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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,
What would be the possible methods and cutters to use to make a cheese board like in attached? I have a Record Power cast iron router table with a sliding table is fitted with a Dewalt 625 1/2" router, as in attached. I also have another 1/2" router about the same spec and a much smaller one about 1100 watts I think it is. Timber size, 255 long 190 wideand 15mm deep.
Thanks
 

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David - Machinist in wood
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That's going to be easier with a plunge router than a router table.

David

Edit - a quick search and there are dozens of videos on this, so here's one below
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
" That's going to be easier with a plunge router than a router table. " Thats what was thinking too. Which YouTube search term did you use?
Cheers.

" Try looking at bowl and tray bits. Then it is a matter of using a template to define the boundaries of the recesses "
Ok thanks, info on using templates for this or likely to find on the YouTubes?

Cheers.
 

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David - Machinist in wood
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" That's going to be easier with a plunge router than a router table. " Thats what was thinking too. Which YouTube search term did you use?
Used Google, went to Videos, picked a short one for example (watched it first, too! :grin:) - Router serving tray diy

David
 

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Doug
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I would use a template guide bushing and a shop made template. I would define the outside boundary first, then use a ski or sled type of arrangement to clean the bottom.

The first bit I would use for the boundary is an uncut spiral, set in a little from the edge to hog out a bunch of the waste and make things easier on the bowl and tray bit. After that, use the bowl and tray bit to define the perimeter.

Then make a simple sled using a board that will span the platter, and use the spiral bit to hog out the majority of the waste. Put the bowl and tray back in, set it just shy of the depth you made the perimeter, and finish off the bottom. The nice thing about the bowl and tray bit is that it leaves a lot nicer finish than a straight cutter.

If I weren't stuck out here at sea I would show you my setup... hopefully I am describing it OK
 

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David,

Thanks for sharing that. It's something I will try. I have slabs of Walnut that I'm sure will look good after a few practice runs.

Dan
 

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I would use a template guide bushing and a shop made template. I would define the outside boundary first, then use a ski or sled type of arrangement to clean the bottom.

The first bit I would use for the boundary is an uncut spiral, set in a little from the edge to hog out a bunch of the waste and make things easier on the bowl and tray bit. After that, use the bowl and tray bit to define the perimeter.

Then make a simple sled using a board that will span the platter, and use the spiral bit to hog out the majority of the waste. Put the bowl and tray back in, set it just shy of the depth you made the perimeter, and finish off the bottom. The nice thing about the bowl and tray bit is that it leaves a lot nicer finish than a straight cutter.

If I weren't stuck out here at sea I would show you my setup... hopefully I am describing it OK
I agree with Doug`s method. Establish the outline and then remove all the waste in the center with a sled. Sleds are handy for leveling difficult surfaces too. You don`t need a large one for a cheese tray but size is up to you. Here`s a video of one being built and it`s similar to one I built years ago to flatten my workbench after I constructed it by laminating 2 x lumber together.
 
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