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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all, trying to figure out how to replicate this bottom rail edge profile. Looks like a standard bead but it has a straight cut at the top as well.

If anyone knows what bit to use here that would be much appreciated. Also I suppose I could just do it in two passes with a straight and a bead bit.

View attachment 399271
 

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welcome to the forum, Cactus.
for starters, I would get some stock the size you want and practice to see what you can come up with.
my first start would be to cut a slice (noted in red) on the table saw then the bead-bearing bit in a hand-held router noted in yellow.
that's the easiest way I can think of without having a sample in hand to examine. some hand sanding will be involved.
are you going to replace the whole rail or just parts of it ?
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Looks as though it could also be done with 2 rectanlgular pieces of timber and a quad.
 

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My opinion is that its not made from seperate pieces of wood but the moulding is not one cutter either, looking at it then it would not be that hard to make a new piece using two cutters. A rebate type cutter for the inside step then a quarter round cutter for the outside radius. N
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Hello and thank you all for the welcome and the responses.
It's definitely not two pieces of wood.
I will be replacing a large section and adding another 25 feet or so of railing.
I think I will first try the table saw first for the ledge and then use the router for the bead.
Will report back with how it goes.
 

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Hello and thank you all for the welcome and the responses.
It's definitely not two pieces of wood.
I will be replacing a large section and adding another 25 feet or so of railing.
I think I will first try the table saw first for the ledge and then use the router for the bead.
Will report back with how it goes.

Do the step with A router cutter, it will give far better finish than a saw blade will. N
 

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Looks like a job for a shaper?
 
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Cactus - don't know if you have it figured out yet or not . . . .
but, here is an example of what I came up with. making a short prototype, I used the flat bottom pattern bit to make the first cut (in red) and then I had to remove the bearing from my bead bit to get a deeper profile (in yellow). a clamped straight edge was used for both cuts as I don't have a router table so both cuts were free-hand.
with minor adjustments, you can come very close to the profile that you need.

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When I was confronted with a compound pattern that had a 3" profile, I made a cardboard pattern of the profile and sent it to a specialty house in Los Angeles. They sent me a router bit, 3" long of solide carbide of the exact profile I sent them. I suggest you do that. I made the arrangement through a local sharpening service, so I don't know the name of the company. I'm sure that some detective work would reveal its name.

A propos duplicating an unusual profile, a woman came to me with an antique grandfather's clock whose molding had broken off. It was a double bead with a flat section in-between the beads and curved to follow the curve of the clock: nothing that could be cut with a machine. So I researched the problem on the web and made a scratch cutter made from an old saw blade and some wood scraps that held the scratch awl (I believe that was the term). It worked very well.
 

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