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Rick
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Now I have to wonder why this never dawned on me . I’m watching this guy build a sled for his table saw ,when later on in the video he makes a zero clearance plate .
For whatever reason I never thought to use the factory plate as a template , duh!
Is this the standard way of doing it and I’m not paying attention ?

@7:00

 

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That's what I do. I add a couple of drops of hot melt glue to a piece of mdf and stick em together and then either use a pattern or flush trim. My unisaw takes a fairly thick insert and it has set screws to level it with the top. The mdf threads just fine for the set screws and there is enough friction in the threads to keep them turning in use. I made about 6 last time I made some. Then when I use them I write in felt tip on the underside which blade and whether I used stabilizers etc. If you were making zero clearance for a dado set you could have one for every width stack you use.
 

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Rick
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
That's what I do. I add a couple of drops of hot melt glue to a piece of mdf and stick em together and then either use a pattern or flush trim. My unisaw takes a fairly thick insert and it has set screws to level it with the top. The mdf threads just fine for the set screws and there is enough friction in the threads to keep them turning in use. I made about 6 last time I made some. Then when I use them I write in felt tip on the underside which blade and whether I used stabilizers etc. If you were making zero clearance for a dado set you could have one for every width stack you use.
I’m liking the hot glue idea . Never thought of that one
 

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Rick
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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Well I really have to build some next spring ,as I’ve had problems with small parts falling in the arbour .
Mine has a little pin in the front to hold it in place I believe . Will have to see if that’s necessary or not.

Probably build me one of those sleds to
 

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Short answer...? Yes...

When you draw the line around the original onto your intended piece, remember to JUST BARELY cut the line out when cutting. If you're going to use a bearing guided bit and router, make sure the original and the intended is well tacked together with one of the above methods.

Be careful not to slip or the whirly thingie will make pieces that will defy gravity until one of them hits a vital part of the body...
 
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Steve
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I did that to make an insert for my mitre saw. It's made quite a difference in the cut too which surprised me.
I'll have to make one for the new contractor's table saw now that I finally pulled the trigger and bought it.
 

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I cut mine out with a band saw, sticking to the edge of the line. A touch of sanding and it fit perfectly. This also made it easier to cut the space for the splitter or riving knife. I make 3 or 4 at a time. One for a dado stack you can quickly put in place with a sacrificial fence for rabbets and such. I have a Laguna saw and bought a blank insert for it to use as a pattern.

You can also use the pattern to set the table saw fence and cut to exact width. Then you only have to do the curve.
 

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Rick
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I was thinking using the cnc when it’s up and running , but you’d need the perfect fitting vector first .
May be able to pull it off in Aspire if the ends are actual circles
 

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I was thinking using the cnc when it’s up and running , but you’d need the perfect fitting vector first .
May be able to pull it off in Aspire if the ends are actual circles
Bet I could make 100 or so before you got the pattern into the software. :wink:
 

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For those planning to make zero-clearance inserts, here are a couple of helpful (hopefully) tips.

- With a z-c insert, it's best that it fits in the recess with minimal clearance, Check the factory insert, determine where it's loose and build up those areas with blue tape. Use the modified insert to cut a "master", check it's fit in the recess and adjust as needed. Then mark it as your master and use it to make the inserts that you need.

- Not sure about other brands, but the big problem with the insert on my Unisaw is that it's thicker than the distance from the top down to the tip of the teeth. Various methods have been used to rough in a starter groove - outside blade from your dado set ("But I don't have a dado............") or the 7-1/4" blade from a circular saw, etc. The perfect solution is one of those ideas that, when you see it, you smack yourself on the forehead and think, "Why didn't I think of that?" Basically, you take a piece of 1/4" plywood,hardboard or MDF, rough it to size, trim to your master pattern and rough in a clearance slot with your jigsaw (But I don't have..........) - make the clearance slot wide enough to use with a dado set, just in case. Drop this in the recess and set your blank on top, clamp everything down and raise the saw blade up through the spacer and cut the slot in your insert. Store the spacer with your master pattern and you're ready to make as many inserts as you need.
 

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I was thinking using the cnc when it’s up and running , but you’d need the perfect fitting vector first .
May be able to pull it off in Aspire if the ends are actual circles
Rick, I have the sneakin' suspicion that the world will have moved on to something new by the time you get up and runnin'. Just a hunch, mind you, I was wrong once before.
 
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