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Hi guys, it has a been a while, too much going on on the homefront. Anyway, I may be able to get a shop area in a neighbor's garage, that would make the spouse happy, but not sure it meets electrical needs. Either will use that space or get my basement fixed up for dust collection and remediate dust migration.

Anyway, I noticed several of my windows, the upper sash typically, has the bottom rails sagging. If I was 105 years old I'd probably sag too. I was thinking to fix these, but the last sash repair I did was a little painful, although I learned a lot, and attaching to stiles that are 105 years old leaved a little to be desired. So, I figure, why not make all new sashes! Would certainly be easier to join the pieces together and could make several at a time pretty easily. This leads me to maybe make them for other neighbors as well, with some monetary incentives. I have in my mind that I would use mostly the router and table saw. The joint is typical of 1912 I guess, a open slot mortise. Just downloaded this free book and seems very handy in explaining how to make joints and what the names are. The Joint Book: Complete Guide to Wood Joinery - Download Free EBooks

I believe Douglas fir is generally used for this type of window, but I live on the east coast, near DC, and it isn't that prevalent, actually have to order from the west coast or go to a few specific places that have a 2x4 8ft for about $23. This seems a bit high, but not sure any alternative. Could ordering and having it shipped be a better price? Is yellow pine OK for this type of work? Most of these windows in my area are painted, but guess one could use stain and poly.

I would certainly make some out of cheap pine to get process down and make some standards to help set router table up to speed production. Not sure I could make much money, but I'd like to get my toys...I mean tools paid for! :smile:

Anyway, I'm open to suggestions. Probably won't do anything in the next month or so. Oh, we are limited in my area to use similar materials for replacement on historic homes, so wood for wood, but I don't think they care about species. Hopefully this will spawn some good conversation.
 

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There may have been some species of pine used but I'm not certain. Oak was pretty common for lots of things back then and has decent weather resistance. We have some windows made from lodgepole pine here which has moderate weather resistance. D fir is very common here too. I have a yard full of both those species. D for is a bit more weather resistant than pine. If you keep them painted and replace the glazing putty if it starts cracking then you should get good life from them.

I've always heard that joint being called a bridle or saddle joint.
 

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There may have been some species of pine used but I'm not certain.
Oak was pretty common for lots of things back then
I've always heard that joint being called a bridle or saddle joint.
VGF...
QSWO...
correct...
also a jack miter...
 
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