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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I always love doing assorted small boxes. Some more of a challenge than others. The shapes always seem to be pleasing. I enjoy using hardwoods the most. The lighter Oak box was a practise run effort for compound lock-mitre joints. Left over scraps of oak made random panels on this box. It is now used to hold bread sticks and rolls on a friend's table. The oak box is finished with Teak Oil.
The darker jewellery box is Walnut. Also done with compound locking mitre joints, (45* by 5* angle) and finished with 8 coats of Teak Oil, sanded between coats with 800 grt. wet-dry sandpaper. I did these two boxes with only ideas, no plans. The jewellery box is for men's watches and cuff links, etc. This was my most difficult project to date with compound joints as well as the dividers inside. Not Very easy to work with 1/8" pieces. The dividers had to be inserted before the top or bottom panels are glued on. Also: Felt liner, top and bottom had to be glued onto the panel before assembling the top and bottom panel onto the box frame.
I like the locking mitre joints because a good fit makes it much easier to get a square and strong joint that remains durable. I think the secret to such joints is to first make a jig for easy set-up on the router table. I used a 45* lock mitre bit with 1/2" shaft. The 5* angle was first cut on the table saw before doing the lock-mitre joint on the RT. All the edges had to be cut at 5* as well for consistent fit.
 

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nice stuff...thx for sharing...been thinking of one of those bits the more I see and read,,the closer to ordering I get...
 

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Great job on the boxes Reg. Making do with materials on hand I find enjoyable. Just kinda makes you think and look at things a bit differently. Like you, I enjoy doing boxes. Usually I'll get on a roll and knock several out at one time just for the fun of it. I'm always looking for ways to make em just a lil different/unique. I'll also work off the cuff, no plans just an idea. Sometimes I hit it out of the park, other times they serve as a necessary component in the making of smors and hot dogs. *L* But always a lesson learned one way or the other. If I can find my USB cable I'll download the latest batch for ya later on this evening.

You mention felt. do you use the preglued sheets or the blow on felt powder?
 

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Very nice, Reg. I'm assuming you made the handles also. Any tricks you can share about making those? I think I see a project down the line where I could use handles like that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for looking in Oliver. No trick to the handles. Just dumb luck: I was cleaning up some oak scraps from the table saw and happened to put two sticks together, noticing how the wood grain matched up so perfect; I glued the two sticks together and measured out @ 7". I just thought that might make 3 very nice handles @ 2" each. I used a small square and some 5 min. epoxy glue to set the end handles in place.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hi Bill: I just used some felt cloth left over from previous project. Actually I did it all the hard way, using 15 min. contact cement.
Thanks to all of you for looking in. I am really willing to learn a few new tricks too......so "felt powder" is a new one on me! I have used preglued sheets when they are large enough. I have had to buy some of the felt by the meter/yard in the past.
 

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Hi Reg, I see what you mean by being tricky making the thin dividers. I like those. I also like the double set of hinges that you put on the walnut box. Very nice job! Malcolm / Kentucky USA
 

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I like the walnut box-good thing my wife doesn't browse here :lol:
 

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Hi Bill: I just used some felt cloth left over from previous project. Actually I did it all the hard way, using 15 min. contact cement.
Thanks to all of you for looking in. I am really willing to learn a few new tricks too......so "felt powder" is a new one on me! I have used preglued sheets when they are large enough. I have had to buy some of the felt by the meter/yard in the past.
bill reg

Very nice looking boxes Reg. I think what Bill was referring to for the "felt powder" was Flocking. I've never done it myself, but it appears to be a nice alternative to trying to get the material cut so it fits in the box nicely.
 

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Great looking boxes but I am more interested in your walnut boxes. I'm curios with the engineering and construction.
I have failed several times in making boxes with my bandsaw but your work is definitely a fine build. I should also
learn more about box joint build.
 

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Thanks for posting the boxes Reg. I never had the need or desire to try something like this but I think I now do. It does not take much wood, and would be a good way to use scraps that otherwise would go in trash or fireplace. I have lots of scrap for practice.

I checked out the flock video Brian posted. That looks like a good way to avoid problems of fitting material. The few times in the past I have tried to fit in something like that came out very badly. It made the whole thing look worse due to the poor fit. The flock looks like a good alternative that looks rather simple and fool proof. The only hard part for me would be the waiting for the glue to set. Wanting to peek early to see how it is doing.

That brings up the question. What happens if you mess it up (the flock). Probably be a real mess to clean up or maybe just a very thick (2) layer of flock.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks for posting the boxes Reg. I never had the need or desire to try something like this but I think I now do. It does not take much wood, and would be a good way to use scraps that otherwise would go in trash or fireplace. I have lots of scrap for practice.

I checked out the flock video Brian posted. That looks like a good way to avoid problems of fitting material. The few times in the past I have tried to fit in something like that came out very badly. It made the whole thing look worse due to the poor fit. The flock looks like a good alternative that looks rather simple and fool proof. The only hard part for me would be the waiting for the glue to set. Wanting to peek early to see how it is doing.

That brings up the question. What happens if you mess it up (the flock). Probably be a real mess to clean up or maybe just a very thick (2) layer of flock.
Thanks Dave:
I too watched the vid clip about flocking. I don't think it would be practical for this application, since I did not want flocking on the dividers. They were oiled to match the rest of the walnut wood. As I said: the dividers had to be installed before the top and bottom panels were glued into place because of the 5* angle of the sides and ends of the box frame. Even the edges of the top and bottom panels had to be trimmed up @ 5* angles to fit snug without spaces.
 

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Compound Lock Miter Joint

Nice boxes. The beveled sides make for a more interesting look. But a little more difficult to hold constant past the bit I'd have thought.

I'd appreciate a picture of the jig you used for the horizontal and vertical cuts.
 

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Thanks for making that a bit more clear Brian. :) "felt powder"? I'm not really sure what I was thinking...Indeed its referred to as flocking. I use it quite a bit. I go with the materials demonstrated in your video and have had very good success. The colored glues actually make for a more uniform look and applying the flocking with the puffer cans is quite easy. The biggest difference between the peel and stick stuff and the flocking is the feel of the material. The peel and stick has more of a padded feel to it. Available in a great assortment of colors and the stuff goes a lonnnnnnnnnnng way. The small cans of adhesive usually last me a good 4-6 smallish boxes.

Reg... agreed, doing the walnut box with flocking would have been more trouble than its worth. Do'able!!! but alot of tape and ALOT of patience!

If you guys do alot of felt work, give flocking a try.. you may very well be pleasantly surprised..


bill reg

Very nice looking boxes Reg. I think what Bill was referring to for the "felt powder" was Flocking. I've never done it myself, but it appears to be a nice alternative to trying to get the material cut so it fits in the box nicely.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Jig for 5* Angle

Thanks for your interest Fred.
The "jig" for cutting the 5* angle vertical and horizontal on the RT was so simple I didn't keep it. I made it from one piece of scrap; same 1/2" thickness, simply a square scrap cut @ 5*. I use duct tape or masking tape to hold pieces together and run them piece by piece through the cutter. Singular jig piece is simply flipped over for opposing cuts. I did use a sled in conjunction with fence on VERITAS table assy. You can see the entire set up @ LEE VALLEY TOOLS.
I also used the PIN ARM attachment for inlay, to cut out the divot in the top pnl for the engraved name plate.
 

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