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the pic is a clip of my jig that i made I found out that the rail's are to high and need to be taken off so it will work With the rail's on the jig is to high from the work If you Make it the same size from end to end It will work What i found Is that you can shim the work piece up so the bit will cut where you want You have to play around with it tell you get it work Or at least i had to
 

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Hi del

Thanks for the file and I had to do the same as you but I put the sides down on the side of the jig with some slots in them so I could move them up and down and help support the router base in the pass.(see url link in the 1st post)

This jig is one of the good ones from RWS because the slot will always be on dead center of the stock and true to the side of the stock and no clamps needed just the fine adjusting tool that Bob R. as on hand all the time to tap the wedge in place.. :)

As you and I know when you use a ruler it's not always the same when you mark the stock for the slot, I have used and made many mortise jigs but the one that Bob R. came up with is the BEST one I have found, don't need to mark the stock just drop the router on the stock and make the pass, the best part of the jig is when you go to put the parts together they are dead on with no over lap that needs to be sanded down to get it to fit right.
Note*** I also like to use the floating type tenon it's quicker to put in and easyer to do and just as strong plus you can make the tenons on the router table in 24 " long and cut them off to size when I need them.
I use the band saw to make the hardwood 1/4",3/8".1/2" wide blank stock then round them over on the router table.

One users review on this jig, I would give it 5 stars out of 5 stars. :) :)


Bj :)
 

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re: The picture of the mortise jig that "router è ancora il mio nome" sent in the post just before this one.

I just made one like it but used 1/4" hardboard instead of acrylic. This may seem like a dumb question, but without an index line on the jig, what is the recommended method of getting the bit dead on? I have the mortise layed out, and the center of the workpiece dead on, thanks to BobJ's little centering jig. Using look'n'peepers to align the jig doesn't seem too accurate. Thanks.
 

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Hi Falegname

Here's just one more that you may want to take a look at, it's very accurate , it's base on the simple geometry ...any two points the center one will always be dead on center with the other two...it can be used on just about any size :)

No need to mark the stock because it's always dead on but if you want it off set just clamp a scrap board to the stock to move it over to the right spot.

see below

http://www.routerforums.com/jigs-fixtures/6639-mortising-jig.html



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Falegname said:
re: The picture of the mortise jig that "router è ancora il mio nome" sent in the post just before this one.

I just made one like it but used 1/4" hardboard instead of acrylic. This may seem like a dumb question, but without an index line on the jig, what is the recommended method of getting the bit dead on? I have the mortise layed out, and the center of the workpiece dead on, thanks to BobJ's little centering jig. Using look'n'peepers to align the jig doesn't seem too accurate. Thanks.
 

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Hi Bob,
Thanks for your reply.

Based on your recommendation in an earlier posting, I bought one of those bases from Rockler a week ago. Never having used a plunge router, my concern is keeping the base flat on the edge of work piece and the pins snug up against the face while pushing down on the router, especially on a thin board, e.g. 3/4". With practice I'm sure the skill is achieved. Maybe I need some worry beads. :)
 

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Hi James

No worry beads needed :) but practice on some scrap boards would pay off big time it's easy to get the hang of this simple jig , 3 or 4 slots and you will have it down, then it's just like getting on a bike after 10 years or so, once you got it you got it.. :) it's all in the balance ....

You could get some longer pins (bolts ) and used them as training wheels so to speak until you get the hang of it, they do most of the work, keeping it running true and supporting the router from tiping over from one side or the other just like training wheels on a bike so to speak ... :)

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The jig that Router posted does not self center so it requires a careful set up. At the same time, it is capable of working on smaller pieces, using offsets or as an edge guide. The Router Workshop jigs are self centering but lack the other features. It is simple enough to build both and use the one best suited to a particular job.
 
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