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I'm looking to up date my routers for table mounting. I have used an old B/D until it is worn right out, and have an old Craftsman 150 that the hight adjustment ring is less than satisfactory on.
I think that the ability to chuck 1/4 and 1/2 inch bits is a must but after that I don't know which features are important, and which are just window dressing. Variable speed?
I think that the Oak Park table top system is the best, most simple system for old timers like me!---Jack
 

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Hi Jack

The new routers on the market place now have many neat items, most of them don't have any window dressing so to speak about other than the paint job.

The soft start,VS,lights,both collets,quick lock,safety power switch,grounded power plugs,etc. but I will say one I have (router) that is a bit over board with the power switch thing with a dumb slide over cover for the power on button (Triton) ..

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Hello Jack,
Variable speed is a must with the larger routers to handle the big bits.
I do have to disagree with Bj about the safety slide lock on the Triton routers. It provides an important safety feature that will not allow you to change bits without the router power switch being in the off position.
 

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Hi george

I use a ext. power switch on the router table,,,and I have taped the clear plastic slider open all the way back,it's real pain...

I will agree it's a safety feature but it sucks.. :(

If I'm using for a plunge router I want to switch it on without playing with that little door...
And I always turn it off b/4 I change the bit :) :) :) it's hard to get the wrench on if it's turning. :)


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curiousgeorge said:
Hello Jack,
Variable speed is a must with the larger routers to handle the big bits.
I do have to disagree with Bj about the safety slide lock on the Triton routers. It provides an important safety feature that will not allow you to change bits without the router power switch being in the off position.
 

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Hi Guys,

I think you're both right in this case. BJ has taken precautions a different way. If a person doesn't do that then the switch cover is a great idea. What really is a pain is losing a digit because of carelessness. A little pain in the butt is much better than the pain experienced in a hospital getting a finger sewed back on or worse.

Ed......:)
 

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The official opinion of Bob and Rick is as simple as it is safe: Always unplug your router before making adjustments or changing bits.
 

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Hi George

Here's a snapshot or two how I have the Triton setup in the router table plus a shot of the clock that I'm going to put in a dust free case today....

The base plate is 1/2" x 11" x 11" and the Triiton router is mounted on a skew angle so it can just drop in the hole easy. (handles are bigger than the norm.)

It's a shop clock and needs to be in a box ( 1/8" plastic one in this case) with some 3/4" thick Cherry floor stock I have on hand,,, just two slots in the corner post to hold the plastic and a quick and easy base plate and top to do the same..

Just a note about power,,, I always pull the plug when changing bits a real old habit so the double safe plastic side is just a pain for me..

You will also see I use the sommerfeld wrench,it works better than the Triton ,it's has a deeper and sharper offset (90 deg.) ,to get right under the bigger bits...I also fits the Craftsman routers .... :)

Bosch/Makita/Triton2-1/4 Wrench/23.8mm 15/16"
http://www.sommerfeldtools.com/prodinfo.asp?number=WR003

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Just one more picture I forgot . :)
 

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Hi, Jack: The type of router, and the features are basically dependant on what you are going to do. If you are contemplating making raised panel doors, variable speed
and soft start are needed. Because the bits are large and must be run at a slower speed for safety reasons. I suggest that you go where you can handle some routers and get and idea of what you feel is comfortable for you. As one old timer to another
I agree that the Oak-Park table is the best, and not only for us older guys.
Hope this helps. Woodnut65
 

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Soft start, variable speed are definetly a must. The 1/4" & 1/2" collets are pretty much standard. I agree about the OP table, I've had mine for several yrs now and can't complain about it. :)
 
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