Router Forums banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,864 Posts
Hope you're going for 2x6 studs so you can put in some heavy duty insulation. Double or triple pane windows, and heavy insulation under the roof. One other thing that has worked really well for me in putting a layer of radiant barrier between roof and insulation. It cut a measured 35 degrees of heat passed through roof. R38 underneath and in the walls and you'll be snug hot or cold, and save money on heating and cooling. I love it. Hope you'll keep us up to date.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,864 Posts
French drains. Rock in trenches, or even perforated 4 inch PVC laid on top of the rocks, will catch and carry away water permanently. Raise the foundation so you have a downhill slope all around to carry rain water away from the base of the structure. If the structure runs across an underground water line, I'd consider a different location or rerouting the line. Having struggled with irrigation for nearly two decades here in the desert, almost all of my main irrigation lines are now schedule 80 PVC, very long life, not easily broken or breached. More expensive, but fewer problems.

My property is higher on both ends and shallow in the middle by 3 feet. My outside irrigation leads to open sprinklers and dribblers in the low areas, so when I cut off the water, the pipes all drain so even with a deep freeze,the buried pipes have nothing to freeze and burst the pipe.

Mentioning all this because for the wet spot to recur, suggests that a drain will be necessary. I'd also make sure you have rain gutters that carry the water away from the building. We have a complication of having a layer of concrete-like caliche, which doesn't let water soak down. Had to dig 2-4 feet down to enable planting and drainage.

I futzed around with schedule 40 for years because it was cheaper. It was always bursting, leaking, giving me fits and costly repairs. Schedule 80 is almost three times the price, but careful design, trenching and the self draining via gravity, has made it trouble free. I have risers here and there that feed short drip tubing, but also reveal the location of every pipe. A 1 day water leak here jumps the water bill by $300-$500. That has not happened since putting in the schedule 80.

.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,864 Posts
Wow, haven't checked this string for awhile. That gravel looks like it runs slightly downhill from the slab. That's good. I stopped using pea gravel and now use crushed rock of similar size because it pack down when you drive over it. Pea gravel moves instead. My whole front yard is crushed rock, a mix of dark and lighter color stones.

I noticed the slab is slightly elevated. Good choice. Our back yard is "hollowed out" because they bulldozed it forward to elevate our slab to just a little higher than street level. When we installed my 10x12 office shed, I dug five four foot by 18 inch holes and filled them with crushed stone. This gives it drainage. I pay attention to this because the first year we moved here, we had record rainfall during the winter and I got to see how water tears things up. It's been drought the last few years, but I know to take preventive measures.

Good point about the 6 inch to accommodate the downspouts. Thanks, I have to do something about our washer's output. Don't want it going into the septic tank. It will be a big deal to dig a new deep tank. I've had thoughts about building a mother in law apartment in the back acre, but I'd likely have to have a separate system out there. I'd have to import dirt for a mound, or have a concrete foundation built up to make it safe from potential flooding. I'd have to get permission from my neighbor to pull the fence down for deliveries, equipment and concrete.

I'm enjoying your posts and seeing how things are coming along.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,864 Posts
Holy cow! All those logs are going to keep you busy. Can't recall exactly where I saw it, but someone build a drying lean to that could be heated and dry the wood much faster. You might also contact a Tree removal/trimming company to bid on logs when these are gone. Bet you could sell some of that nifty roughcut wood without much problem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,864 Posts
I need a retaining wall on the left side by the neighbors’s as there’s a pretty big slope. I spent a couple of weeks moving and taking dirt trying to make a decent terrace until finally I decided I wouldn’t be happy with it. I’ll get it this year.
I have a similar situation. An old wood fence held back the difference in levels, but the wind out here kept blowing more and more sand there, so the level kept increasing. Happily, my neighbor, who happens to be a federal agent, decided to put in a block wall fence. That crew dug it out, rolled the decorative rock away, put the blocks in, then rolled back the dirt and then the stones on my side. I'm glad he did it, the old wood fence was about done for.

Interesting guy, but his fence has spikes on top so it looks a lot like a prison. I suspect security is an issue for an agent. Not every person he arrests is a friendly sort.

As to the garage, in my household, an unclaimed space devolves to my wife. Don't forget to put in radiant barrier.

Glad to hear you're doing well.

Tom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,864 Posts
Wow! That looks awesome!

I know about the money thing. I keep telling uncle Bill ... You know ... Bill Gates ... I say, "Uncle Bill! We've been through SO MUCH together! Windows 95 ... 98 ... 98XP ... 7 ... 2000 ... NT ... Vista ... ME ... and now 10! ... Can't you toss me just ONE MILLION DOLLARS?!" He never replies. 😖

Joe
I'm not very friendly toward uncle Bill. Win 11 is on the way. Every version involves relocating commands and moving them down another click or two. My rocket scientist brother also taught computer science for years, and he holds uncle Bill (and Sam) in even lower regard.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,864 Posts
Man, that's coming along nicely. Curious, how will you insulate it? Spray on foam, inside framing and rolled insulation? I have room in my back yard for something like that. Would have to get neighbor's permission to bring a concrete truck close enough to put in the slab.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,864 Posts
Having real power is wonderful. I have a 12x24 shed about 50 feet from the back door and had to string a 100 foot extension to use it Then my wife surprised me by having an electrician run underground, three 20 amp circuits. I color coded each with color tape al the way through so I don't accidentally overload any one circuit. Are you going to hang some of those new 48 inch LED lights in there?

Good idea on putting a frame and covering with plywood. On one wall of my shed, I put up 1/4 inch pegboard instead, and it has proven very handy. You may be familiar with those adjustable shelves that have wire shelving? Consider putting up some 6 footers, starting about 16 inches from the floor. I love using them and have many smaller items in matching plastic boxes with closed tops. Keeps the sawdust out. By keeping your bottom shelves high off the floor, cleaning up is much easier. I also use those adjustable brackets to hold wood and other long items.

Last thing, I insulated my steel garage door, I started with a layer of aluminum foil bubble type Radiant Barrier. against the steel. This thing reflects IR heat away. I have it in my garage and both my office and woodworking shed. Really helps in the ceiling and walls, especially the workshop wall that gets maximum sun exposure. R13 isn't quite enough for desert heat or cold. I'd definitely put it in above the 2x framing. That will be a heat pump--in during summer, out in the winter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,864 Posts
Dang, that is really nice. Are you adding more insulation? R10 isn't much if it gets really hot or cold. Bet it fills in faster that you think it will. One detail I almost didn't do in my shop was color code the circuits. I have three 20 amp circuits, blue, orange and green. Makes it easy to avoid overloading any one circuit. The blue services the lights and the AC or heater. LED lighting doesn't use much current, so I can run small tools on that circuit. I used color electrical tape attached to each set of wires as I pulled them through. Heavy duty recepticals too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,864 Posts
That looks really great. Your wiring looks very clean and orderly. Beautiful shop. Let us know how the inspection goes.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top