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I have Bench Dog router table and had purchased the Oak Park 1/4 and 3/8 box joint jigs for it. Since more than likely if you are using other than an Oak Park table, you will have to set it up and drill holes in the top of your router table. It was suggested by another member that I photo this process for the benefit of others so here goes. It will take me a couple posts here to get all the photos loaded up. Note I am installing the 1/4 inch jig.

Here is a shot of my Bench Dog Router Table as it is:


Here I have installed the 1/4 inch router bit in the table I will be using. Since I don't want to use a good spiral bit cause I am testing this with mdf and some aspen I will use just a 2 flute straight 1/4 inch bit.


I now have the jig centered over the bit and I am going to use my router fence to help hold the jig in place here.


I now add the 1/4 Oak Park bar between the bit and the fence.


Happy with the position and everything looks good at this point so I add blocks and clamps around the router table to hold everything in place while I do my tests.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Ok, now it is time to do some test joints. Here is the material I will use to test with. 1/4 MDF and some 1/2 inch Aspen.


I take the aspen material and clamp it together and use the 1/4 bar to offset the front piece.


Ok after a few adjustments back in and out here are the test joints. I am happy with how these look. They are good and tight but not to tight you can assemble them. I didn't quite have the bit high enough in the 1/4 material as you can see.



Ok, it's time to drill the holes since I like the set up. I am using a 1/4 brad point bit. I remove my fence since it will interfere in the drilling. I add a couple more pieces and clamps to hold everything in place since I had to remove the fence.


The holes are drilled and the bolts are placed in the jig. It is fine except due to the router plate supports being real close here to the holes I have to use nuts instead of the wingnuts.


Photo showing the new holes drilled in the top without the jig on. Nice clean holes!


Here I have removed the 1/4 inch jig and installed the 3/8 jig in the same holes. I added a 3/8 straight bit and slid in a 3/8 set up bar and slides just in behind the jig just right! I didn't make any 3/8 inch test joints.


Well that's it! Hope this helps others.

Corey
 

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Very informative post, I think I'm going to stick this one. Thanks Corey!
 

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Corey,

Nice job buddy! This will help many others that want to do this same thing.

You have become a real asset to Routerforums and I knew you would be from day one :sold:
 

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Corey,

I was thinking of getting the set of 3 jigs... 1/4, 3/8, & 1/2 which looks like a pretty good deal (based on your experiences).

Do you think you could have installed the 1/4" jig by merely using a space bar, bit, & jig... marking the holes and drilling them? During your testing, did you have to modify the way the jig was positioned?
I guess that once you setup one jig, all three work with the same mounting holes? If so, really a good deal!! Setup one, get three! :) :) Yes?

Would a straight bit work OK with these jigs (a spiral working better, of course)?

I think you did a great job illustrating your How-to... Thank you for putting it together!
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
Joe Lyddon said:
Do you think you could have installed the 1/4" jig by merely using a space bar, bit, & jig... marking the holes and drilling them?
Joe, I quess you could try to do that but in my opinion you need to have every thing held down and you should drill it thru the holes in the jig as it is a very precise set of holes. If their was just one it wouldn't be a big deal but since you have 2 that must match then I wouldn't. I didn't have alot of hang over on mine for clamps and the jig was more in the middle of the table so I kind of had to capture it in its place.

Joe Lyddon said:
During your testing, did you have to modify the way the jig was positioned? I guess that once you setup one jig, all three work with the same mounting holes? If so, really a good deal!! Setup one, get three! :) :) Yes?
Joe, Yes I had to tweak it a bit. I had the bar wedged in to tight between the bit and the fence. I gave it a tiny bit of breathing room. Kind of hard to explain but it would slide out with a little help but not skate thru. Yes, all three jigs use the same holes for box joints anyway. The 3/8 and I think the 1/2 inch ( I dont' have the 1/2 inch) have an extra set of holes. These are used if you are going to do dove tails using the jigs. They can be drilled later when you are ready to do dove tails. I don't have intentions of using it for dovetails myself.

Joe Lyddon said:
Would a straight bit work OK with these jigs (a spiral working better, of course)?
I asked the same thing Joe. The answer to this became very apparent after Doing the testing. For testing yes, for doing nice work..no. I found that the straight bits tore out both materials pretty well. I asked Bobj if the spiral will cut down the majority of the tear out and I quote BobJ here:
"yes, because it's a spiral cut unlike the standard router bit and it's sharper also plus the top of the router bit is a true cutter all the way across the top of the bit, that's where the rip will start from the norm"
Combine this with a push block or a scrap backer and this should do it but I think straight fluted bits will be troublesome. I would hate to do have some of my expensive hardwood stock chewed up in the process.

You could also go with just a 1/4 in jig. Spirals 1/4 in bits aren't much more than a straight bit. When you get to 3/8 inch they get expensive and start heading for 35.00-50.00 a bit. I didn't get the 1/2 set up cause I am not going to spend what they want for one of those bits and for my boxes I wouldn't want a 1/2 box joint anyway so I didn't get it.

Joe Lyddon said:
I think you did a great job illustrating your How-to... Thank you for putting it together!
Thanks Joe, I appreciate it. Hope I answered your questions.

Corey
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I would add one thing here. Of course you should always be aware of where your hands are, but with this jig you are work directly over the bit with the bit exiting out the back. I would use a push block thicker than the heighth of the bit and put a knob on it. Much the same as a daddo and you don't want your hand near that bit when it exits!

Corey
 

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challagan said:
I would add one thing here. Of course you should always be aware of where your hands are, but with this jig you are work directly over the bit with the bit exiting out the back. I would use a push block thicker than the heighth of the bit and put a knob on it. Much the same as a daddo and you don't want your hand near that bit when it exits!

Corey
Corey,

Yes, I would always be using scrap Push blocks... maybe even a leading piece of scrap to keep tear out to a minimum.

A nice large Push block would also help keep them Vertical too :) .

Thanks again... Super job!
 

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Correct Joe. A large push block helps keep the pieces level, is much safer and reduces tear out. A piece of 4 x 4" that has been run over the bit so it works on the rail as a guide is the best push block. The wood has to be not just vertical for a good cut it has to pass the bit on a level plane.
 

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Mike,

Very good points...

Have you noticed that Bob (of Bob & Rick), when he uses the jig, cuts each board by itself rather than clamping a bunch together and cutting all of them at one time?

I remember being told that cutting more at a time was more accurate and would ensure that they fit together better... Is that true?
 

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Hi ACV
Can you take a snapshot of the "Miter Slot Adapter" in this case a picture is worth a 1000 words. :) and then edit your post to show the snapshot.

Bj :)
 

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Hi ACV

The pictures are great and I wish I could help with this jig BUT I not seen this type b/4 maybe one of the other menbers can help with this one. :)

Bj :)

But it's a great router table setup :)

JUST A NOTE***the 1st snapshot looks like a drop and lock Tee slot device.
That's to say it has/needs a Allen flat screw that holds the jig in place.
 

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ACV said:
I was considering attaching to a Miter Slot Adapter or one made out of Uhmw Polyethylene...and clamping the other side, as I really don't want to be drilling holes right now
I must confess, if that were my table I probably wouldn't want to drill it either
;)

A miter slot adapter and some clamps would work. The idea behind drilling the holes is to allow you to quickly drop the jig in the correct spot each time you use it. By attaching it via the miter slot you might have to tweak it a little each time you set it up but I see no problem with that.

Let us know how it works out.
Michael
 
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