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The first thing you need to know is all router tables will work. How well they work depends on the type of jobs you will be doing and your methods. Bob and Rick have taught over the years that "Simple is better" and I agree with them. For a table to be a good one it requires that it is a stable surface to mount your router to. You should be able to easily adjust a fence and remove it. You should have dust collection. Adjustments to your router should be as easy as possible. Low maintenance is a good thing. Do you agree with these points? If so consider these ideas: Cast iron will rust. You will need to do regular maintenance treating with WD-40, wiping the table dry and keeping any liquids away from it. (Too much of a pain for me) Next, if you use a table with a Formica surface it will clean up with a shot of window cleaner and a quick wipe. You can pencil reference marks on this type of top and easily clean them off when done. (I do this often) The fence should remove easily so you can use jigs and template's with a minimum of set up time. (Less set up time = more woodworking enjoyment) If you are not familiar with the Router Workshop table I would encourage you to check it out. Everything is developed as a system and works well. There are holes in the table top to accept jigs for making box joints, rails and stiles, panel raising and special dovetails. The more I study this system the more I am impressed with it. You can view all the Router Workshop items by clicking on the Oak Park link at the top of our home page. Please review these items and then let me know your thoughts.
 

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Cast iron tops are too "high maintenance". You'll have to wipe it from time to time to keep it from rusting, then wipe it down before you can use it. A paste wax works a little better than WD40 for cast iron but, again, you have to wipe on, wipe off. I'd think you'd be better off with something like a mdf, formica, or other sturdy type table top.
 

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The Cast Iron tops seem to be all the rage. I don't get it myself. They just don't lend themselves to jigs etc. Cast Iron is easy to take care of though. A little paste wax on the the top and your good, just like any other CI. I agree with using laminate over a substrate .. just so much more versatile.

Corey
 

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I don’t like the idea of center of the table being concave. A table should be flat. It’s EZ to accidentally put pressure on the outfeed of the workpiece and the middle part where the router bit gets raised. OUCH !
Convace Schmoncave. That’s nonsense.
 

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Well I decided to go the cast iron route myself as my 10" Ridgid table saw has a large wing of empty space and my work space is small. There are no doubts that there are some disadvantages but I hope that I can work them out over time. I am very impressed with General Tools products out of Montréal. Their split router fence and dust shoot are of industrial design and quality and the 29” x 12” cast iron router table came with 2 sets of size rings. The setup cost me$238.00 so far. Disadvantages so far is that I have to get a 1” collets extension as the table thickness and mounting hardware is about ¾” and it came with no T-track on the cast table but I still have room to make one out of MDF and laminate and attach it to the fence rails and cast. I do so love the table space and large fence of the table saw. I bought a nice magnetic power switch for the router setup.
 

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I like cast iron tables on fixed power tools. I hate the cast aluminium tables on bandsaws and tablesaws. I had a planer with an aluminium table and hated it. On the bandsaw there was a terrible sympathetic vibration singing away. I use talc on the cast iron tables to make the wood glide across the table. I have Formica topped router tables.
 

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The planer was an Inca, and they made some good tools. The bandsaw was an Elecra-Beckum, great spec, but what a noise! I bought a second hand cast iron and steel plate Startrite 352. My 10" table saw is a cast iron table Startrite, Both have horrible fences.
 
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