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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Jointed a board and it became wedge shaped,why?
Sequence? If I start with a bowed board and give it several passes until the face is flat, then edge. If the edge is not square with face, do I then edge, then face, then edge, face until all square. Or continue edging until the edge is square with the face. Then run through the planer?
 

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face then edge...
cheat on the edge..
.
 

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You register the edge to the face so face comes first. Jointers are good at making wedges. Planers make them flat again.
 

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Saw a video today that discussed this. Think it was woodworkers guild...
Apparently, the jointer isn't perfectly 90* to the fence.
The work around is to joint one edge to one face of the board, then when you joint the opposite edge use the other board face. That way the two opposing angles match to make a flat glue up.
 

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parallel the opposite side on the TS...
 

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Saw a video today that discussed this. Think it was woodworkers guild...
Apparently, the jointer isn't perfectly 90* to the fence.
The work around is to joint one edge to one face of the board, then when you joint the opposite edge use the other board face. That way the two opposing angles match to make a flat glue up.
If the board had any twist to it at all then it needs to go through a planer after flattening one side in order to get both faces parallel to each other. Since the opposite face may not be co-planar until it does go though the planer then if you joint the edges before hand you should register the same face against the jointer fence. And that's after you made sure that both edges are co-planar by ripping one edge on the TS after the first edge gets jointed like Stick said. My jointer sits right behind me at the TS and I often have both running at the same time for that reason.
 

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All above is good advice but I would first check and make sure my knives are adjusted properly. Then check that the tables are parallel. If the jointer is setup properly then proceed. I had bought a used jointer some time back and found that my first board was a wedge no matter what. Had I taken the time to check the tool I would have found it was out of adjustment. The knives were OK but I replaced them and had them sharpened as well. Due diligence will help with success. Of course knowledge doesn't hurt either......

-Steve
 

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If the board had any twist to it at all then it needs to go through a planer after flattening one side in order to get both faces parallel to each other. Since the opposite face may not be co-planar until it does go though the planer then if you joint the edges before hand you should register the same face against the jointer fence. And that's after you made sure that both edges are co-planar by ripping one edge on the TS after the first edge gets jointed like Stick said. My jointer sits right behind me at the TS and I often have both running at the same time for that reason.
O.k. Chuck, now say it again in English, eh.
 

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Re the "flattening one side" part.
You can do that with the planer as well. You'd have to set it up on an already flat board, so that one face is rock steady on shims, against the flat carrier board. Basically a shim sandwich.
Once the top face is evenly flat, remove it from the carrier, flip it over and do the opposite face. Now the two faces are 'co-planar'...ie parallel to each other and dead flat on both faces.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
If the board had any twist to it at all then it needs to go through a planer after flattening one side in order to get both faces parallel to each other. Since the opposite face may not be co-planar until it does go though the planer then if you joint the edges before hand you should register the same face against the jointer fence. And that's after you made sure that both edges are co-planar by ripping one edge on the TS after the first edge gets jointed like Stick said. My jointer sits right behind me at the TS and I often have both running at the same time for that reason.
After TS do I edge again on the jointer to clean up any saw marks? I could use a No 4 smoothing plane to clean up edge if need better finish than off the saw.
 

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After TS do I edge again on the jointer to clean up any saw marks? I could use a No 4 smoothing plane to clean up edge if need better finish than off the saw.
You can smooth the edge with a plane but unless you have a plane with a guide on it or are much better with one than I am you may not stay 90* to the face. A properly set jointer will keep it at 90*. If you have a glue line blade on the saw or a blade with a heavy plate thickness though you may not need to smooth the edge. I would try it to see if the joint it makes is smooth enough without smoothing. Glue sticks better to a sawed surface than it does to a planed surface. Planing closes the pores in the wood.

I think this has come up before but it is worth repeating. The blade setting gauge that comes with a jointer only sets the knives level with the head and regulates how much blade is exposed above the head. They do nothing to insure that the blades are co-planar with the outfeed table or that they are level with the outfeed table which they have to be or you will not get a flat surface. For that reason I don't use the blade setting gauge on mine. Instead I take a wide flat hardwood board and hold it down on my outfeed table with the end just over the knives. I rotate the head with the loose knife in it until I think it's at it's highest point then I tighten the knife while holding it down with the board.

Once you've done all the knives then slowly rotate the head with the board over it and compare the drag that each knife has on the board. If they are all pretty much equal then they are very close to level with the outfeed even if the head isn't perfectly level with the bed. You may still need to lift the outfeed a couple of thousandths as there is some compression of the knives against the board doing this method and they might cut very slightly higher than the outfeed because of it.

I read a jointer test that Fine Woodworking published once and it made it onto the web. There may be others too but it's worth looking for them and you can check and make sure your jointer is cutting properly. If you find one you like then post it here.
 

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Jointing

First joint one face of the board flat. Then joint one edge registering from the flat face. Then go to the thickness planer and with flat surface down run through until flat. Then go the table saw and with jointed edge registered on the fence cut the rough edge. If the jointer is on the money you will have a square and consistent board. I should mention the ends need to be squared on the table saw or chop saw using a jointed edge to register from.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
First joint one face of the board flat. Then joint one edge registering from the flat face. Then go to the thickness planer and with flat surface down run through until flat. Then go the table saw and with jointed edge registered on the fence cut the rough edge. If the jointer is on the money you will have a square and consistent board. I should mention the ends need to be squared on the table saw or chop saw using a jointed edge to register from.
OK thanks.
 
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