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I'm jealous...
great find...
 

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Discussion Starter #3
the front wooden plane and the tiny metal one were my dads. he died 39 years ago. I've only just got them from my sister, who has had them all those years. I didnt even know she had them.
theres a huge vertical split in the front of the wooden one, so no resale value, even if it is a good named tool, but huge sentimemtal value.
 

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The smallest one, in the front? the one with the metal band?
Just a random thought here, but is it possible to remove everything, saw the plane vertically...front to back, and insert a contrasting slice of hardwood? Epoxy I'm thinking.
Then rework as necessary. Perhaps no longer an antique, but back to being a functioning plane?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The brass banded one is the one that was my dads. He was a "careful" man with tools, never knew him to buy new. He was a structural ironworker by trade, and a cabinet maker by hobby. I dont have a hope in hell of reaching ANY of his standards.

The band is very strong, and its actually a functioning plane with a good steel, although I'm not sure why the top edge of the steel is so beaten over?

I suspect I shall just skim the bottom and leave it as is. I have no intention of resale on any of them, just need to learn how to use them.
Its stamped GREENSLADES BRISTOL and the steel is MARPLES HIBERNIA.
The tiny metal plane was also my dads, I have no info on this other than the numbers 101 cast into the metal.
Any ideas?
 

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You might find some useful information on Lee Valley`s website. You could also look for a copy of Garrett Hack`s book on hand planes. Some say it is one of the best resources available on hand planes.
 

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The 101 is an old Stanley tools trim plane... nice lil fella :) very lightweight in use, but what it lacks in size it makes up for in use..

Greenslades Bristol was a plane maker across the pond up until around 1937/38. Not uncommon or exceptionally noteworthy, but a solid tool
worthy of some attention.

MARPLES HIBERNIA:
William Marples and Sons - Hibernia Works - Sheffield, UK
William Marples and Sons
Marples brand is generally considered good stuff!!!

Your off to a great start!!!!
 

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The brass banded one is the one that was my dads. He was a "careful" man with tools, never knew him to buy new. He was a structural ironworker by trade, and a cabinet maker by hobby. I dont have a hope in hell of reaching ANY of his standards.

The band is very strong, and its actually a functioning plane with a good steel, although I'm not sure why the top edge of the steel is so beaten over?

I suspect I shall just skim the bottom and leave it as is. I have no intention of resale on any of them, just need to learn how to use them.
Its stamped GREENSLADES BRISTOL and the steel is MARPLES HIBERNIA.
The tiny metal plane was also my dads, I have no info on this other than the numbers 101 cast into the metal.
Any ideas?
Some folks were known to use the plane irons as chisels - likely struck with a hammer.

Since they were your dad's planes, I wouldn't think about resale - I'd use them, then pass them on to an offspring if you have any, or another family member. Some things should be kept in the family - for sentimental reasons.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I'm not big on buying reference books for just looking at one or two pics. (g) I'll wait till it goes to video.

For some subconcious reason I keep referring to that 101 metal plane as a BUTTON plane. Is that a correct name? Good to know its a stanley.
I can see my dad multi tasking using the plane iron as a large chisel. That solves a mystery for me.

One of the other planes is stamped ADKINS, time to go look that one up.
 

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Bob, It is obvious your father had a passion for his plane. He used it (a lot) and loved it enough to repair the split in order to continue using it. adhesives were not as good years ago so the strap kept it from widening the split. One thing that could be done is to use a 2 part slow setting epoxy (from West Marine). It is thin enough to suck with a vacuum deep into the split to bond it. At 70* f it cures in about 24 hours so while the vacuum is being used you can add more epoxy until the split is completely filled. The epoxy won't stick to ordinary packaging tape so you can tape over any cracks to direct the flow of suction and prevent the epoxy from flowing out while it is setting. It can also be dyed. I think if it was my fathers plane he would have wanted someone to continue using it. Old wooden planes were maintained using boiled linseed/turpentine/bees wax to help prevent checking, and bees wax was rubbed on the bottoms to prevent friction when used. Learning to tune up an old wooden plane is not that hard to do and you will be amazed at how well they work. I started out with an old antique jack plane which got me interested and from there progressed into making planes that work quite well just for fun. The other benefit of using a hand plane is no irritating air born dust, and you will not be distracted by noisy machinery. Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I have lots of work to do on them.
the second biggest arrived on a pure fluke.
I happened to be near to an old friends workshop for the first time in a few years and dropped in. His business is building wooden equipment for local government (office and school) use.

I happened to mention I had acquired the small wooden planes. he walked over to a drawer and bought out the 17" plane.
He said "I put this in the drawer 30 years ago, havent taken it out since, you can have it"

Having suddenly amassed all these planes, i just had to go buy a JET sharpening system. Something else I have to get to grips with now (g)
 

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Bob,

Your dad may have intentionally bent the top of the plane iron over to make it easier to adjust. If you don't know, the irons are adjusted with a hammer. To lower the blade you tap the iron, to back the iron back out, you tap the heel of the plane body with the hammer. Notice I, said, TAP not hit.

Before you go flattening the soles make sure that the throats are not too wide already. If you remove wood it will open them up. Remember, you want to keep the opening as tight as practical. Make sure that they are square with parallel sides and ends.

If the throats are too wide you can "sister" a piece of Beech or similar wood to the sole and narrow up the throat.
 

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I have a lot to do and a lot to learn, but I am hostage to two grandchildren (5 and 3) for the next two weeks untill they go back to school. Tried working in the garage with them....
oh no oh no oh no, WRONG!

5 weeks now without my workshop, I hate school holidays.
Send them around to Mike's......

He will send them back as wood workers....
 

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Bob,

Before you go flattening the soles make sure that the throats are not too wide already. If you remove wood it will open them up. Remember, you want to keep the opening as tight as practical. Make sure that they are square with parallel sides and ends.

If the throats are too wide you can "sister" a piece of Beech or similar wood to the sole and narrow up the throat.
you can sister a piece to the frog to ''fix'' the depth of the throat...
 
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What a find. My did was a master gardener and landscaper. I keep an old curved tree saw of his as a reminder. Great you got his old tools. The grandson's curiosity is a good sign. Find an old wind up clock for him to take apart, or get some cheap stuff at a thrift store and help him take things apart in an orderly way, then let him help you put some of the stuff back together. Get a 12 oz hammer and small nails and cut some soft pine into strips, pre cut for bird houses. Water based, washable paint for the little girl to do some decoration on those houses. A napkin holder would be another option--make one for mom and another for grandma. Move him from breaking stuff down into putting things together. Let him mark where to cut things, then you cut them for him. Get a project ready for glue up and let the boy do and undo the dry fit. It will instill concepts that will get him interested and may serve to interest him in things like engineering. How about pre cutting a simple wooden airplane (gotta be a jet these days) with dowels to attach wings, tail, and wheels. Don't glue it together until he has had all his fun setting up and breaking down the airplane. Paint his name on the side (pre paint a white base coat, then apply stick on letters, paint the plane a neat color, and remove the sticky letters).

Get coloring books for the girl, new studies show that coloring in books is developmentally a great thing--develops fine motor and visual motor control. Put a little table and chair in a corner of the shop so she can stay occupied playing there while you're working with the boy.

Kids learn a lot from projects like these, including developing the ability to visualize and direct their attention and concentration. I bet there are a hundred simple toys and things you two could make and the girl could decorate. The concepts such as grooves and tongues, how airplanes go together, will last a lifetime and help in many careers. And then there's the matter of always remembering the fun of working with grandpa in the shop. Have you noticed how many of us have fond early memories about people we admired who first introduced us to woodworking in our youth?
 

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Discussion Starter #18
The boy isnt quite ready to learn yet, he's only 5 and 1 month, and at the moment has the attention span of a goldfish on speed. hopefully next year will be a good year for us in the workshop.

We have looked after them for 6 weeks now. They go back home in 8 days, then I can get back to my workshop.
 

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Dan
Great suggestion - and those log sets really bring back memories. Got one around the same time as I got my twin cowboy holster set
 
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