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I make windows for race/rally cars. A slider kit is fitted to the door window. I need to router a slot in 8mm thick lexan. The material is 465mm long x 22mm wide, 8mm thick. I need to machine a slot 10mm wide, 5mm deep and within 10mm of each end with a 20mm radius.
At the moment a company are machining them on a CNC bed, but getting expensive.
Any ideas please.
Stuart.
 

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Hello N/A and welcome to the forums...
We're happy you found us...

what do you have for tooling???
where in the world are you???
perhaps this PDF will get you started...

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According to the pdf it says that air cooling will help but the most important tip is clamping. Once any hard plastic begins to chatter during milling it is prone to shatter. I've seen a number of companies that offer special router bits for cutting plastic but the one that immediately comes to mind is Onsrud who also have an excellent tech department that can answer questions about feed speeds, rpm, and cutting depths.
 
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Theo
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Just joined the forum.
I make windows for race/rally cars. A slider kit is fitted to the door window. I need to router a slot in 8mm thick lexan. The material is 465mm long x 22mm wide, 8mm thick. I need to machine a slot 10mm wide, 5mm deep and within 10mm of each end with a 20mm radius.
At the moment a company are machining them on a CNC bed, but getting expensive.
Any ideas please.
Stuart.
Way back, seen it done by cutting the hole, then gluing strips slightly away from the hole. Fit the slider in, then glue strips slightly wider than the spacing strips, to hold the slider in. Worked then, will work now, altho not as fancy. That all make sense? K.I.S.S. principle.
 
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G'day Stuart, welcome to the forum...
 

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Mike
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It would help to know what kind of plastic you are talking about routing. The makeup of the plastic will determine what kind of bit to use and the proper feeds and speeds. You might just need to pass the cost to the customer but it will depend on the plastic. You might be able to use a template and a pattern bit to make the cut.

Some plastics are hard to route and that might be why they are charging high prices to do the routing for you. I would think there would be specifications for the plastics used in the race cars.
 

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Rick
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It would help to know what kind of plastic you are talking about routing. The makeup of the plastic will determine what kind of bit to use and the proper feeds and speeds. You might just need to pass the cost to the customer but it will depend on the plastic. You might be able to use a template and a pattern bit to make the cut.

Some plastics are hard to route and that might be why they are charging high prices to do the routing for you. I would think there would be specifications for the plastics used in the race cars.
I believe he mentions lexan


I wish I could see what the finished product looks like to get a better idea . Was thinking a guy could build a jig out of mdf and clamp it down on the lexan to guide the router
 

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Mike
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I believe he mentions lexan


I wish I could see what the finished product looks like to get a better idea . Was thinking a guy could build a jig out of mdf and clamp it down on the lexan to guide the router
I missed the reference to Lexan. Since it is Lexan (extruded) you should be able to make a template and use a pattern bit to cut the pocket. Rout at a medium depth and speed, keep the router moving to avoid overheating and causing melt back.

You probably need to do some testing to find the best depths of cut and rates of feed.
 
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