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Discussion Starter #1
I based it on the jig that I am sure I saw from Bob and Rick (so thanks for the idea!!) and I added a backer board that slides along the spacer fence to keep everything square and aligned;
http://www.woodworkersweb.com/modules/gallery/albums/albuq98/Finger_joint_jig_1.jpg
http://www.woodworkersweb.com/modules/gallery/albums/albuq98/Fingerjoint_jig_2.jpg
http://www.woodworkersweb.com/modules/gallery/albums/albuq98/Finger_joint_end_result.jpg
The only thing is there is a bit of chip out on the back sides but I think that is because I am using an old cheap and throw away bit.

Apart from that I am really happy with the results!!
 

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So the rail acts as an indexing pin? Is the jig in the one picture on backwards, hiding a through-cut by the bit? Sorry, I am probably the only person who is missing this - but can you show a picture with one of the pieces you are making box joints on - in action on this sled?

Thanks! It's a great idea - and something (once someone dumbs it down for me), I'd like to try.
 

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Spacemanspiff said:
I based it on the jig that I am sure I saw from Bob and Rick (so thanks for the idea!!) and I added a backer board that slides along the spacer fence to keep everything square and aligned;
http://www.woodworkersweb.com/modules/gallery/albums/albuq98/Finger_joint_jig_1.jpg
http://www.woodworkersweb.com/modules/gallery/albums/albuq98/Fingerjoint_jig_2.jpg
http://www.woodworkersweb.com/modules/gallery/albums/albuq98/Finger_joint_end_result.jpg
The only thing is there is a bit of chip out on the back sides but I think that is because I am using an old cheap and throw away bit.

Apart from that I am really happy with the results!!
OK I'm confused as well. I see the runner and a slot in the backer board that slides but I don't see where the bit runs and how you index to the next cut? Could you go over the setup and use please.

Also if you add a scrap wood backer the chip outs will be on that instead of the workpiece.

Ed
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I'll try and take some more pics tomorrow, but the general idea is to have the work piece clamped vertically to the backer block (which slides along the indexing pin), have it hard up against the indexing pin (which does run the length of the jig), push the stock through the router bit, and then use the slot cut in the stock to index it for the next cut. Aaarrggghh!!! Maybe it is easier to use pictures - they are worth a thousand words afterall!! The router bit is 8mm, the gap between the bit and the indexing pin is 8mm and the indexing pin is 8mm as well, which (thankfully) means it all works.

More pics tomorrow folks.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
OK here we go then ... sorry to reproduce the pics but here we go;
The jig as it looks
http://www.woodworkersweb.com/modules/gallery/albums/albuq98/Finger_joint_jig_1.jpg
How the backer block slides along the indexing fence (backer block is also used as a zero clearance to help avoid chipout);
http://www.woodworkersweb.com/modules/gallery/albums/albuq98/Fingerjoint_jig_2.jpg
Here it is from the front with a piece clamped in it to show how it works. As I have ony dummied it up the piece I used was one of the original set-up test pieces so you can see the rest of the finger joints in it too;
http://www.woodworkersweb.com/modules/gallery/albums/albuq98/Finger_joint_cont_d.jpg
To use it all you do is butt the piece up to the fence and clamp it to the backer block. The space between the router bit and the fence is the exact same size as the router bit - as is the width of the indexing fence. Push the piece through the router bit (the handle keeps my fingers well away!!) and return it, undo the clamp, move the piece so the gap cut slots over the fence, clamp it up and repeat the step.
And this is how it turned out;
http://www.woodworkersweb.com/modules/gallery/albums/albuq98/Finger_joint_end_result.jpg
Not too bad if I do say so myself!!

Hope this is clearer now.

Thanks
Aaron
 

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OK now I see what's going on! Thanks for turning on the light for me.

Of course you must space two of the sides/fronts different to get the off-set for the joint but that is easy to do.

I like it, nice and simple and obviously does a good job. Thanks for sharing.

Ed
 

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Thanks Aaron. That third picture did it for me. I was confused because there was no through-hole in the fence. Also - your handle is in line with the router bit path -- but I can see that you simply stop once you hit the fence. Nice job and thanks for sharing the extra picture.
 

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I recognize it

Several yrs. ago I wanted something to catch the sawdust under my contracter saw. I made a box to fit in the frame using the same type of jig to make the joints, except I used a 1/4" bit.

DK
 

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When I bought my router table (Wolfcraft) a few years ago, the booklet showed 2 versions of the table.
The other had a bolt on bar on top of the table for finger jointing.
I phoned the company to see if the extra bits were availible and was told that they were unavailible in Europe because of safety issues.
Not to be put off, I made a bar and bolted it to the table and tried to make a finger joint following the instructions in the booklet.
I soon realised why they are considered dangerous.
The work snatched and got pulled out of my hand and flew across the workshop.
That convinced me to make a jig that would fit in a T slot in a table so it couldnt be thrown back at me.
 

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Dewy said:
When I bought my router table (Wolfcraft) a few years ago, the booklet showed 2 versions of the table.
The other had a bolt on bar on top of the table for finger jointing.
I phoned the company to see if the extra bits were availible and was told that they were unavailible in Europe because of safety issues.
Not to be put off, I made a bar and bolted it to the table and tried to make a finger joint following the instructions in the booklet.
I soon realised why they are considered dangerous.
The work snatched and got pulled out of my hand and flew across the workshop.
That convinced me to make a jig that would fit in a T slot in a table so it couldnt be thrown back at me.
Since I never like wood being thrown at me could you add a few more details as to what you made and how it should have worked but didn't so I don't try something like that?

Ed
 

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Sure Ed
The addition to the table was just a 1/4" aluminium bar exactly as shown in the book.
The table came with the holes already made to accept small screws to hold it in place.
The instructions for finger jointing had nothing about a jig but to hold one piece upright and slide it over the cutter offset by the thickness of the bar and cutter and the next cut with both pieces clamped together so one overhung the bar and the other against it.
I have since made a jig similar to the ones show that uses the mitre slot.

It was the near accident following the instruction that came with the table that decided me to make a jig for it.
It's a great improvement as I can keep the jig pressed firmly down as it slides with my hands well away from the cutter.
There are far too many 8 and 9 fingered chippies out there to take any chances.
It only takes one accident with any power tool to cause great damage or loss and I have no intention of maring my looks which still turn the ladies heads at almost 60. hehe
 
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