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Hi, A friend pulled this out of a dumpster, along with another tool, and gave it to me. I have looked and looked and cannot identify it. May I get some help? The only marking on it is ? / 8. Appreciate it. Chris
 

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Hi, A friend pulled this out of a dumpster, along with another tool, and gave it to me. I have looked and looked and cannot identify it. May I get some help? The only marking on it is ? / 8. Appreciate it. Chris
Actually it isn't a hammer even though it needs a handle it's a lead seaming anvil...
Sheets of lead are edge folded together similar to a snap lock seam...
The operator then slides this tool down the seam while pounding on it with a 3 to 5 pound hammer...
the handle facilitates holding it in place during striking... faster to operate one with a handle than the type w/o one.... Very fast...
Haven't used one of those since the late 50's early 60's...
 

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Cool Stick. I knew it wasn't a hammer, but didn't know what it was. Now I do.
 

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Since you won't be using it I would leave the head as is, maybe add a nice hickory handle?
 

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Chris, I had no idea of what that was, but THANK YOU for sharing it. To me and many others that type of "Show and Tell" is super interesting. My Great Grand Father was a very skilled woodworker and I have seen lots of things he built from homes to furniture and even windows. When my Dad died in Jan 2012, my brother had no interest in my Dad's "Old Tool Collection", so it all went to me. Often I look at those (somewhat crude) tools and think how much skill the old man (GGF) must have had! It really gives us an appreciation for what is available nowadays!

Otis Guillebeau from Auburn, Georgia
 

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seamon anvil

Actually it isn't a hammer even though it needs a handle it's a lead seaming anvil...
Sheets of lead are edge folded together similar to a snap lock seam...
The operator then slides this tool down the seam while pounding on it with a 3 to 5 pound hammer...
the handle facilitates holding it in place during striking... faster to operate one with a handle than the type w/o one.... Very fast...
Haven't used one of those since the late 50's early 60's...
So what would the " ? /8 " mean? Did they come in different size profiles?
 

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So what would the " ? /8 " mean? Did they come in different size profiles?
can't remember for sure if ?/8 was for seam width or thickness of the lead but I'm going with width...
as soon as I saw those pics my whole arm and shoulder really started aching.... SNORK!!!
all being ambidextrous gets you is both arms and shoulders ache equally bad...
 

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Chris, I had no idea of what that was, but THANK YOU for sharing it. To me and many others that type of "Show and Tell" is super interesting. My Great Grand Father was a very skilled woodworker and I have seen lots of things he built from homes to furniture and even windows. When my Dad died in Jan 2012, my brother had no interest in my Dad's "Old Tool Collection", so it all went to me. Often I look at those (somewhat crude) tools and think how much skill the old man (GGF) must have had! It really gives us an appreciation for what is available nowadays!
My grandfather was what they now term a 'master carpenter', correctly it would be a journyman carpenter, but times change; he was a man with amazing woodworking talent. I helped him with various projects when I was somewhere between about 7 and 10, I'm 72 now, do the math. He had a large table saw, and that was about it as far as power tools went. Later he promised me a huge homebuilt tool chest, with the lid full of various types of saws, the box had at least a dozen of wooden hand planes, of various contours, and so on, it was packed. When he died, I was in Germany at the time I believe. When I got back and asked about the chest, I was told it was all sold. The wooden planes went for $1 each, apparently some guy bought the whole chest for about $100. I felt like crying. The chest and contents at that time was probably worth at least several hundreds more, and no telling how much now. I wasn't interested in selling any of it, I wanted to keep them all. You're a very fortunate man.
 

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come to think of it...
that looks just like the one I threw away when I thought nobody was looking...
guess it wasn't thrown far enough..
 

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I would say that it's actually a blacksmithing "fuller" - used in pairs, the top one (as pictured) with a handle, the bottom attached to the anvil.

Used to make an iron bar circular in cross-section, and of a specific diameter - I'm guessing thats what the ?/8 is - 5/8?

If you plan to use it, remove the mushrooming - it's very uncomfortable having a piece removed from your flesh :.(
 

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A interesting piece of history,, necessity the mother of invention. How things have progressed.

Nice find.
 

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Seaming or Forming tool. Metal Works

This tool is used in the forming or closing a seam in sheet metal work.It is a preferred tool for Copper and Tinsmiths

A hammer action is applied to the head of the tool which placed over the folded seam and worked along its length to give you radius finish. The tool comes in various shapes depending on your required cross-section I have used it for bespoke metal crafting esp. aluminum and thin gauge panel steel.

It is a marvelous tool and when placed upside down in a anvil I use the radius or what ever cross-section I have determined as a forming tool. Eg. A round metal rod to half round. Very simple and with a bit of practice a smooth surface. This method is also referred to as "Swaging".

The hammer is applied to the round cross-section in the groove (radius) changing the shape to half round. The bonus is you have no waste of material and with the price of copper a substantial saving.

If you wish to know more in particular let me know.


Cheers Aurum
 
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