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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
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I just getting into using the router for dovetailing (have been doing handmade dovetail for a bit - but need to up the volume of production)

what would ya'll say is the most common or useful dovetail size with respect to diameter/angle/depth of cut

assuming i have the facility to manufacture whatever type of jig i want (on the CNC) so not restricted to Leigh/Keller/incra constraints

i would like to be able to make "normal" size drawers BUT also large type joints for blanket boxes or larger furniture (eg dining table)

ideally i would like to create 2 or 3 "sets" that will serve all these sizes and not have to purchase 5~7 sets

a "set" would consist of a matching dovetail bit and relevant template straight bit o assume

Thank
Mike
 

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1/2" 14° is probably the most common.

With no restrictions, I prefer bits with steeper angles (7°-8°), as they look more like hand cut.

Thicker boards tend to need larger bits, while thinner boards will usually need smaller bits.

Also, through dovetails look better with 7° or 8° bits, while half blind are more commonly cut with higher angles.

The attached pic was done with an 8°, 7/16" diameter bit and 3/16" straight bit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
@ger21

that sure looks great....
i assume the stock in the photo is about 1"thick and 8" wide?

what jig did you use to make these?

I assume the bit needs to be at least as deep the the thickness of the stock more or less

M
 

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I think it's 5/8" stock, about 5" wide.
Done on a CNC.

Yes, for through dovetails, the bit length needs to be more than the stock thickness.
 

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Here's a link to a dovetail/box joint/mortise & tenon jig I made for my CNC. This is a very extensive thread - most of my "from scratch" CNC build. FWIW, it has had 26,792 views. However, the link is to the page with the jig. New Machine Build GME's New 80/20 CNC Build - My Design - Page 20.

I use JointCam for the software. It's very comprehensive. Here's a link to it: JointCAM - CNC Dovetails and Box Joints. JointCam is ger21's creation.

If you are thinking of building an extrusion-based CNC, I recommend my build thread. Yes, I'm biased. It's long, but contains a lot of information. I'm hoping to get it going again in the next couple of months. I've been mostly out of commission for the last several months with a particularly nasty injury. I'm near the one year mark after surgery, but it can take upwards of two years to achieve maximum improvement.
 

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All

I just getting into using the router for dovetailing (have been doing handmade dovetail for a bit - but need to up the volume of production)

what would ya'll say is the most common or useful dovetail size with respect to diameter/angle/depth of cut

assuming i have the facility to manufacture whatever type of jig i want (on the CNC) so not restricted to Leigh/Keller/incra constraints

i would like to be able to make "normal" size drawers BUT also large type joints for blanket boxes or larger furniture (eg dining table)

ideally i would like to create 2 or 3 "sets" that will serve all these sizes and not have to purchase 5~7 sets

a "set" would consist of a matching dovetail bit and relevant template straight bit o assume

Thank
Mike
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Following the success of my custom geared design CNC, I've been tinkering on my CNC general purpose design. My plan is to do a quick prototype and then start production in 2017. I have some exciting plans for this. Stay tuned. I've also made a set of templates to help with building quick spindle-based router sleds. I made them using jigsar's stock fence design. Here's a link to a video with a guide to making them: How to Make Router Sleds With a Box Jig. It uses jigsar's slider. Finally, for anyone who wants to spend a lot of time designing a custom CNC, check out SuperProParts. They have a dozen different CAD software choices. If you are a professional engineer and you are stuck on CAD software, look at it. You might actually get something done.
 
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