Router Forums banner

1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,535 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
April weather in February caused us to grill hamburgers for dinner tonight. Whilst eating, SWMBO looked at the Hellmann's Mayonnaise jar, and after reading "refrigerate after opening", the next sentence said "store in refrigerator door". We've pretty much always stored it on one of the shelves, just because we usually have 6 to 8 salad dressings in the door at any time.

So...the question of the day is...WHY store mayonnaise in the door? The whole fridge is cold--I can't imagine enough variance in temperature to make a difference. The "jar" is plastic, so if we knock it off a shelf it's not likely to break (though the more product, the more likely the plastic would split--no matter what it is). The catsup, mustard, BBQ sauce, and at least 4 bottles of salad dressing gave no direction on where specifically to store in the refrigerator.

Hopefully it's not as serious as removing the tag from a mattress, but curious minds want to know--why does Hellmann's want their mayo in the door? Is it only Hellmann's, or do other brands of mayo give the same directive?? What about Miracle Whip Salad Dressing???

Finally--we've only been empty-nesters for 6 months, and we've sunk to this as dinner conversation. Should we advise Dear Abby of our dire straits????

It's a lively Friday night at our house!! :wink:
earl
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,625 Posts
Earl, LMAO...I'm pretty sure you take the award for the most serious question about the most non-serious subject...you presented the issue in a "George Carlin'ish" / "Tim Allen" sort of way...

Loved it...

Having said that, I think they want us to put it in the door so that it gets used and you buy another one. If you put it on a shelf it will eventually wind up at the back of the shelf and be "out of sight, out of mind"...and something else will take its place on the door...

Fun question, thanks...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
502 Posts
Oh no, this is really serious. You see mayonnaise is egg yolks, oil and a touch of lemon...all combined to make a spread that tastes really good (and the associated chemicals to keep it stable). So it you store it in the door it's makes it easier to get to. Plus you are much more likely to see it & grab it and use it...it's all marketing on the label. Use more, they sell more. I keep mine in the door always, but then I like it a lot and use it on just about anything!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,535 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Good theory Nick (echoed by Quenten)--but I don't think so. You see, mayonnaise--and relish for that matter--is kind of like an oscillating multi-tool. I may not use it every day, or even often...but when it's time to use it there is NO substitute. Being out of mayo on the day after Thanksgiving or Easter is like not having my Fein multi-tool on the day I need to remove a sill plate or a single porcelain tile. No matter how far I have to dig--turkey sandwich or egg salad just can't be made without it!! ;>)

earl
 

·
Super Moderator
David
Joined
·
3,572 Posts
Fun question, indeed. We keep ours in the door but don't use it often. However, even though we keep our fridge at 37° we have noticed that there are a couple of places in the back on certain shelves and in one drawer where we occasionally see ice form and occasionally see vegetables lightly freeze. Maybe they don't want the Mayo freezing if this is a common thing in the refrigerator world...?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,456 Posts
Earl

According to Steven and Chris (they were a Canadian couple, on CBC TV and partners in real life - one of them passed away a couple of years ago), the fridge door is the warmest part of the fridge and should be reserved for items that are least likely to spoil; mayo, ketchup, mustard, relish, etc.

However, like you, we keep our mayo on the top shelf, and even though it ends up at the back, when we need to use it, we know where it is so it's never forgotten.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,427 Posts
Oh no, this is really serious. You see mayonnaise is egg yolks, oil and a touch of lemon...all combined to make a spread that tastes really good (and the associated chemicals to keep it stable). So it you store it in the door it's makes it easier to get to. Plus you are much more likely to see it & grab it and use it...it's all marketing on the label. Use more, they sell more. I keep mine in the door always, but then I like it a lot and use it on just about anything!
lol , I think you summed it up :grin:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,535 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
I'm going to accept Vince & David's thoughts on temp--makes sense.

Just goes to show that "read the manual" even applies to condiments!! Who would have thought???
earl
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,352 Posts
We've been empty nesters over 12 years. That discussion sounds exciting. Now you know what to expect.

Took about 3 days to get used to it. Dull, boring, and old ain't all bad. Nothing happened today. Great news!!
You know it'll be a good day, just cause you woke up.

And you got to use the mayo up in a reasonable amount of time, cause it will go bad in time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,186 Posts
Here in the Southern warmer States, many people will not eat picnic salads that have mayonaise in them "because it goes bad quickly in the heat". I hear this often every Summer.

Then I watched a show that showed how mayonaise was made. The plant manager insisted that it isn't the mayonaise that is going bad in the salads quickly from the heat, it's the potatoes and some of the other vegetables that goes bad quickly if it's not kept refrigerated. The oil will separate out of it when it gets hot, but it's supposed to still be safe to eat. I think I believe him more than these old ladies.

What has this got to do with woodworking? It's a fun question though. Yes, we keep the mayonaise jar in the door.

Charley
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,988 Posts
...and I'm now laughing at myself because I read every comment.

During the War in Vietnam, mayonnaise was NOT TO BE USED - reason: IT IS AN EXCELLENT medium for growing bacteria. I don't eat the stuff, just that thought is enough to make me lose my lunch. I'm pretty certain though, that the make-up of mayonnaise has been improved.

I gotta get back to what I was doing before embarking on this story about MAYONNAISE!

Otis Guillebeau from Auburn, Georgia
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,771 Posts
I have never given it a second thought. Most of the time, it depends on where there is available space in the fridge - either in the door or on a shelf.

I am not falling for the "door is warmer" stuff. Maybe it is. Our refrigerator has a place in the door for 2 gallons of milk (or whatever). Push a button and part of the door opens allowing access to the milk, water and sodas stored there. Close it and open the door for access to the inside stuff.

The way I see it, heat rises. If you want the coldest place to keep something, put it on the bottom shelf. But mine is currently on the top shelf beside the jelly. Easy to get to and no bending over!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,651 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,264 Posts
.... I don't eat the stuff, just that thought is enough to make me lose my lunch.
what...
you don't put it on your fries???
oh the shame..
 
  • Like
Reactions: swarfmaker

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
19,238 Posts
The Dutch use mayo on their fries, something like "Frites mit mayonaise." The Belgians, however, insist that they invented fries. But it bears little resemblance to American mayo. Last time I was in Amsterdam, however, I couldn't handle how rich the stuff was. Our mayo lives on a shelf. Shelf? That could be wood related even if they're metal, right? Us guys and gals just want to have fun, right?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,535 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
Hey Tom--I managed to sneak an oscillating multi-tool in one of the posts, so sure a shelf can be wood-related!! And any nation that can come up with a waffle that can be topped with (or mit) whipped cream is welcome to claim the invention of Belgian Fries--though I prefer mine thin and with salt only.

earl
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,145 Posts
I don't know the answer to the question and just want to chime in on the empty-nester thing. Our youngest has been out of the house now for 11 years or so. I miss them when they don't visit often enough, but I do like the quiet house mighty well. Takes a bit to adjust, but once you do you'll love it.
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top