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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I thought it would be nice to build a all-in-one plunge router mortise & tenon jig. The jig consists of a plastic sheet mounted on a wooden structure, on which the router moves in four directions. A 4 mm thick plastic sheet was chosen: a. because it very smooth. b. it is thin enough to be strong - and yet does not "steal" too much of the bit cutting length.

As can be seen in the photos + the YouTube link, the travel of the router is limited by three sliding fences, located in specific distances marked on the measure-tapes. Those distances were set regarding the desired length of the mortise (and tenon) and the thickbess of the tenon. The left side is fixed and needs no sliding fence.

To make the mortise, I clamp the stock using two clamps, and move the router from left to right. To make the tenon I clamp the stock using a sliding fence, which guarantees it's perpendicular, and then pull the router towards me, then right, than push onward, then left, always keeping the router base in contact with the fence.

I made the base of the router (using the same plastic sheet) perfectly round, so the distance from the fence to the bit is always the same, no matter the position of my hands holding the router handles.

With some experience I achieved excellent results.

As a newbie in this forum I am not allowed to post the URL. So, if you want to see the jig in action, please search yair_fe in YouTube, and there you'll find the mortise & tenon jig, and two other jigs.
 

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Yair,

VERY VERY NICE jig and well illustrated too. Thanks for taking the time to share it with us.

When you hit the 10 post mark you will be able to post your link as well.

For now I will post it for you so others can get there easily and see your work.

YouTube - mortise&tenon jig
 

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Hi Yairfe,

That is a sweet jig. Very nicely done. :)
 

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Excellent jig Yair and thanks for sharing

The video also was very good for the details

Nicolas
 

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Hello Yairfe Welcome to Router Forums. Very very nice work. It helps a lot to see what you have built when we can see it. Thank you very much, and i am glad you are here.
 

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Hello Yair

Looking at your video again and again I don't understand how you do the settings for a particular size mortise or tenon.

If you have a chance, it will be nice to explain this

Thanks
Nicolas
 

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Hi yairfe

Very Nice job on the jig :)

It's looks like a mix of the Craftsman and the Trend® Mortise & Tenon Jig, I do like jigs alot :), here's a small tip,,,if you use one of the small bar clamps and remove the small stop pin on the end of the bar you will not need to look for it all the time it will just be in the cabinet sticking out..no round hole needed to put it in place just a slot like the Trend type..

http://www.routerforums.com/show-n-tell/10133-birch-m-t-jig.html
http://www.rockler.com/tech/RTD10000037AB.pdf
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I thought it would be nice to build a all-in-one plunge router mortise & tenon jig. The jig consists of a plastic sheet mounted on a wooden structure, on which the router moves in four directions. A 4 mm thick plastic sheet was chosen: a. because it very smooth. b. it is thin enough to be strong - and yet does not "steal" too much of the bit cutting length.

As can be seen in the photos + the YouTube link, the travel of the router is limited by three sliding fences, located in specific distances marked on the measure-tapes. Those distances were set regarding the desired length of the mortise (and tenon) and the thickbess of the tenon. The left side is fixed and needs no sliding fence.

To make the mortise, I clamp the stock using two clamps, and move the router from left to right. To make the tenon I clamp the stock using a sliding fence, which guarantees it's perpendicular, and then pull the router towards me, then right, than push onward, then left, always keeping the router base in contact with the fence.

I made the base of the router (using the same plastic sheet) perfectly round, so the distance from the fence to the bit is always the same, no matter the position of my hands holding the router handles.

With some experience I achieved excellent results.

As a newbie in this forum I am not allowed to post the URL. So, if you want to see the jig in action, please search yair_fe in YouTube, and there you'll find the mortise & tenon jig, and two other jigs.
 

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Very interesting! I've not used YouTube much before and started to explore further. It didn't take long for joints to become joints, if you know what I mean!

Thank you for posting the jig.

Cheers

Peter
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
How are stops caldculated and set?

Hו guys,

Thank you very much for your warm remarks!

I will explain the way I calculate and set the sliding fences. As an example I will take a 32 mm thick stock and a 12 mm bit. With different stock and bit the settings change, but the principle remains the same.

Mortise: As stock is 32 mm - the center line for the mortise will be at 16 mm, and so I set it on the meaure-tape shown in photo 3. The zero line of the tape is 80 mm from the edge of the window opened in the plastic sheet, through which the bit goes down. 80 mm is the radius of the router round base. So, setting the fence at 16 mm brings the bit to the center line.
The stop on the x-axis is set to 30 mm - the full length of the mortise minus the bit diameter (the attached drawing explains it well enough - open it!)

Tenon: For the tenon I make use of a swivelling fence which: a. holds the stock perfectly perpendicular; b. keeps the stock away from the plastic sheet so the bit won't "bite" it. Please have a look at the attachd tenon drawing. This swivelling fence is 12 mm thick.
First (upper) stop on y-axis is set to 16 mm (12 mm for the fence + 4 mm in order to have the bit in place - see drawing). The second (lower) stop is set to 12 mm (fence) +28 mm (bit travel)+ 160 mm (router base diameter) = 200 mm.
Stop on the x-basis (limiting while going to the right) is set to 42 mm (tenon length) + 12 mm (bit diameter= 2 radii) = 54 mm.

In the tenon drawing you can also see the path of the bit, marked by arrows.

Cheers to all,
Yair
 

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Wow...I've been looking for a jig to make both mortises and tenons. I just made my own wooden version of the Mortise Pal (I couldn't see shelling out $190 for it), and I make tenons on my table saw with a Delta tenoning jig. This could be easier...that tenoning jig weighs a ton!
 

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Mortise pal semi-clone

Adam could you post a picture of your jig for us?
Sure - I made it out of scrap 3/4" poplar, scrap 1/4" cherry plywood, some 1/2" oak dowels, and a carriage bolt. Oh, and the knob I carved from a little scrap of cherry, then I carved a space in the back side to insert a wing nut and epoxied that in.

Since it was mostly scrap, I think it cost me all of about $3 to build. There isn't any locking mechanism for the slide, but I drilled the holes in the poplar to fit the oak dowels so tightly that it stays right in place. As you can see I made a few templates to make 1/4" mortises of various lengths. I haven't made any templates for any wider mortises yet, but that should be easy enough.

I think it's a fairly faithful reproduction. Thoughts?
 

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I have never used a Mortise Pal but yours looks pretty close to it. Does the slot fit a guide bushing or just the bit? I would think a bushing was necessary so as not to destroy the template.
 

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I have never used a Mortise Pal but yours looks pretty close to it. Does the slot fit a guide bushing or just the bit? I would think a bushing was necessary so as not to destroy the template.
Great point - it fits a bushing. I tried to build it to match the Mortise Pal, except I made mine a little bit larger (the MP is about 6", mine is 8") for added stability.

Oh, and please pardon the horrible stain-soaked rag in the background. I just finished staining my dresser (you can barely see part of it in the upper right of picture #3), and I just tossed the rag on my TS extension. Oops. :)
 

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Hi Adam

May I offer a suggest :)
If you make the slot 1" wide you can use the brass guide and you can use any router bit you want to use on the jig..:)
Plastic would be best so you can see what you are doing..

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May I offer a suggest :)
If you make the slot 1" wide you can use the brass guide and you can use any router bit you want to use on the jig..:)
Plastic would be best so you can see what you are doing..
Bob - I'm here to get advice, much more than to give it, so I appreciate any advice I can get! :)

All I have is some kind of strange bushing that screws onto the underside of my router baseplate (I'm really jury-rigging this whole jig) and I made the slots the exact width of that bushing to make a 1/4" mortise with a spiral upcut bit. I could always make the slot a little wider and rout the mortise out with the same bit, but the bushing is so narrow only a 1/4" bit will fit through it. I just bought a set of router bushings but haven't opened them yet.

I'm probably going to buy that Freud over at Peachtree Woodworking (going for $119...can't pass that up!) and then I'll sell my other router.

Thanks for the advice!
 
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