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V bits

  • I would purchase a longer/larger diameter 60° V bit for making hexagon miters.

    Votes: 3 10.3%
  • I would purchase a longer/larger diameter 67.5° V bit for making octogon miters.

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • I would purchase both a 60 and a 67.5° V bit.

    Votes: 12 41.4%
  • I would not use these bits

    Votes: 14 48.3%
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Discussion Starter #1
The quickest way to make accurate mitered corners is to use a V bit. At this time V bits long enough to cut a 3/4" board only come in 90° profiles. Birds mouth bits allow you to join wood in a hexagon or an octogon and they work just fine. The only problem is you can not easily reinforce this type of joint with a spline running the length of the material. You can cut the required angles using a table saw or bandsaw but it is real easy for them to be slightly off resulting in a poor fitting joint.

If V bits were available in lengths that would allow cutting a 3/4" board to the 30 and 22.5° angles (resulting in a perfect miter) would you be interested?
 

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These have a 1" cutting length in 45*, 30* and 22.5*
MLCS
Just isolate the bearing.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Yes, all of these sets will allow you to cut the angles in two steps. The V bits allow you to do so in one step and give you the option to reinforce with a spline or not. They can also be used for sign work or decorative cuts. Please post your thoughts on this.
 

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I spoke with a Whiteside rep at a woodworking show about the 90 degree bits. He said that like everything in life, the angle on a bit has tolerance. Whiteside will sort for a perfect degree choice at $10 additional charge. He told me that some production shops order 91 degree sorted bits so the tips are guaranteed to mesh during clamping. I would expect every wood cutting router bit to have a tolerance.

For joints that are 3" or less, I use my Incra SE1000 on the table saw and cut the stock vertically. The angles are good enough to just using blue tape for glue up.

CNC use multiple passes to get the 90 degree on thicker stock with 3 axis.

Steve.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Yes Steve, there are many ways to make the cuts. They could also be done with a radial arm saw, a miter saw, a circular saw, any number of different jig designs.

What I am trying to get feedback on are two specific bit designs. These bits will make the cut in one step and they also can be used for other tasks as mentioned above. The reason for this poll is to find out if people are interested in these two bits which will be produced if there is a strong enough interest. A manufacturer is monitoring this poll to decide if they should proceed with the design. This is a chance for members to speak their mind on a specific design. I appreciate that everyone is providing alternative methods.

The question in hand is a simple one; if they make it will you buy it?
 

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Mike - I think you need to change the poll wording a bit. While I voted no, it was just because I don't have a need for those angles. A more fair poll would be to have people who do use those angles or have a use in mind that isn't practical now, if they would buy at the increased cutting length.

I do have the MLCS Multi-Sided Glue Joint Set, which has those angles. I use it to make larger columns that I wouldn't want to try clamping without the location feature.

Steve.
 

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i am like steve. if or when i find myself with a need for something like that, i would definately be interested in bits like that.

but at the moment, the need is not there for me.
 

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I am confused, Mike. The bits I cited (don't know about the CMT bits) will cut the angle in one pass, or are you talking about cutting through a board to yield two matching angles? My understanding of a "V" bit is an angled cutter without a bearing.
 

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Mike...

I do a good bit of 45/22.5's. Pretty much all done with a hand plane on a shooting board with excellent results! Nearly 100 such joints in the chess table I recently posted. Time savings alone would merit serious consideration. Would I buy a couple of router bits that do the same thing? Yes I would as long as they:

1: were affordable. I don't mean cheap, but reasonably priced. I'll site the Whiteside bits offered up here a short while back. From all accounts a fantastic set of bits. But out of reach for most. Being made available in a set may help curb costs..

2: were durable enough to last longer than a few cuts. Have to be able to be resharpened at least a few times.

3: leaving behind a quality cut. No fuzzies, no chipouts without the use of backers.

4: has to be available in a 1/2" shank.

5: has to be able to "easily" handle up to 3/4" stock, 4/4 would be nicer yet...

The big problem I've had with such bits is not so much the angle being a problem as its been getting the boards to be the "E X A C T" identical length. Thats no a bit issue I know but a user problem *L*......

b.
 

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Hi Mike & Others - I had to vote 'No' since my only interest (at the moment) would be to produce 45 degree miters - now having said that what 1/2" shank router bits used in a router table would be the best options for board thicknesses from 1/4" to 3/4"?

Need to check what I now own, but would like to give this option a try - thanks for suggestions! Dave :)
 

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Hi Mike & Others - I had to vote 'No' since my only interest (at the moment) would be to produce 45 degree miters - now having said that what 1/2" shank router bits used in a router table would be the best options for board thicknesses from 1/4" to 3/4"?

Need to check what I now own, but would like to give this option a try - thanks for suggestions! Dave :)

Dave.. the Sommerfield bits bob mentions above (45*lock miter) do a real nice job! A little bit of a learning curve for setup but well worth it. They offer a easy set jig that makes setup a snap. The only thing I don't like about em is the little "tail" that runs the length of the joint and shows up at the top of the corners. This is however one of the advantages of the joint, excellent glue surfaces. Essentially a tongue and grove mitered joint.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Gene, What I am talking about is making one cut along a line resulting in two matching edges.

Bill, these would be quality 1/2" shank bits with the express purpose of making matching miter cuts but would also handle the functions of a regular V bit of the same angle: sign making, decorative cuts... a longer bit that allows you to perform more jobs for a small difference in price from a regular V bit. Most people already use/own V bits, this simple change makes a great deal of sense to me. I can see photos are needed to better explain the concept so I am heading out to the shop to take a couple.
 

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I follow ya now Mike... just a big V bit...more or less... The "V" aspect of things I'd have little use for, but as you stated, for those making signs and the like, I can see a market for em.

The big sell would have to be what would be gained by having such a large bit...
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I think this image will explain the difference in the proposed bit design well enough. You can see how the bits have different point lengths and diameters. The bits are just longer/wider versions of V bits designed for miter folding. (The ones in the photo are not designed for miter folding)

Miter folding is a technique used by many forum members to make boxes; Harry posted a nice set of how to photos for this process.

Is the idea getting clearer now? This one requires very carefully chosen words and I have failed at that.
 

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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
Dave, odds are you already own a V bit; most sets include one. For a V bit to be of maximum use to you it should be able to cut the entire thickness of material you plan to use so you would need a V bit with a point length of 3/4". In the example above that would be the 1508 bit. That bit will allow you to make 45° cuts on the edge of materials up to 3/4" thick. You can also use it to put a chamfer on the edge of a board; to make a groove in a table apron for screws to attach it to the table top; sign making, decorative uses. There are V bits designed to make one pass across a board and let you fold the board to make a perfect 90° joint. The two bits mentioned in the poll would let you do the same things or make a 6 sided box or an 8 sided box. They are just longer larger diameter versions of regular V bits.

Thanks BJ, I have that bit and really like it.
 

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I think this pic will help explain the uses, but I would prefer the bearing guided variety as opposed to v groove.
 

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I have voted, Mike.

I note, however, that so far, out of 160+ views only 4 members have indicated they would buy such a bit.

I cannot see a manufacturer tooling up for only 4 sales.....

As many have commented, there are already many ways to skin that cat.....
 
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