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That is a great solution. Zero clearance too. I think you might want to run the first edge through a jointer to get a truly straight edge on it. Most common wood is going to have some small irregularities you'd want to get rid of. The thickness of a folded sheet of paper is all the wiggle room you have for side to side movement, and a small warp on the straight edge would bind the saw.

I think you'd want one of these to be at least 6 feet long, maybe aeven, depending on the position of the blade and bottom of the saw.

With a battery operated saw, this would be something you might want on a job site, not just in the shop. Drill a hole on one end so you can hang it up for storage. You might also want to lay two long pieces of low friction tape for the saw to slide along smoothly. Given my memory, I'd also print a reminder on it to keep the good face down to reduce tear out. The blade you set it up with shold also be labeled for that use. You wouldn't want a mis-fit that would destroy the zero clearance quality.

One thing about a track saw is the ability to lower the blade safely and accurately into the wood. I suppose you could do that with this jig, but it would really be easy to mess it up as you pushed the blade down, or used the blade depth settings on the saw. The track saw uses a depth stop so you can avoid accidentally cutting too deep. I keep a big sheet of flat foam insulation around for track saw use.
 

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KISS...can't ask for better...

Thanks for posting...you hit it on the head "for us cheap guys"
 
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Theo
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KISS...can't ask for better...

Thanks for posting...you hit it on the head "for us cheap guys"
Definitely, the holes are a great idea.

You may be cheap, but I'm not, I am financially challenged.
 

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This certainly is a cost effective method but I'm wondering how good the cut edge would be. I guess that really depends on the quality and condition of the blade or is this not a concern and just rough sizing to make final cuts on the table saw? BTW, my wife says there's nothing cheap about me when it comes to tools.....
 

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Theo
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This certainly is a cost effective method but I'm wondering how good the cut edge would be. I guess that really depends on the quality and condition of the blade or is this not a concern and just rough sizing to make final cuts on the table saw? BTW, my wife says there's nothing cheap about me when it comes to tools.....
I don't know about everyone else, but I don't need a 100% dead on cut, just close. Right now at least, I want everything I cut just a shade oversize, because it will be used with a master and routed to exact size. This would be easier for me to use, and plenty accurate, over anything I've seen, or come up with. So this design is what I'm going for. Not going the one size fits all route tho, going to make at least two lengths, possibly three. A hole on the end will allow hanging on the wall, out of the way. I love K.I.S.S. And, if you wanted to get fancy, I'll bet you could make versions that would cut angles. Now just waiting to see if Woodpecker will come up with a $300 version.
 
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Paul
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This is going on my project list.

Considering Tom's concerns: I wonder if something could be made to add a depth-stop to a circular saw. Maybe a screw and wingnut in the curved slotted piece where the depth is adjusted. If a screw could be made to fit the slot to keep it from turning, that would simplify adjusting it. And maybe a spring could be added somewhere to make the saw plunge. hmm...

Sorry, thinking out loud.
 

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Interesting approach. Reminds me of the old trick of adding rails to a long 2x 12 and laying grooved cross pieces (typically the grooved edge of tongue and groove siding with the top edge of the groove shaved off) on it to use for square and 45 degree cutoffs on the job site. A nice stable work surface as well.
 

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From what I saw, there's no "lowering the blade" into the cut, except maybe on the initial cut where he put the kerf in the jig - the jig overhangs the material, the saw laid in place with the blade not touching the material and the saw then started. As with all these type of jigs, I've always wondered why everybody makes the base out of 3/4" plywood - the one that I used for years was made out of 1/8" tempered Masonite, worked very well and at a fraction of the weight. After several years, I did have to move the fence over and recut the edges though.
 
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