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Hi. Came here as a newbie and am attempting to accomplish the building of a portable kitchen island. This structure has 4x4" corner legs with a 1 1/2 x 3 1/3 braces in what I now know are grooves. I attempted creating the grooves by numerous, close circular saw cuts. Didn't work. So, I decided to learn about the Skill router I've stored in the basement for about ten years. I have never (before today) attempted to use a router and I have never seen anybody else use one. Online I was advised a "jig" would be helpful. I built a jig, but even with clamps I have not the imagination to picture how to set up a path that doesn't have an angle that not including a zero or five. My local hardware store said they couldn't do it. I have now spent more money than I would have if I had just purchased a mobile island. I'm hoping somebody can point me to an instruction or video of somebody effectively accomplishing what I am trying to do. If I knew somebody who did this kind of thing, I would ask for assistance. I want to cut a 3.5", 1.5" deep groove across 4 4x4's. I'm in Chicago, near north. Any suggestions (other than learn to knit?) Thanks.
:confused: :help: :confused:
 

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Buddy I'm having a hard time visualizing what you are trying to attempt. You can post pictures or drawings (scanned images) as long as they are in your hard drive. I know the answer isn't complicated if we can understand what you are trying to do.
 

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Buddy,

I need a little more information on your design. I understand you have 4 x 4 vertical posts which will be connected with 2 x 4 rails. The question I have is are the rails centered on the posts, or aligned with the edges?

If you are centering them, then you can accomplish it a couple of different ways. You can use an Edge guide and plow the groove out, you can use a mortising base plate and plow out the groove, or you can make a template and use a template guide bushing or a pattern bit.

If you have a router table (which you can make for nothing from scrap) you can use a straight bit with a fence and position your groove.

I will add some pictures and try to grab some more when I get back home
 

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Doug
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I have now spent more money than I would have if I had just purchased a mobile island. I'm hoping somebody can point me to an instruction or video of somebody effectively accomplishing what I am trying to do. Any suggestions (other than learn to knit?) Thanks.
:confused: :help: :confused:
Welcome to the wonderful world of Do-it-yourself :wink: There are many of us who have done the same. However, when you get to the point that you create something for yourself or your home that is unavailable in a store, it is worth it.
 

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Welcome Buddy...
1st off as the new guy on the router we have some reading for you that you may find very helpful at this link...
 

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now for you dado...
dadoes are cross grain and groves are w/ the grain...

here are some ideas for jigs...
Hint:
use your circular saw and a chisel to remove/hog out the bulk of the material and the router to clean up the dado...

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Great post, Stick! Nicely illustrated.
I'm wondering if what Buddy is trying to do is rabbet across the end of the legs to carry 2x4 cross members?
I think what he has are likely S4S 4x4s ...actually 3.5" x 3.5" +/-
 

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Great post, Stick! Nicely illustrated.
I'm wondering if what Buddy is trying to do is rabbet across the end of the legs to carry 2x4 cross members?
I think what he has are likely S4S 4x4s ...actually 3.5" x 3.5" +/-
thought the same...
he could improve the joint a bit and make a blind half lap...
or go for beauty and strength w/ a blind half lap dovetail..

.
 

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let's raise the bar...

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Here's a general routing video. Not bad. The illustration is of a simple jig for cuttng dados or grooves. Clamp it in place so the fixed end runs right on the line for the top of the groove or dado, place a piece the same thickness as what you want to glue into the dado/groove. I always add a thick piece of paper, an old glossy political mailing will do. Then bring the bottom movable part up against the edge of the piece you're going to glue into the dado/groove. This will deliver a well fitted exact width opening.

The bit for this should be smaller in diameter than the width of the dado. It should have a top mounted bearing as shown. I prefer to use a fairly short bit and make several passes. The bit must produce a nice flat bottom. You will make one pass with it with the bearing up against the top guide, then pull it down and across the bottom guide. Simple, precise. Make 3 passes, no more than 1/8th at per pass. The bearing must remain against the guide so I'd make the guide of at least half inch stock. The illustrated jig requires that the top be attached to the side rails at an exact 90 degree angle. Or, if it's off slightly, oversized to you can clamp the top piece to the work piece.

Finally, since you're new to this woodworking habit, I've attached a fairly long PDF of the 17 plus things that accelerated my learning curve. It may help you avoid some costly missteps. It has lots of pictures.

Here's the video:

Here's a drawing of the jig, and a picture of a mortising bit you use for fairly shallow flat bottom dados. I disagree on the bit sets. But if you get a set, make sure it has the bit you need for cutting flat bottom dados. Freud makes great general purpose bits.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
More Information

Okay, here is the plan. I attempted the "multiple pass" approach and I now have two possible fence posts for next spring. I live in a condo. I have some power tools, but not workroom. I did construct a "jig" I can't post the URL that would demonstrate this simple jig, but it's on youtube and is two pieces of 3/4" plywood with a guide along the tops.
It was then that I read about the differences in a dado, groove etc. I think my "project" is a groove and the jig I made doesn't have any application that I can visualize. I'm going back to do the suggested reading now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks, Chuck. The jig looks good (except I'd have to know how to create the dados). I need a class or to be able to watch somebody work with this tool. The woodworking classes around here are all more than a hundred dollars and I don't have that now....besides I'll, no doubt, need more money to save the money I'm not saving.
 

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Buddy; are there any woodworking clubs where you are?
There aren't many retirees who do woodworking that wouldn't mind helping you out in this steep learning curve phase.
Illinois

Capital Area Woodworkers
Springfield, IL
Email: [email protected]
Website: Capital Area Woodworkers ? Getting together to share knowledge and ideas.

Chicago Woodturners
Meetings at:
Woodcraft Supply
1280 E. Dundee Road
Palatine, IL 60074
Contact: Paul Shotola
Phone: 847-412-9781
Website: Chicago Woodturners

DuPage Woodworkers Club
Glen Ellyn, IL
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.dupagewoodworkers.org

Fox Valley Woodworkers Club, Inc.
PO Box 1041
Batavia, IL 60510-1041
Phone: 630-879-8756
Email: [email protected]
Website: Fox Valley Woodworkers

Hickory Hills Woodworking Club
Oak View Community Center
4625 W. 111th Street
Oak Lawn, IL 60453
Contact: Ray Thuman
Email: [email protected]

Knox County Homework Shop Club
1 Gilbert Park
Knoxville, IL 61448
Phone: 309-289-4343

Windy City Woodturners
Downers Grove Municipal Facility
5101 Walnut Ave
Downers Grove, IL
Contact: Tom Waicekauskas
Email: [email protected]
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Apparently what I am attempting to do (as explained by DaninVan) is: I'm wondering if what Buddy is trying to do is rabbet across the end of the legs to carry 2x4 cross members?
I think what he has are likely S4S 4x4s ...actually 3.5" x 3.5" +/-
 

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Built Like a Brick........

Apparently what I am attempting to do (as explained by DaninVan) is: I'm wondering if what Buddy is trying to do is rabbet across the end of the legs to carry 2x4 cross members?
I think what he has are likely S4S 4x4s ...actually 3.5" x 3.5" +/-
Buddy; just hit the quote button on the bottom of the comment you want to use text from...it'll do all the copying/pasting for you.
 

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The plans do not show,but it looks like the Olive and Sky blue top rails are attached with pocket holes. They do not show any mortise and tenons, and the are not flush with the outside of the post, which makes for a tricky pocket hole attachment. The rail will have to be raised when it is attached to the leg.

Herb

Correction, I just reread the plans and in the text they do say pocket hole screw attachment. Just another tool to buy.
There is nothing to say you can"t deviate from the plan and utilize what tools you have to do the job.
 

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Doug
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make your own pocket hole jig..
but lets help the man do some easy to do joinery and improve his skill set...
and accomplish a much better/stronger finished project...

.
 

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