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Discussion Starter #1
Let me write a few words by way of introduction.

When non-woodworking people say, hmmm, using power tools is not really woodworking, is it? ... I say, have you ever used a hand-held router? You need all the hand skill that a chisel requires, and more.

I have always worked with an Elu MOF96, made in Switzerland, must have had it for 30 years now. And I always only use it hand-held. Oh wot a shame: I am not allowed to attach a photo of some huge-scale fluting I did recently. Timbers 15x15cm and more than 2m long. Hard to imagine handling that across a router table.

I love the way this little machine fits in my hands, how you can so easily see and feel what it is doing. And of course I do by now know it very well. Just a week ago, the sound turned scratchy, so I took it straight round to my very excellent local tool shop. I now live in the poorest part of the south of France, where services are relatively thin on the ground. This tool shop is the exception: one half super-pro sharpening service (includes router bits), the other half a thoughtful selection of well-priced professional power tools, heavy on Festool as you might imagine. They fixed my router the same afternoon - new brushes, and they actually had them in stock.

The owner called out to me, hey, it really is time you stuck that thing in a showcase and bought one of these (Festool). Well, one day I suppose I will have to. But not today or tomorrow.

When I cut mouldings, my weapon of choice is most often the radial arm saw with Delta cutters mounted in an extra-large cutter head. Much more versatile than the router if you are going for a special profile that requires a number of passes with different cutters set at different angles (in which respect the radial arm saw is unbeatable). This goes some way to explain my relatively restricted use of the router.

Have I said enough? Probably too much. Thank you for listening.

Mark
 

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Welcome to the forum. You and I can share "newbie" stories together...I only joined the forum a few days ago.

You're fortunate to have a competent tool repair facility in your locality. In the US we usually have to send our power tools off to some big, impersonal, often barely competent jobber and wait weeks for service.

I looked up the Elu router on the Internet and from the pictures it appears to be a fairly large plunge router similar to my Porter Cable 7529, the size and power of which frighten me a little. If you can do good quality work operating it hand-held, good on ya, mate (as the Aussies might say). I assume to do a fluting job with it you had a makeshift fence that you had to move frequently and carefully realign. That kind of job is why I'm building a router table.
 

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Hello Mark welcome to the forum.
You can post pictures provided they are in your own computer.
 

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Hello, Mark...welcome...

I appreciate your description of how you know your tool...as if it were an extension of your hand...

Keep it running as long as you can...Best of luck with it...
 

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Mark:
I would ask them same people if they cut their lawns with a rotary lawn mower, or cook their meals over an open campfire, perhaps walk to work/school uphill both ways.

Welcome to the forum - I look forward to your involvement and more of your thoughts.

BTW - feel free to post pictures, as long as their are no electrical cords involved in the process :)

Vince
 

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G'day Mark, welcome to the forum.

It might be an idea to update your profile as it currently shows you living in United States, not France...
 

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G'day Mark, welcome to the forum.

It might be an idea to update your profile as it currently shows you living in United States, not France...
Welcome to the forum, Mark.

Looking forward to some photos.

Bill
 

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Welcome to the forum Mark.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks to all of you for your kind words. I can post a photo? Here:

Heroic fluting, done with one of the small selection of cutters that I bought with the machine, all of thirty years ago. Jolly expensive by today's Chinese standards, and this was the first time I had ever used this cutter seriously. Someone suggests I must have used a 'makeshift' fence. Do you mind? My router comes armed with a very fine micro-adjustable fence, all cast metal parts, not what you'd get these days, etc, etc. And it is surely not the bulky Elu that someone says they found on the Net. The standard for this one was just 1/4in collet/shank, though I now also have an 8mm alternative collet. And it works just fine with that extra diameter.

Yes, I will correct my profile, I promise.

Mark
 

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I assume to do a fluting job with it you had a makeshift fence that you had to move frequently and carefully realign. That kind of job is why I'm building a router table.
Actually, the picture shows there are only 3 flutes per side.
I made a fireplace surround years ago using the same technique.

Both outer flutes are symmetrical (same distance from the edge).
Set that distance with your fence, do both outer edges on all pieces, reset the fence to do the center flute.

That only involves moving the fence 1 time.
 

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Welcome Guardoff. I like posts like this and the comments that follow, for example vchiarelli's hints on fluting. Really helpful stuff, and it reveals a little about your personality. My late dad's family comes from the farming country of south eastern France. Not sure I'll ever get there to see it, and the family is now very disconnected.
 

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Hi Mark. :)

Nice fluting job.
 

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Welcome Mark. Glad to have you here. Please tell/show more of your work.
 

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Mark I see you have a Festool cordless drill . I was liking the right angle attachment they have for it. Does it work well?

Aftermarket ones are basically useless IMO
 

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Discussion Starter #19
"That only involves moving the fence 1 time."

Quite so, Vince. Especially since I had seven posts to flute, nine faces in all, 27 flutes ... The real puzzle to overcome was the wayward action of a half-round cutter like this one – what put me off using it those many years ago. But now I understand, or anyway accept, the importance of routing in the correct direction, even when the whole cutter is working within the width of the work. So one side of the cutter is inevitably cutting in the 'wrong' direction. In which case you'd have thought the direction of your pass would have made no difference. But no. The side of the cutter furthest from the fence must be turning in the direction of your pass. That way, the fence hugs the work. Other way, it most definitely does not. We live and learn.

Cheers
Mark
 

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
Yes, Rick, the Festool right-angle attachment works very well. As does the attachment that tackles holes/screws in tight corners. See photo (the thing in the middle). The right-angle attachment accepts Festool's neat little Centrotec chuck and the drill bits sold to match it (seen here with a countersinking bit). Tight-corner attachment has the standard five-sided screwdriver bit drive, for which Festool supplies short brad-point bits, like the one shown. On the right is the Festool screwdriver handle I just bought as a treat, when the cheapo handle I had since the beginning of time did finally break. Centrotec again. Expensive for what it is but, gosh, it's so pretty. Like everything from Festool.

Mark
 
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