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My name is Deborah. For my third birthday, our neighbor Chickie gave me a hammer, pliers, and screwdriver. She had my number. They were the best presents ever. Throughout my kidhood, I fixed things. Whatever was broken. I built stuff. I made things. My parents (a chemist and an engineer) nurtured my interests. By fifth grade I wanted to be a doctor. I became a physician (internal medicine and intensive care) and a medical ethicist. I am grateful for 30 years of the privilege of waking up each day with the opportunity to make a difference in peoples lives, the challenge to solve a mystery, develop a creative solution, or sometimes just to be present and caring, to consider my patients' well-being above all else. I was diagnosed with Parkinson's disease, and that ended my ability to continue practicing medicine. In addition to an intensive exercise program, fistfuls of medication, and compensating each day with the challenges of the disease, I've returned to making, building, fixing, and solving problems where lives are not at stake. I built a wooden oar rack and then boat racks on a steep hillside for my rowing club. I switched to galvanized steel (all bolted construction- I don't know how to weld. Then an aluminum and foam pontoon rig for my single scull racing shell. Each new step of each new project reveals whole universes of what I don't know. When lucky, I learn from patient masters. Most of the time, from books and YouTube. I gave my skill saw to my yard guy- not safe with my Parkinsions. I have a broad array of hand tools including a gorgeous set of chisels, and have accumulated Milwaukee 18 tools including VS drill, impact driver, impact wrench, rotary tool, Die Grinder, planer, random orbital sander, Hackzall reciprocating saw, jig saw, dual bevel sliding compound miter saw, and a table saw. I also have a 14" dry cut metal chop saw. My newest acquisitions are a 1940s Buffalo Forge 15 drill press (and a new Ryobi 12 drill press). Over a year ago, I bought a Milwaukee M18 compact router with additional plunge and offset bases, a bench top router table, and some bits. I am quite embarrassed to say that the Router table have been sitting, still boxed, waiting for me to have time to learn how to use them properly and safely. I am thrilled today to have found this wonderful forum, and have downloaded all the high quality reference material posted here, and the next project is setting up the router and table.

But I first have I have a burning question: When I bought the Kreg router table, I researched it thoroughly. But today I noted on Amazon questions about the table some answers that indicate it is not compatible with my router. I vaguely remember reading that a year ago, but finding other information that superseded it. Does anyone know if the Milwaukee M18 Fuel Compact Router 2723-20 is compatible with the Kreg PRS2100 Bench Top Router Table ? Is it a matter of getting a proper insert? Or is there some incompatibility with no easy fix ? With my ignorance about routers, I'm reluctant to start putting things together until I know the components will work together well.

Thank you!!
 

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Hey Doc! welcome to the forum. I retired In 2018 after 30 years of making a difference in people’s lives as a paramedic. I thank you for your service to your patients! Regarding your Kreg router table, I suggest you give Kreg a call. They are here in Iowa and I hear their customer service is amazing. I send my pocket hole jig drill bits to them to be sharpened and I always get a note in the box upon return. Their phone number is 8004478638. Their email address is [email protected]. Once again welcome!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hey Doc! welcome to the forum. I retired In 2018 after 30 years of making a difference in people’s lives as a paramedic. I thank you for your service to your patients! Regarding your Kreg router table, I suggest you give Kreg a call. They are here in Iowa and I hear their customer service is amazing. I send my pocket hole jig drill bits to them to be sharpened and I always get a note in the box upon return. Their phone number is 8004478638. Their email address is [email protected]. Once again welcome!
Hey Doc! welcome to the forum. I retired In 2018 after 30 years of making a difference in people’s lives as a paramedic. I thank you for your service to your patients! Regarding your Kreg router table, I suggest you give Kreg a call. They are here in Iowa and I hear their customer service is amazing. I send my pocket hole jig drill bits to them to be sharpened and I always get a note in the box upon return. Their phone number is 8004478638. Their email address is [email protected]. Once again welcome!
Thanks so much, Jake. That's a good idea. The more I think about it, there may be other issues- like cut-off switches- mounting a battery-run tool under a table...that I will also ask about. A mounted tool is generally a much safer option for me!

I am amazed and appreciate the rapid response on
Hi Deborah - glad you're here and welcome! Just an FYI - If you can edit this to add several paragraphs you'll probably get a lot more folks to read it.
this site- but than that was your specialty, too!
 

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G'day Deborah. Welcome to the forum.
 
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Welcome aboard Deborah. As you already know this is a hobby that requires research and careful patience which I'm sure you have an abundance of. This indeed can be a very rewarding hobby and fortunately there are multiple ways to accomplish the needed task many ways.

When I built my router table my concerns were safety kill switch, easily accessible speed control, a large stable work surface, high quality fence and above all the ability to use safety devices. The fence I have allows easy use of both feather boards and Jess Em Clear-Cut™ Stock Guides. I also use their router motor and variable speed switch which I'm not sure is available any longer.

Automotive design Luggage and bags Wood Automotive exterior Gas
Electronic engineering Electrical wiring Gadget Gas Cable
Automotive design Luggage and bags Wood Automotive exterior Gas
Electronic engineering Electrical wiring Gadget Gas Cable
 

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Welcome, Deborah. Having your disease and ability, I'm surprised you haven't gone into a cnc routing.
With your capabilities, you could easily construct one.
Just my thoughts on reading your interesting post.
Stevenrf:unsure:
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Welcome aboard Deborah. As you already know this is a hobby that requires research and careful patience which I'm sure you have an abundance of. This indeed can be a very rewarding hobby and fortunately there are multiple ways to accomplish the needed task many ways.

When I built my router table my concerns were safety kill switch, easily accessible speed control, a large stable work surface, high quality fence and above all the ability to use safety devices. The fence I have allows easy use of both feather boards and Jess Em Clear-Cut™ Stock Guides. I also use their router motor and variable speed switch which I'm not sure is available any longer.

View attachment 399695 View attachment 399696 View attachment 399695 View attachment 399696
SReilly, thank you. Kill switch is top of my list. Thanks for information, advice, and for steering me toward JessEm! I also just discovered Infinity.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Welcome, Deborah. Having your disease and ability, I'm surprised you haven't gone into a cnc routing.
With your capabilities, you could easily construct one.
Just my thoughts on reading your interesting post.
Stevenrf:unsure:
Stevenrf, laughing! I've already displaced my car from the garage. Building a workshop to house more, at my Parkinson's pace, would be a lifetime project!
 

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Welcome Deborah, I think you will like it here.

I was a fireman and EMT II on a rescue squad and 3 credit hours from becoming a paramedic before becoming a fire marshal for a 3.8 million sq ft 1,380 acre manufacturing facility here in Charlotte, NC. Then I became far too busy to continue with my medical training, so never finished..

I too started woodworking very early in life, with a toolbox full of hand tools given to me by my grandfather. I was 8 when one of my uncles began teaching me how to use power tools safely, and I paid attention, so I still have all ten.

Calling Kreg will likely get you all the help that you need, but if you need more, one or more of us will respond quickly to whatever question you may have. In fact, sometimes we tend to burry those who ask questions with all of the help that we some times provide.

A few attached cell phone pics usually helps a great deal when the words needed to form the questions aren't all that clear.

Charley
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
So, I finally have come to understand the problem of compatibility between a compact cordless router and a router table.
It has little to do with size/mounting--as the Milwaukee is a bit bigger than some others, and I could likely custom drill a mounting plate. Further, Rockler, Veritas (Veritas Tools - Router Tables and Accessories - Table for Compact Routers) and others are coming out with tables designed for compact/trim routers. It is a fundamental problem with the function of a cordless compact router and a table. I completely missed it after watching videos of using the hand-held router and other videos about using table-mounted routers. (slapping my forehead)The deal-breaker is that access to the on/off switch would be obstructed, at best, and no means for attaching a kill switch.
 

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Deborah, I have a feeling that your drive and persistence will quickly overcome your inexperience with routers. If you Google 'Kreg router table insert plates', you'll see that Kreg has these plates and that they are predrilled for Porter Cable and Bosch Routers. The posting by a Desert Rat Tom today in regard to the person with the Kobalt router table has a diagram with the mounting pattern for a number of different routers. If you do a Google search, the Kreg page also has some links to YouTube videos about drilling router insert plates for different routers. One of the video is by Kreg --
-- You can also use the base plate for your router as a template for drilling the mounting holes in a Kreg insert plate. In fact, as time goes along, you may want to get a little more powerful router and attach it to one router insert plate while having your Milwaukee Router mounted to a separate insert plate. Much easier to switch out routers that way. You may also want to get a separate power switch such as the Powertec 71054 magnetic paddle switch if the table kit you have did not come with a power switch. Having a conveniently mounted switch can be a lot easier to deal with than fiddling around trying to access the switch on the tool when it's under the table. The benefit of the magnetic switch is that if the power goes off for some reason, the switch turns off. This avoids a surprise when the power comes back on and the router springs to life without any advance warning. You also might want to consider a Kreg Router lift system, especially if you do get a bigger router and want to set certain measurements without having to remove the router from the table. Some routers come with this feature. You'll find lots of interesting information on this site, and tips on how to use your equipment -- and help on how to spend your money.
 

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But be careful. Routers breed almost like rabbets. Once you have two, the numbers keep climbing. I have 14 at last count, and each has a personality and capabilities that the others don't, so I keep them around and use the one best suited for the task at hand.

Charley
 

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Hi Deborah, I really enjoyed you dissertation. I spent a decade in newsrooms, so I like to break things into paragraphs to make them easier to read. I've spent the last 40 years consulting and training docs and staff in the vision care field, pediatric for the most part. Loved every minute, but lost my voice. So I write a lot. In fact, attached is a long piece on the 18 things that sped up my learning curve on woodworking.

Like you I've done repairs, home improvement, built things pretty much since childhood. One thing that's in the attached pdf is info about sawdust collection. With health considerations, you don't want to get that sawdust into your lungs. I tried several ways to do this, but wound up with a very standard setup. Harbor Freight Dust collection unit(s), each has a Super Dust Deputy cyclone attached. The cloth bag the HF comes with was replaced by Wynn 1micron filter cans, and the cyclones are mounted on 30 gallon fiber drums with steel tops. The cyclone spins the sawdust so most of it drops down into the chip collector, the HF unit spins it agains so almost all the sawdust falls into a plastic bag and that keeps it out of the drum filter.

I have two setups because my shop is divided between my garage and a converted 12x24 shed out back.

After reading all about OSHA studies on dust in home shops, I created an enclosed space outside my shop where the units sit. There's another 20x20 filter that lets the air go back into the shop. I live in the desert, hot in summer, freezing in winter. The air return retains warm or AC air to the shop. I wish I'd done it long ago because I think years of inhaling sawdust might be part of my lung issues now.

Here's a picture of the dust collection compartment just outside my shop. When you have your shop built, consider having something similar set up. You can't be messing with your health.
Pipeline transport Plumbing Gas Cylinder Machine


As to a router, I have four, two Bosch 1617s, with both bases, a small trim router (Bosch) and for the table I choose the Triton TRA001, which makes it easy to adjust from the top. It also has some safety feathres so you can't run it while changing bits. It is 3.25hp but too heavy for me to use freehand. I rarely use the 1617s anymore and prefer to do routing on the table. MUCH safer and more precise.

Also attached is a pdf of the 18+ things that helped me learn, and it also may help you avoid making costly mistakes. I have a lot of gear because I bought it during my peak earning years. It's long, but has pictures. Enjoy. BTW, you can ask any kind of question you want. As you can tell, we love responding.
 

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Hello Deborah,
Welcome to the Forum.
My router table is a bare bones DIY thing so no input on that front.
I would like to say that you have had a very impressive and fulfilling life. But, what is most impressive and admirable is your attitude toward your health situation.
 

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My name is Deborah. For my third birthday, our neighbor Chickie gave me a hammer, pliers, and screwdriver. She had my number. They were the best presents ever. Throughout my kidhood, I fixed things. Whatever was broken. I built stuff. I made things. My parents (a chemist and an engineer) nurtured my interests. By fifth grade I wanted to be a doctor. I became a physician (internal medicine and intensive care) and a medical ethicist. I am grateful for 30 years of the privilege of waking up each day with the opportunity to make a difference in peoples lives, the challenge to solve a mystery, develop a creative solution, or sometimes just to be present and caring, to consider my patients' well-being above all else. I was diagnosed with Parkinson's disease, and that ended my ability to continue practicing medicine. In addition to an intensive exercise program, fistfuls of medication, and compensating each day with the challenges of the disease, I've returned to making, building, fixing, and solving problems where lives are not at stake. I built a wooden oar rack and then boat racks on a steep hillside for my rowing club. I switched to galvanized steel (all bolted construction- I don't know how to weld. Then an aluminum and foam pontoon rig for my single scull racing shell. Each new step of each new project reveals whole universes of what I don't know. When lucky, I learn from patient masters. Most of the time, from books and YouTube. I gave my skill saw to my yard guy- not safe with my Parkinsions. I have a broad array of hand tools including a gorgeous set of chisels, and have accumulated Milwaukee 18 tools including VS drill, impact driver, impact wrench, rotary tool, Die Grinder, planer, random orbital sander, Hackzall reciprocating saw, jig saw, dual bevel sliding compound miter saw, and a table saw. I also have a 14" dry cut metal chop saw. My newest acquisitions are a 1940s Buffalo Forge 15 drill press (and a new Ryobi 12 drill press). Over a year ago, I bought a Milwaukee M18 compact router with additional plunge and offset bases, a bench top router table, and some bits. I am quite embarrassed to say that the Router table have been sitting, still boxed, waiting for me to have time to learn how to use them properly and safely. I am thrilled today to have found this wonderful forum, and have downloaded all the high quality reference material posted here, and the next project is setting up the router and table.

But I first have I have a burning question: When I bought the Kreg router table, I researched it thoroughly. But today I noted on Amazon questions about the table some answers that indicate it is not compatible with my router. I vaguely remember reading that a year ago, but finding other information that superseded it. Does anyone know if the Milwaukee M18 Fuel Compact Router 2723-20 is compatible with the Kreg PRS2100 Bench Top Router Table ? Is it a matter of getting a proper insert? Or is there some incompatibility with no easy fix ? With my ignorance about routers, I'm reluctant to start putting things together until I know the components will work together well.

Thank you!!
Welcome, Doc! What a heartwarming story. I recently retired also and I'm reluctant to admit I'm getting forgetful and less agile around power tools. I sold my Unisaw to get a SawStop because I can't afford to lose any more digits. Just a thought I acted on....
 
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