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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am doing a little remodeling of my old kitchen cabinets. I am changing from a separate oven and cook top to an all in one unit. So a few cabinets are being deleted and changed. They are maple but having yellowed over the years. I am adding some new trim boards and need to match the color. I was thinking maybe BLO and beeswax as it has a nice yellow color. The other option that I can think of is orange shellac.

Has anybody had any good luck with this process?

I can post pictures if that would help.

Any suggestions on coming up a a good color match?
 

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I recently had to match some new oak floor boards with a floor that was about 20 years old. I tried various stain mixtures but in the end orange shellec was a perfect match. I used Zinsser brand and like all waxed shellac the can said not to cover with another finish. I called the manufacturer, Rust-Oleum, and was told that Varathane Crystal Clear Floor Finish would adhere and it did without any problems. Good luck with your project.
 

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@ Lee
This like a good time to build new door and drawer fronts then sand the frames and stain to match.
 
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That does look like orange shellac. My kitchen and family room are knotty pine and covered with orange shellac. It's not a very long wearing finish, but very easy to match and touch up. I have made several major renovations to my kitchen and other than a few screw holes left from moving a few hinges, you can't see what is different. The original wood was actually fir, which has a kind of pink tint to it. I found that a thin coat of MinWax Ipswitch Pine stain, followed by several coats of orange shellac made the new look like the original.

It's always best to experiment a little, but this is what I came up with.

Charley
 

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Lee; if that's a new a gas range, you might want to check into the regs re the allowable distances to flammable surfaces...ie painted/lacquered etc wood cabinet faces. It's changed since those were first installed. Damage claims from a kitchen fire could be disallowed. Don't ask the insurance company; that'll just give them a heads up...
Gas Ranges and Clearance to Combustibles.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Thanks for all the suggestions guys. I am still trying to decide.

I have a little progress. I put in a 20 amp circuit. I pulled all the florescent lights and replaced with three 4 foot LED shop lights from Costco. I extended the light all the way into the corner. I had to change from direct wired to plug in lights.

I painted the light trough a neutral white. I also started priming the shelf and wall.

I built the cabinet front with left over material so it kind of matches. I then added two drawers with sliders. The bottom slider is rated for 100 lbs. so we can put cast iron pans in it. The sides of the bottom drawer is made out of 3/4 inch material with a 1/2 inch bottom. I think it should hold what ever I put in it.

I got the bright idea to replace the drawer slides in all 9 old drawers. I have wasted too much time so I am going to wait until I finish the remodel. I replaced the slides in 3 old drawers using the new Kreg jig. I was all excited it was so easy then I hit a wide drawer with lots of problems. I had to add a piece of maple in the center to pull up the sagging bottom. Then the drawer was rubbing on a counter support under support which I had to take down an 1/8 of an inch. So I spent most of a whole day just fixing this one drawer. Plus I had to hand plane the drawer smooth and straight. Back to the remodel grind.

Boy this change up is taking a lot more time than I thought.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Lee; if that's a new a gas range, you might want to check into the regs re the allowable distances to flammable surfaces...ie painted/lacquered etc wood cabinet faces. It's changed since those were first installed. Damage claims from a kitchen fire could be disallowed. Don't ask the insurance company; that'll just give them a heads up...
Gas Ranges and Clearance to Combustibles.
I may have to think about the new regs. I have 20 something inches but not 30 inches. I may have to take out part of the center cabinet. ugh. More work.
 

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Worst Case Scenario

I may have to think about the new regs. I have 20 something inches but not 30 inches. I may have to take out part of the center cabinet. ugh. More work.
Lee, I mention that because if you have a gas fitter and he takes out a permit, and the Inspector actually shows up and does an inspection, you're in deep doodoo.
You could roll the dice...... ;)
 

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You're lucky! Up here you can't do your own gas fitting. The licensed gas fitter has to hang a little tag on the installation identifying who did the installation.
Gas and Electrical are done by a Provincial Inspector, not the local Bldg. Inspection Dept.

You can however do your own electrical, up to 100A...with a permit and the above mentioned inspection.
I have to say, on the electrical work I've done the Inspectors have bent over backwards to be helpful, and once they see that you're doing a 'professional' job, they're pretty mellow.

Remember this from last year?
Firefighter Dies In New York City House Blast After Report Of Gas Leak
With skyrocketing electrical rates, I think there's going to be a lot of guys doing their own gas installations...swapping out HW tanks, dryers, ranges.
 

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That range is classed as domestic which has different standards than commercial ranges. If my father were alive, he could quote the AGA and UL standards for gas and electric appliances as he was an engineer dealing with commercial and domestic appliances for over 35 years. Check with the dealer for spec's. We replaced our electric range with a gas range- same location and no modification to the cabinets. And my son did the rerouting of the gas line. He is an ME with an extensive background in appliances. I would trust him more than a plumber.
I sold restaurant equipment and supplies for five years. The builder would put in a domestic range, get the inspection, then install the commercial range. After inspection, anything goes. Same with toilets- put in one of the new low-flush toilets, get it inspected, then put on one of the old types. Every notice how long the old toilets last at the curb? People pick them up and replace the new types. My BIL says they leave skid marks.
Found out how to open links! Now I can read Harry's links! Hooray! The last line of the first part is the clincher. The ranges, Wolfe, et al., are not described as commercial or domestic. That would raise the question to me. Commercial gas and electric appliances have a higher BTU or wattage rating than domestic appliances. That is the difference in the standards. Go online and compare the BTU output of a domestic gas range and compare it to the commercial range. You will find there is a big difference.
Edit- The allowable dimensions are for the overhead dimensions. Go back to my previous statements on ratings. BTW, an exhaust hood is to remove heat from the cooking area. Most domestic hoods just circulate the hot air back into the kitchen.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 · (Edited)
I think most of the structure work done. The trim boards are all cut. I have one drawer front and a pocket drawer next to the range to go. There are a few drawer slides left to install also. The rest is finish work. I am refinishing the trim boards in the shop. I decided to use BLO and beeswax as it will match fairly well I think. At least my workbench matches well.

I need to skim the wall with mud. I hate doing mud as I am not very good at it. I am going to try using the magic trowel method I saw on the internet.

I decided to add new hinges to the range. They are on order.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
The last of the construction is done. We made a pocket drawer by the stove to hold cutting boards. The drawer bottom has 2 dove tail wood slides which seems to handle the weight of the large cutting boards. It has a dowel at the back which catches on the maple cabinet side for a stop.

It is all finishing work now. And of course it is raining so the humidity is too high for finish work.

I figured out the BLO and beeswax is not going to work on the doors. The doors are 50 year old wood which is very dry and they soak up too much oil and turn amber in color. I need honey color. I chemically stripped a couple of doors and the old wood has a honey color. I think I have figured out I can use wipe on oil poly as I need a surface finish. The rain is holding me up right now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
I am busy refinishing the lower cabinet doors and drawers with poly. I figured out through trial and error, poly high gloss cut with mineral spirits using 4 coats works well to match everything. I use a ratio of 8 ounces poly and 2 ounces mineral spirits wiping it on with old tee shirts folded up in small pads. The finish is very smooth with no high spots or drips. I strip the doors with a chemical stripper maybe 2 times, and then a light sanding with 220 disc. I use steel wool #0000 lightly before the last coat. I will post pictures once done.

The other interesting thing I figured out was to use my Jet air filter which is very close to my workbench to keep the poly clean. I tried to finish outside on saw horses but I kept getting bugs and what not's in the finish outside. Applying the finish in my shop with the Jet air filter running seems to keep the poly clean. And of course not sanding the day I am applying finish.
 
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