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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I was intending to use a board of white oak I recently got to edge the plywood on my miter saw station build but as I edge jointed and flattened the board I started to see some characteristics I didn't expect. The planner made this far more obvious. Unfortunately I wasn't really thinking at this point other than getting it to the needed thickness (3/4") from the 4/4 rough sawn thickness. So now I have a 3/4" thick white oak board that needs a better purpose and I got to actually thinking again. The idea to make my grandaughters some boxes came to mind as well as the thought I hadn't done this before. Cabinets, shelves, entertainment centers, and the sort no problem but never decorative boxes. So I realize 3/4" is a bit thick for such boxes, I think, and my 3/4" won't likely be able to be resawn on my bandsaw and yield 2 - 3/8" usable boards. But then again I have no idea what guideline to use to determine the necessary thickness for these square/rectangular boxes but was thinking probably 3/8" - 1/2" to be likely candidates.

I had wanted to use my dovetail jig (Porter Cable 4216) to do through dovetails but need a bit more practice and I'm unclear as to the minimum thickness I can use with that procedure. So if any of you kind folks can guide, point, shove, kick me in the right direction it would be wonderful. I think it may be time to try some delicate work for a change. Not quite ready to try bandsaw boxes although they do look interesting and my Laguna 14-12 should be more than capable it will have to wait till another time.
 

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resawing 3/4 stock isn't going to give you two 3/8'' thick boards...
you'll be lucky if you see 5/16" because of blade waste and planing..
 

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If you don't have enough of the oak to do the boxes, consider using a mix of other woods with it. Contrasting woods usually look best together. Depending how much of the oak you have, use it for tops and bottoms, or ends or sides. If you use something light for the sides like maple, the oak stained very dark could be very attractice. You could even order the maple used for drawer sides that are between 3/8ths and 1/2 inch thick. Use a little of the maple to make a handle on top to emphasize the contrast. Make the box just right to hold a locking diary and add that in with a great pen. They will go over well.
 

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Oliver (Prof. Henry)
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3/4" stock is for BIG boxes. These are what SMALL boxes look like. :grin:
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Nah, not gonna happen. These aren't small they're micro. Boxes are new to me and I've seen some I really like but I don't want to spend months making them either. And I prefer to use through dovetails if I can. I don't see any on those.........

I'm guessing for the 4,5,and 6" sized boxes 3/8" should be sufficient and as my laser is out of commision the 3/4" will either have to be planed or I'll need to get thicker wood and resaw, also somewhat new to me. Although I did resaw a 2x6 just to see how ell it would work. My 3/4" saw blade did fine on that.
 

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@sreily

Steve, how long and how wide is your board?
 

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@sreilly

you have more than enough for a couple of nice sized boxes. Do you have a particular size in mind, and how many in total do you intend to make. No way will you get a couple of 3/8" by resawing. I'd go for a nice 1/2" for sides and tops. Dovetailing will ensure a sound construction of the box. Things to consider might be given your reservations are.
Outside dimensions: Length, width, height (including lid)
what to use for the bottom and how to incorporate it into the sides (dado or groove)
what kind of lid (top) will it rest atop the upper edges of the sides or will it lay within the inner dimensions. If it lays within the inner dimensions, how will you lift the lid up
what type of hinge will you be using
feet: flat bottom, feet cut into the body, attached individually
flocking or felt for the inside
Anything special you would like to include into the builds (inlay, trim, accents etc...)
finish schedule

do you have the equipment to do what you want to do. Do you have a "GOOD" resaw blade? Your bandsaw is well know for it's resawing capabilities so you should be good there. White oak can be VERY VERY hard to resaw. A good setup and a nice slow feed rate and you'll be golden. If you're new to resawing I'd suggest cutting your boards down to more manageable lengths based on your dimensions.

If this is all new to ya, just think it thru, plan ahead and ASK when your not sure first......plenty of folks to help you along the way in here :)
 

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A bit of a trick to resawing is to use a thin kerf saw blade in your table saw and make a slot in the center of each edge of your board, then use your band saw to separate the two pieces. The kerfs formed by using the thin kerf blade in the table saw first will help guide the band saw blade.

Charley
 
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