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Ok,

I have some money saved up and am in need of a planer. I am looking at the dw735 or the grizzly G0453. I know that there is a difference in price (almost double) but, do you think that it is worth it? For a little background; I am a hobby woodworker. I like/want to make fine furniture and take pride in what I produce. Saying that, I am in NO way going to be mass producing cabinets or the such. I am building for friends, family and the occasional friend of a friend.

Can anyone attest to the quality differences and blade life of the grizzly vs the DW? I know that they are both three blade, but is one easier to change blades than the other?

Thanks guys for any help you might be able to give.
 

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Jon it's more about what you want to do with the planer that matters. Blades can be had from many sources, some much better than others, so that by itself isn't an issue. Installing them for most of the small planes is the same. You use a setting tool supplied by the maker. On higher end heads you start getting jack screw adjusted systems and then there are the segmented heads and spiral heads. You shouldn't be going through knives fast enough for installation to be a deal breaker.

The other factor is what you plan to push through it. I start with lots of rough sawn lumber so I need more size and power. The other consideration is what type wood. If it will be mostly softwoods then straight knives will do a good job. If it is highly figured wood and mostly hardwoods then a spiral head is a better option. If all you are doing is sizing lumber for a project then you can easily get by with the DW which has an excellent reputation and by going with it you can use the extra money you were considering spending for the larger planer and upgrade to a spiral head.
 

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I bought a Makita some years ago, just before the 735 came out, it works OK, but today I'd go for the DeWalt. I have roughly the same level of skill and projects so I don't think blade life is much of an issue. I really like the build of the 735. Seems very solid to me. Good dust collection too, according to the reviews. Just my opinion. Wish I had the budget to get the Dewalt.
 

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Well, the 453 is 15" vs 13" for 735. The Griz is 3HP, the DW more like 1.5HP. I don't think you would be unhappy with either.

Frankly, if had $1300 to spend on a planer, I'd consider getting the DW and putting a shelix head in it. About a grand and you'd get a number of advantages: long blade life, quieter operation, better "nick handling" and much better handling of figured wood.

If the shelix route wasn't in the cards, I'd probably opt for the griz because of the wider capacity and greater power.

One other issue to consider is snipe - the smaller planers are more susceptible.
 

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Assuming you have 240v in your shop.

The Grizzly looks like it belongs in a production shop.
 

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One other issue to consider is snipe - the smaller planers are more susceptible.
Phil I've read either here on the forum or elsewhere that the 735 doesn't leave much snipe, if any. Maybe some of their owners could join in.
 

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Fine WoodWorking April 2016, No. 253 the latest issue - has a 6 page 'Tool Test" of various portable planners -- Dewalt (2), Ridgid, Grizzly, Craftsman, Delta, General, Makita, Rikon(2), and Triton. You might find it very interesting.

The DeWalt 735X rated Best Overall, the Ridgid R4331 "Best Value, and compared very favourably to the DeWalt 735.

I have a GeeTech 15" planner. GeeTech probably makes the Grizzly unit you are considering, and re-labels/re-brands its tools for many manufacturers. It is a beast of machine and blade changing is a laborious, time consuming, royal PITA. The spiral cutter head insert change is easier, but costs US$700.00 more. It is a production machine.

Check grizzly's on-line owner's manual here: http://cdn2.grizzly.com/manuals/g0453p_m.pdf

From what I have been told by DeWalt 735 users, a blade change probably takes about 20 minutes.

If I was to do it all over, being a hobbyist I would go for the DeWalt 735 and give the Ridgid R4331 serious consideration. Too bad you do not live in WA, I could give you one-heck-of-a-deal on my 15" planner if you really wanted a 15" production type unit.
 

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I have the older version of the griz 15". I could see it in a lower end shop but it's definitely at home in my non-production shop. I switched mine to a shelix head - that was a bit of work - but the straight blade change did not seem to be that hard.

By the way, the DW blades are disposable, you can't sharpen them. They are double sided so you do get two lives out of a set. I believe they are easy to change because of this - there is no adjustment needed. With the griz, you can resharpen them so they require adjusting. However, with a magnetic jig (pretty cheap, iirc), it's fairly easy to adjust.
 

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There is an outstanding comparison of planers in the current issue of Fine Woodworking. It does a great comparison of planers. It didn't give the Grizzly high marks. Get a copy of that and read the article. It brings up issues most people would not consider until after they started using one.
 

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Fine WoodWorking April 2016, No. 253

The DeWalt 735X rated Best Overall, the Ridgid R4331 "Best Value, and compared very favourably to the DeWalt 735.


If I was to do it all over, being a hobbyist I would go for the DeWalt 735 and give the Ridgid R4331 serious consideration.


I've got the Ridgid, it's a great tool. You can overload the motor if you're not patient and try to take too big a cut. It leaves an outstanding finish for the money
 

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I've read that the Sellix head for the 735 is 1/8" smaller than the original making it 1/16 above the factory height. This could cause increased snipe as there would be increased pressure from the feed rollers. I would like shellix to make a head the right diameter and leave off the carbide cutters until after installation, seems like no brainer to me!
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Son of a gun..... I think it just got a little harder to decide!!!!

I am leaning more towards the DW, but if there is a problem with the shelix head.... hm.

And, if i look at the Rigid, then is the spiral head worth putting on it? Also, after doing some more research, I see that Cutech makes a lunch box that looks just like the Ridgid planer and has a "segmented" head....not quite a spiral cutter.

It is nice to have options, but it's making it hard to decide. Anyone have comparison of the Ridgid vs Cutech? Also, has anyone have opinions on the shelix on the Ridgid?
 

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Skip the cutech "spiral", there's a thread around here about it. The short answer is it's a distant echo of a real spiral.

Also, I think the FWW review was of benchtop planers, Griz sells lots of different planers and their benchtop ones look pretty bad but the one you asked about is not a benchtop.

I also had the Ridgid planer (bought used, sold when I bought my griz used) and it was ok but has plenty of plastic. Hands down, take the DW over the Ridgid.

By the way Wayne, having installed a shelix, I would not have wanted to screw in every cutter. Massive tedium. Just wrap the head with cardboard per their instructions and it's no problem. The cutters caused zero problems for me.

edit: to throw a little more gas on the fire. have you thought about buying used? I got my 15" griz for a bit north of $300. Needed a good tune up but it worked fine. I added a shelix for a total investment of about $1K. Very very happy with it.
 

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I own a 734 not a 735. Do you really need more than 12"? I built a butcher block counter top and a built in kitchen table. I did it in three sections Ran those glue ups thru planer and sander. Then glued the three sections Hand plane and scraper to finish. I too lusted after anything bigger than but practically I seldom buy any material that wide. My 734 is not as nice as the 735 but it has been very durable for 10 years
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I have been looking for used on CL for several months and haven't really found anything that is "worth" the asking price or worth buying at all. LOL

There is an old grizzly with Spiral head on CL that is listed for 3800 bucks... It is way more than what I need, but just giving an example.

I also just found that Rikon sells one with spiral head for 610.00, but as others have said....if I go that route I would rather get the shelix head.

What is really funny, I just read an article from 2013 where the view was against doing a spiral head. Stating that there was not that much of a difference via per price point.

I do like using a hand plane, but it is harder now that I am in a wheelchair. I try not to work with boards longer than 6ft, unless I need it for a top. Even then, 8ft is usually the max I can do safely by myself. Also, I don't like working with anything over 10" wide. It really isn't about weight as much as manipulation. I am sure it looks comical at times, seeing me fumble with a board and trying to push my wheelchair at the same time! I have tried to keep everything within reach in my shop so I can put one end of a board on my lap and the other on a piece of equipment. That way my hands are free to push the chair. Sometimes I only get one push and have to readjust before I go any further. LOL

Sorry for the rant..... what I was getting at, is that the more the planer can do towards glue-up, the less work I have to do by hand! So even if the helical/spiral head is just slightly better, then I might be worth me throwing a few extra bucks at it....

Thank you all for the input and help. I am going to sleep on it and do a little more reading/watching youtube, before I make my decision.
 

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I've had a 735 for about 3 years and it is excellent. based on my results my neighbor bought a used one is very happy with that one as well. the 725 does occasionally go on sale at Rockler.
 

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I've read that the Sellix head for the 735 is 1/8" smaller than the original making it 1/16 above the factory height. This could cause increased snipe as there would be increased pressure from the feed rollers. I would like shellix to make a head the right diameter and leave off the carbide cutters until after installation, seems like no brainer to me!
I've got the Shelix on my 735 and it was within a 1/32 of the original blades. And definitely no snipe. I love it and wish I had put it on from the beginning.
 

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It's interesting to note that you never hear "I put a shelix in and wish I hadn't" (or it was a waste of effort/money/time). You do hear comments like Rob's (and mine). Also, there are lots of videos on the net showing how to install a shelix in the 735. Looks pretty easy to me compared with having to open up the gear box on my griz. I'd do it again because of the benefits but it was a challenge.
 
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