Router Forums banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
19,965 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
398477

This is a repost of a response to an old thread on how to put together a multi sided frame. I took some time answering, but realized it would soon disappear. so here is my response, along with a pdf of the calculations and other hints for making these complex frames or even solid tops. Enjoy.

My best, most accurate solution has been to use the Rockler table saw sled, picture below. It has a swing arm with extremely precise markings for the angle of the fence. It's all in the setup. I set it up so Zero is perfectly 90 to the full kerf blade, and that the blade is perfectly parallel to the miter slots. On this once you set the fence 90 to the blade, you then move the indicator so it is on the zero line. After that, you can cut any angle you wish, and it's markings are sufficiently far apart so you can do half and even a quarter of a degree cuts with astonishing accuracy.
398474

If you are going for ridiculous accuracy, you can clamp the workpiece to the fence because it can slip slightly. Add a strip of self adhesive sandpaper to the front of the swinging fence. Use a stop block to get all pieces to the same length.

At the bottom is a pdf of the Rockler file on calculating to determine length of each piece to get a particular diameter. I would precut to a little over the desired lengthy, then cut one end to half the angle required, then place the stop block in position and then cut the other end. Thank Rockler for the pdf by buying stuff from them. I don't get a toaster from them, but they are the only woodworking store withing driving range, so I have a lot of their stuff.

Here is a picture of the Freud Industrial Glue Line blade. It is a rip blade but does an equally great job on end grain. It also has an ample amount of carbide, so it can be resharpened many times. It also has every fourth carbide cut flat so it is excellent for 1/8th spline cutting.
398475


I tried for some time to get perfect miter cuts, but found the thin kerf blades would deflect slightly so the angled faces didn't quite meet. I also suggest using a full kerf Glue Line blade for ultra smooth gluing surfaces. Put one coat of glue on the ends, let it dry, then do the finished glue up. This will improve the joint strength. Use the dries clear glue for this application.

Hope this is helpful. By the way, Rockler makes a great, thick draftsman's triangle, clear plastic with a 90 and 45 angle that are right on. I use it all the time. Really handy.
398476
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,961 Posts
All good information Tom but I use the Incra Miter gauge/sled as found here which is extremely accurate. The miter gauge and sled are quality that lasts and needs a quick and well explained setup for your saw. After that it's extremely accurate and repeatable. Just another option.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
19,965 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
All good information Tom but I use the Incra Miter gauge/sled as found here which is extremely accurate. The miter gauge and sled are quality that lasts and needs a quick and well explained setup for your saw. After that it's extremely accurate and repeatable. Just another option.
Hi Steve, I also have the Incra gauge, and it is accurate. I just prefer the sled if I'm trying to get an odd angle. For example, an odd number of sides on the polygon could require fractions of a degree. The Incra is nice because the sled takes up half an inch of blade height.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,239 Posts
Hi Steve, I also have the Incra gauge, and it is accurate. I just prefer the sled if I'm trying to get an odd angle. For example, an odd number of sides on the polygon could require fractions of a degree. The Incra is nice because the sled takes up half an inch of blade height.
I bought a MiterSet gauge set several years ago, and since getting it, I no longer need to do the calculations. My 4 sided, 6 sided, 8 sided, etc. assemblies all fit together perfectly. It was well worth the investment. The only additional requirement is to use a stop on the miter gauge to assure that all of your work pieces are cut to the exact same length.

Charley
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
19,965 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
I bought a MiterSet gauge set several years ago, and since getting it, I no longer need to do the calculations. My 4 sided, 6 sided, 8 sided, etc. assemblies all fit together perfectly. It was well worth the investment. The only additional requirement is to use a stop on the miter gauge to assure that all of your work pieces are cut to the exact same length.

Charley
I just realized I have that miter set gauge. Just forgot I had it. Here's a video on using it. Demo.

Going out to the shop to locate the set and label it. Bought it just before getting sick, so it slipped my mind. Thanks for the reminder.
 

·
Premium Member
Retired since June 2000
Joined
·
15,004 Posts
I too have a mitre set bought from a fellow member unused not long before I became seriously ill. I wonder if they are jinxed!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
19,965 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I found the set. I'll have to try it out. @harrysin I'm happy to say I've improved considerably and have gotten out into the shop a little bit lately. My wood prep tools are all in the garage and it's full of stuff so I can't get the tools rolled out for use. Really need to clean that out so I can resaw and prep this beautiful chunk of hard maple I got just to make a box. Hope you're feeling better these days Harry.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,239 Posts
We aren't bouncing back like when we were younger, are we? I too have not been in my shop since last August, due to a knee problem that the doctors couldn't seem to fix. It has finally been improving on it's own since January of this year, and I can now walk and balance myself without a cane or walker, but my walking distance is still very limited. The house to the shop (about 150') is just about my limit now, and then I must sit down for 10 or more minutes before trying again. This past Christmas is the first in 17 years that I have not made any reindeer to give away, nor any other hand made wooden gifts. I'm usually quite busy in the shop from September on, usually at least 3 or 4 afternoons a week, until after the New Year, when I begin spending a little less time at woodworking. The rest of the year I tend to work in long day, many hour spurts, spending considerable time in the shop when a project is being built, and then go a week or so between them doing other things.

Last week I spent about 4 hours out there one afternoon, sorting and arranging my hardwood shorts pile, and putting pieces that I don't want into a couple of 14 X 14 X 16" wood crates to give to a woodworker wannabe friend. I have some broken bundles of solid oak hardwood flooring left over from having my living and dining rooms re-done last Fall and he will be getting most of that too. I'm not finished with the sorting, but I haven't been back in the shop since that afternoon last week. Maybe tomorrow I'll make it back out there. I've got way too much stuff in my shop and I can hardly move around in it anymore, so something has to go. Last week I found the top of my assembly bench again too. Lots of things had it completely buried. All has been put back where it belongs now. My son was helping with home repairs while I couldn't do them. When he is finished, his idea of putting everything away is to get it just inside the shop door and dump it where ever convenient. "Nothing" gets put back where it came from.

Charley
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
19,965 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I've been doing little projects, but in spurts. There is an open section of our patio that in Summer heats up the kitchen. So I am making a frame covered with black shade cloth that will slide onto the 2x2 grid. It's 14 ft long, so I did a 2 ft. lap joint on 8 foot 2x2s and will wrap it with shade cloth. The width will be to fit the space. I managed to bring the lumber in but I'm going to finish it up tomorrow. But I did get to use the table saw and some glue. My vocal cords can no longer close, so speaking is difficult, and food getting into my lungs has caused them to weaken. Have oxygen, including a very light weight portable, but it is insufficient for doing anything really athletic. I have been pulling weeds for the last month too. About 10-15 minutes at a time.

I want to do some planting out back, but have to dig some fairly deep holes, and I can only do a little of that. I'm learning slowly about how to use my weight and leverage to get stuff done. I'm very happy my joints are holding up pretty well. Take it easy Charley. People for years said I looked like Gene Hackman. Today I found that he has been retired for nearly 20 years, only doing voice work. He's 92 and is just not up to the rigors of film making anymore. I guess we're all just ageing out.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top