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My friend gave me an older Craftsman router table. I have a Mikita 3612 BR I bought 30 years ago and will be attempting to mount it in the table. Will this be possible? The table plate holes do not match router base plate holes, not a surprise. Any help will be greatly appreciated.
 

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You’re hitting the old vs. new router designs - the older ones not having been designed for table use is all too often. not sure what you can do unless the base can be removed and modified to a lift or table plate. Prepare for an upgrade...
 

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Welcome N/A...

remove the sub-base from the Makita...
lay it on the table... the side of the plate that fixes to the router's base will be the down side...
line up the center large holes in the sub-base and table really well...
mark the screw holes...
drill the holes and countersink for FH screws...
if the table lacks thickness, epoxy flat fender washers (large OD is preferred) as needed to the under side of the table to gain thickness..
install the router base w/o the sub-base...

JUst in case N/A we've put some helpful information together at this here link to help you get up and running in the world of routers... We hope it to be useful to you... Enjoy...
do take some time and read the safety PDF's... PLEASE!!!
Blood and trips to the ER, we find, are very annoying... Not to mention – expensive...
 

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I had an old Sears table that was stamped steel and had the pattern for one of their routers at the time. If it's that one it's going to be hard. If it's a plastic one that came later it might be easier but you'll still need to be able to countersink the screws in.
 

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I had an old Sears table that was stamped steel and had the pattern for one of their routers at the time. If it's that one it's going to be hard. If it's a plastic one that came later it might be easier but you'll still need to be able to countersink the screws in.
the washers (or one thick one) comp for the top's thinness and you still can CS...
 
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the washers (or one thick one) comp for the top's thinness and you still can CS...
The countersink holes were stamped into the metal. You'd have to be able to pound them into the surface. For most people that wouldn't be an easy job. It was a real piece of cheap crap anyway. You needed to either screw it down or clamp it down and if you pushed on it too hard it would torque the top.
 
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G'day Dave, welcome to the forum.
 

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The countersink holes were stamped into the metal. You'd have to be able to pound them into the surface. For most people that wouldn't be an easy job. It was a real piece of cheap crap anyway. You needed to either screw it down or clamp it down and if you pushed on it too hard it would torque the top.
Drill the hole and install the washer(s)... (ID is the same as the screw's OD)...
CS the hole...
part of CS is in the table and washer gives you the rest of the thickness the CS requires and no dimple to contend w/...
using a large OD fender washers distribute surface tension...
 

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If it is the stamped metal table then it was a pretty small table if I recall. I wouldn't spend too much time trying to get it to work. The table is really too small to be much of a help. It would be easier to just get a sink cut out and mount the router to that. In the end, it would be easier and although not really good it would be better than the Craftsman table.
 

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My friend gave me an older Craftsman router table. I have a Mikita 3612 BR I bought 30 years ago and will be attempting to mount it in the table. Will this be possible? The table plate holes do not match router base plate holes, not a surprise. Any help will be greatly appreciated.
Do what stick said, the router you have is old but a very nice one, I still have mine and it still works great. N
 

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Welcome to the forum Dave. Of course someone like me was going to suggest that you take a picture of the table and post it for us to see what you're working with. Makes things easier and cleaner. I had 2 of those Craftsman metal router tables and I can tell you that it was more of a pia then any help. Not very stable so only the smallest pieces of wood could be done and even then too much vibration. You need and want something stable that you can secure, clamp if need be, and have rigid enough to be able to press the wood against the fence without moving the fence or table. It would be far better to take a flat piece of wood, maybe plywood, mark your router plate holes, drill, countersink, and secure the router in that manner. For a fence you can use a simple but straight say 1-2" thick solid board clamped. That would be the simplest table I'd use and of course that would likely need to be clamped to keep it secure while using.

On the other hand if you know this is something you're really going to do a lot there are other options. For me I built my cabinet. They can be very simple to extremely elaborate. I used the plans from here which includes the homemade fence. For mine I simply built the cabinet and bought the fence, table top, and lift. And mine gets a ton of use. Best shop project I've done if you ask me. I also made it mobile for ease of moving it. Or you could spend a good deal more and just buy a complete router table with/without lift, dust collection, split/solid fence, etc...
 

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Welcome to the forum Dave. Of course someone like me was going to suggest that you take a picture of the table and post it for us to see what you're working with. Makes things easier and cleaner. I had 2 of those Craftsman metal router tables and I can tell you that it was more of a pia then any help. Not very stable so only the smallest pieces of wood could be done and even then too much vibration. You need and want something stable that you can secure, clamp if need be, and have rigid enough to be able to press the wood against the fence without moving the fence or table. It would be far better to take a flat piece of wood, maybe plywood, mark your router plate holes, drill, countersink, and secure the router in that manner. For a fence you can use a simple but straight say 1-2" thick solid board clamped. That would be the simplest table I'd use and of course that would likely need to be clamped to keep it secure while using.

On the other hand if you know this is something you're really going to do a lot there are other options. For me I built my cabinet. They can be very simple to extremely elaborate. I used the plans from here which includes the homemade fence. For mine I simply built the cabinet and bought the fence, table top, and lift. And mine gets a ton of use. Best shop project I've done if you ask me. I also made it mobile for ease of moving it. Or you could spend a good deal more and just buy a complete router table with/without lift, dust collection, split/solid fence, etc...
I agree with Steve largely for the sake of safety - make whatever you mount that motor a stable platform and consider how you will use it. If simple, occasional work is all you intend, spend as little as possible. If you plan on some serious usage, money spent on a table/cart and lift are wise investments. Will speed your work process and minimize tool handling/setup, especially with all manual table control configurations. Wish youthe best for your routing future!
 
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