them into my bench either but if you were using them in a CNC then maybe wouldn't mind screwing them into the spoil board. Harry used to post pictures of a cam board he made for using with his skis but I think he said it was a bit time consuming to use. I also think it was wooden dowels drilled off center. This is one of my go to methods for hard to clamp items and if I need them to sit below the surface of something thin I would just shim it up higher. Veritas® Wonder Dog® & Wonder Pup® - Lee Valley Tools They are a bit pricey but they work well and are well made.
I was thinking that a lot of you guys drill dog holes in your workbench tops, and was thinking something could be done with those, rather than screwing something down. This is a whole lot better than anything I came up with, and wouldn't be hard to make your own. You could even make custom ends, rather than the rectangular ones shown. Don't need the fancy tightening thingy either, can just file or grind into a square tip, and use a wrench. If nothing else, could use a nut with a metal tip welded on, or even wood. The hardware store here has threaded rod. Weld a nut on its side atop a round piece of metal, and you've got your own clampy thingy. Might not look as purty, but it will work, and you made it yourself. Now all I need is a workbench, so I can drill holes in it. Wait, I don't need a workbench just now. Drat.
 

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Just remember if you are using a up-cut bit you should be using a clamp that clamps the board down. These would be good where you want to skim the surface of the board using a straight router bit or a down-cut bit. V-carving would be okay.

Here is a picture of one way they could be used with T-tracks.
 

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Chuck,

I like these but why are they so expensive. I haven't drilled the holes yet in my workbench but I will soon, and I was thinking of using a 3/4'' hardwood dowel and cutting it to be bench dogs. If I make the upper part of one side flat would this be sufficient ? Even a stay fast is pricey.

Dan
 

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Chuck,

I like these but why are they so expensive. I haven't drilled the holes yet in my workbench but I will soon, and I was thinking of using a 3/4'' hardwood dowel and cutting it to be bench dogs. If I make the upper part of one side flat would this be sufficient ? Even a stay fast is pricey.

Dan
I think they're so expensive because most people aren't lucky enough to have a brain trust to call on like us forum members do.
 

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Just remember if you are using a up-cut bit you should be using a clamp that clamps the board down. These would be good where you want to skim the surface of the board using a straight router bit or a down-cut bit. V-carving would be okay.

Here is a picture of one way they could be used with T-tracks.
My thoughts also.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Looks good, Mike. And I had another thought - if there is a concern that the clamps have to resist upward force, why not start with the blank having a rabbet along two edges and make the clamp with a mating rabbet along the large radius so it would overlap and also provide axial force?
 
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