Router Forums banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have this router table which is almost identical to the Charnwood W014


It comes with two adhesive scales which are pictured in two different locations and could also actually be added to the top of each side of the fence. I assumed that they would be most useful for adjusting the fence so that it is square to the table edge but there is no recess in the table for them so it seems to be left up to the user. Perhaps they really aren't that useful as the cutter is circular and it's more important that the fence is straight and fixed? Maybe they would be more useful when using the mitre gauge or a coping sled?

Does anyone have any advice on where these would be most useful? I will mostly be routing rabbets, tenons, grooves etc and am unlikely to be doing much profiling / moulding. I also plan on jointing small boards with an offset outfeed fence
 

·
Official Greeter
Ross
Joined
·
9,705 Posts
Welcome to the forum.
 

·
Registered
Paul
Joined
·
1,975 Posts
They might be useful for setting stops along the fence??? I've often used stops. Of course you'd have to allow for the gap at the bit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,773 Posts
They look nice but really aren't necessary. As you point out the cutter is circular so no matter where the fence is it will cut the same the fence does not have to be straight. More important would be feather boards on the fence and table.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
20,217 Posts
Thinking it over, I think the scale is only useful if one end of the fence is fixed, so it becomes a fulcrum. Then you can place the scale into a slight mortise on the other end. It doesn't really matter what the markings are, because it is the face of the fence being even with the edge of the cutter that is what you want to note. Where that falls on your scale varies with the width of the cutter. With the left end of the fence fixed on a peg (for example), it is very easy to adjust the fence precisely again and again.

What makes this single scale valuable is That you can set it for multiple passes on the same piece. You start with shallow cut or cuts until you reach the final pass. Note that mark on the scale, and you can then repeat the cut on any number of pieces and they will all match. Precision setting the fence in that case really counts.

With something like milling picture frame material with a tall bit set, you can cut the pieces a little over length, then mill each piece, one at a time, yet get a good match. Repeatability is a big deal.

Attached is a picture of the Rockler table saw jig. It is similar to what I'm describing in that it is a fulcrum device, but with the arc marked in degrees. Once you set it to 90 degrees to the fence, the angles are precise and repeatable. That is the most useful thing about a fulcrum mounted fence.

Last item. How do you locate and make the fulcrum? You would want to mark the center of the underside of your fence, then use a drill press to drill, say, a quarter inch hole. Then drill a hole near the edge of your router table. Insert a 1/4 aluminum or steel peg and mount the fence on that peg. Voila, you now have a fulcrum-mounted fence. Use a straight edge and mortising bit to cut a very slight groove the exact width of your measuring scale (a steel ruler for example) so the scale is just slightly below level with the table top. If it's a printed scale, that will keep the fence from scraping the markings off. If it's engraved, you can make it perfectly level. I don't think it would matter much if it's parallel to the edge. Here's a possible choice: https://www.amazon.com/Officemate-C...626799953&sprefix=steel+ruler,aps,236&sr=8-24

Here's the table saw sled so you can picture this idea.
399030
 

·
Official Greeter
Joined
·
18,912 Posts
I had a similar generic table for some time and eventually sold it to another member in Queensland.

The scales are of no use, and you can waste a lot of time trying to get the scales to match.

As Tom showed, anchor one end and fine tune the other end to get the cut you desire.

Bob and Rick would use a hammer as a "fine adjusting tool". slight traps moved the fence in micro inches......LOL
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,992 Posts
if you look at the picture on that link you can see the scales fixed to each side of the table.
There is a use for them. They allow you to quickly align the fence square to the front T track so that you can use a sliding coping sled.
They also allow you to get a repeat depth of cut quickly if you have to change cutters and change back again.
Fit them as per the pictures.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
20,217 Posts
if you look at the picture on that link you can see the scales fixed to each side of the table.
There is a use for them. They allow you to quickly align the fence square to the front T track so that you can use a sliding coping sled.
They also allow you to get a repeat depth of cut quickly if you have to change cutters and change back again.
Fit them as per the pictures.
Excellent points Bob. I got rid of my coping sled. There are easier ways using simple square blocks of mdf. Less fiddling with bit height to get a profile match, assuming you are using matched door bit sets.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,992 Posts
Tom, old timers have found ways of doing everything easier or quicker, :p but newbies need all the help they can get.
The scales are there, the picture for positioning is there, madness not to fit them:cool:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,773 Posts
Excellent points Bob. I got rid of my coping sled. There are easier ways using simple square blocks of mdf. Less fiddling with bit height to get a profile match, assuming you are using matched door bit sets.
I cannot see any use for a coping sled. I tried it once and never again. Maybe I was doing something wrong but in order to use it, I had to raise the bit higher than usual which added another complication to an already delicate task. I simply use a miter gauge with a wood backer on the piece being coped to eliminate splinters. Just as with a table saw I don't use the fence when making cuts like this. I simply hold the wood tight so that it doesn't ride up to the bit or get pinched between the fence.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,992 Posts
Just raising the bit shouldnt add any complications. especially if the sled base is thin like a quarter inch, and only make thin cuts.

Your table saw method sounds very risky the way you have worded it. Dont take table saws for granted, they snatch and grab whenever they want to and amputate thousands of pieces of bodies every year.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,773 Posts
Just raising the bit shouldnt add any complications. especially if the sled base is thin like a quarter inch, and only make thin cuts.

Your table saw method sounds very risky the way you have worded it. Dont take table saws for granted, they snatch and grab whenever they want to and amputate thousands of pieces of bodies every year.
When making a rail and stile cut it has to be exact and not close. When you put another object under the piece being coped even a bit of sawdust can throw it off. When you have to duplicate the cut on another piece of wood if that piece of sawdust isn't there then your cut is off. As for the table saw fence what I am saying is that you never trap a piece of wood between the bench and the blade. If you were using the miter gauge to cut a piece of wood you would not also use the fence. To get the piece the exact same length you would use a stop block on the opposite end. When making the coping cut on the router the same applies.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top