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Hello everyone. I am a Newbie and happy to be here. First I would like to thank Cricket for sending a welcome along. Second I am having a hard time finding my way around and learning what I can and can't do, thank you for your patience. Well trying to find the right forun to post my question, I clicked on to a question I believe was from Mickey asking what the tool he had 3 pictures of posted. I believe what you have Mickey is a SHOP SMITH drill press like router table. I own one have used only a few times and like it very much. please feel free to contact me if this makes it's way to you. I need help identifying who make this very large plunge router I picked up a couple years ago with intentions of building another router table. It has a 1/2" shaft with a collet inside and I can slip another one on from my shaper or router but can't figure out how to tighten . I don't know who makes it to find instructions. Here are a few pictures and thank you very much for your help. As you can see in the photo with the magazine nest to it, it is a large machine. It weighs about 12 lbs. It runs smooth and strong. If I could separate the outer plunge casing from the motor and solve the collet issue I would put this in my shop smith router table. Otherwise I'll list and sell. Sincerely; Restored
 

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Welcome to the forum N/A. I don't recognize it. Some routers use two wrenches to loosen the collet. Does the bell shaped washer with the two slots in it turn with shaft? If so, maybe it uses something like a pin spanner wrench to hold that while you unscrew the collet.
 

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Have studied >100 routers, have not seen that router.
But I have seen some like it. 20 years ago Bosch used that design in a big 3 HP fixed base machine. The castings on your tool are so rough it has to be Taiwan or Chinese copy.
The R.Bosch metal finishing was paint on AL. & done quite well.
Have not seen Russian tools, might have come from the USSR.
 

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It looks like the instructions to tighten and loosen the bit on the top knob are fairly explicit. It appears that the collet tightener is somehow attached to and controlled by this knob and the shaft is held by depressing and moving the side lever left or right. What happens when you try to tighten or loosen it this way?

Dennis
 

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Welcome. Good argument for skipping bargains and staying with the good current stuff.

Two wrench style usually involves one wrench on the collet, the other usually fits over a flattened area in the drive shaft, usually just below the collet. That cut freezes the shaft so you can tighten or loosen the collet. The other type will have some kind of pushbutton that pushes a pin against a flat spot to hold it still. There may be some variations, but I've never seen anything that didn't have some way to push a stop against the shaft, perhaps the knob does that as Dennis suggests.

Looking at it again, there is a yellow lever that is labeled Shaft release. Probably means if you push it the other way, it locks the shaft, then the collet is tightened or loosened with the yellow knob. At least that's my guess.
 

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yellow and black, I'm guessing maybe Stanley?
Hi Eric. Just wanted to point out that this post was originally made in 2014, and I don't think the OP has been here since then.
 

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As nobody has the full answer, it is a Stanley 292 1/2in Industrial plunge router. The yellow knob on top is used to tighten and release the collet, an internally threaded long tail type. That means it is a completely tool-less cutter change, but boy is that a slow process although as the tool was actually designed for continuous, repetitive production work where the cutter would be in until it wore out most often, so I doubt that taking three minutes to change a cutter would be much of an issue. Later on Stanley did make a version of this router which used a more conventional collet and nut arrangement and which was slightly cheaper. The plunge depth is about 50mm (2in) and it weighs-in at a thumping great 7,5kg (c. 16.5lbs) making it a real handful, although with all that weight it tends to stay put. In the USA it was around 1600 watts whilst the 240 volt ones we got over here with a slightly different motor were rated at about 1800 watts from memory. They were quite popular with caravan, mobile home and truck body builders I believe as Stanley's pilot plunge bits made doing window cut-outs in aluminium and composite boards straightforward. Manufactured from early 1970s (?) until just after the take-over by Bosch circa 1982/3 (when they would no doubt have been replaced by the Bosch 1611). That's about it other than to say that over here for some reason they painted the handles bright blue

Edit: And I nearly forgot - the answer to how to get the motor out of the base is that on the back side there is a single nylon locking screw near the top of the outer body which needs to be removed kin order to get that motor out
 
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