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New to routing, quick question. I am currently using a Freud 1/4" shank, cove and bead bit with 1/8" radius on 3/4" hickory. I don't have a router table. What would be the process for making multiple passes to prevent splintering, or can you only do this with a router table by moving the fence? Thanks in advance.
 

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Sorry I can't help you but I'm sure the experts will chime in soon . But welcome to the forum
 

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Buff, you can lower your bit in 1/4" steps until you reach the full depth of cut. This is easy with the depth stop rod and turret on Bosch routers, a bit more difficult on some other brands.
 

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This is a bit with a bearing? Mike is right. Just keep lowering the bit for each pass until you get to the proper depth. A plunge router is best but a fixed base will work just fine. Make your last past take a tiny amount for a very clean cut. Use some sacrificial wood on the cross grain ends where chipout is a problem.

Any reason it has to be hickory? That's pretty hard.
 

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Thanks all, it is a bit with a bearing and the old craftsman I am using does have a height adjustment knob in 1/8" increments.
 

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Or use an edge guide and adjust the cut inwards on each pass.
I did two things;
-I just looked up the Craftsman edge guide...I was shocked at the p.o.s. that my search found.
Sears.com

Nothing like the old micro adjustable Craftsman edge guide that I have!
VTG Craftsman Edge Guide Contour Finger FOR Router SAW 25173 | eBay
-I checked out this old Router Forum reference...
http://www.routerforums.com/jigs-fixtures/30832-craftsman-bosch-router-guide.html
Seems like a lot of trouble to go to. With the bazillions of Craftsman routers out there, there must be a simpler edge guide (micro adjustable) solution?
 

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Since the bit has a bearing, it would be better to use a straight edge to run the bearing against rather than an edge guide. You could just move the edge guide in steps. I'd draw alignment lines if going that direction. I think depth would be easier to deal with.

If your crapsman router is anything like mine, the 1/8" increments are just lines on a scale. You should be able to get very small increments. I'd ignore the scale and measure how far the bit protrudes. My cman router scale is pretty much a joke.
 

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"...it would be better to use a straight edge to run the bearing against rather than an edge guide."
The bearing doesn't make contact until you reach the bit designed depth of cut ...perpendicular to the cut edge...when you use the accessory edge guide. Using the accessory you'd set the vertical ht. to its final position right from the beginning, moving only into the cut as controlled by the edge guide in increments.
But yes, moving a clamped straight edge would accomplish the same thing, basically a fence to run the router base against (Left to right...the router is right side up)
 

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New to routing, quick question. I am currently using a Freud 1/4" shank, cove and bead bit with 1/8" radius on 3/4" hickory. I don't have a router table. What would be the process for making multiple passes to prevent splintering, or can you only do this with a router table by moving the fence? Thanks in advance.
You didn't say how wide your board is. I agree with the others that a straight edge could be used to guide the router as the bearing rides against the edge.

Here is how I would go about doing this (see drawing).
Hope this helps.
Mike
 

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OK, now I'm lost. Isn't the OP talking about edge profiling?
I queried 'cove and bead' and the references I found immediately, with bearings, were all bottom bearings.
To complicate the matter in my mind, I cant relate this bit to the wood profile shown here...
Carbide-Tipped Cove and Bead Bits | Bosch Power Tools
Am I losing it or is that the wrong profile for the bit shown?
First you'll need to admit that yes...you're losing it. But it has nothing to do with bit and profile do not match...one is light, the other is dark... :)
 

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:help:


Light...dark... I thought we were talking about profiles, not beer.

I can see making that bit work, in two stages ...but the way it's shown?
 

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I use my router by hand.....not in a table. I'd run it in 2 or 3 passes to get to the finished pass. Remember, you can always take more off.....you can't always put more back on. And a light pass cut leaves a nice finish. Always start with an end grain first. That way you can generally clean up any small blow out with the side passes.

Post pics when you can.

Good luck!
 

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thanks everyone I finished the project with about 7 passes on each side. I think it turned out really well.
it did.....
 

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It all depends on the profile of the bead. If it is over a half round bead you have to do it in one pass, otherwise the bead will be wiped out when you lower your bit. Not sure what profile you are using. If it is a round over bit that has a radius that when lowered gives a bead, then multiple passes will work.

Herb

Guess I'm too late here, Forget what I said and ignore this post.
 

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It all depends on the profile of the bead. If it is over a half round bead you have to do it in one pass, otherwise the bead will be wiped out when you lower your bit. Not sure what profile you are using. If it is a round over bit that has a radius that when lowered gives a bead, then multiple passes will work.

Herb
some complex profiles need multiple passes but lowering the bit isn't advisable...
come in side ways by using different sized bearings and leave the depth setting alone...
 

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some complex profiles need multiple passes but lowering the bit isn't advisable...
come in side ways by using different sized bearings and leave the depth setting alone...
I agree with that, what I meant was that lowering the bit on a full bead like a table leg corner , and making a second cut will wipe out the bead.

Herb
 

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I agree with that, what I meant was that lowering the bit on a full bead like a table leg corner , and making a second cut will wipe out the bead.

Herb
correct...
 
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