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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Greetings to all!!

I have an idea for saving me a lot of time, but it is going to require the use of an extension for this 1.5" diameter bottom-cleaning bit.

Amana Bottom Cleaning Bit

In order to use this bit for my project, the bit will have to extend at a very minimum, 1-3/8" beyond the router base plate. This means that the collet will only have about 3/4" of bit shank to lock on to. And, this is assuming that the bit is actually 2-3/4" in length as advertised.

I have never used a bit extension because IMO they seem unsafe to use, but here I am needing to use one.

Here is a shot of a gate insert that I recently completed. The blue members are very time consuming to cut. My client would like for me to make 36-40 of these, if I'm willing.

Green Blue Wood Line Aqua


In my neck of the woods the blue segments are called 'lightning bolts' and are based on a Native American design. I used my band saw to cut each of these and they are very time consuming and require sharp chisel touch-up when done. So my plan is to clamp all (or half) of these boards together and use a fixture to hold the router at an angle and cut each flat section in several light passes, move either the router or the boards, and repeat until done.

Note. Each line segment is approximately 1-3/8" in length which is why I am using a bit with a diameter of 1-1/2".

This is the template I use to outline each board before band sawing.

Green Light Product Blue Line


So, as can be seen, each lightning bolt has 20 line segments that have to be cut. A router would make this a simple task, or so I think. I am not there yet.

So my question, can someone recommend a good bit extension that they have had experience with?

Thanks,
Phillip
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I should have added that a similar bit with a long 1/2" shaft would work, but I suspect that these bit designer's limit the shank length due to safety concerns. I could be wrong in this thinking.

Thanks.
 

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for me personally, and several others here, have quite a bit of bandsaw experience.
this would be a no-brainer to do the whole project with the BS only and no use of a router. (unless you wanted to round over the edges a bit.
Routers and Bits have sizes specific for their applications - - - tampering with those tolerances can only mean exposing yourself to some serious consequences later down the road.
Edit: Option "B" would be to make a mold and cast them either in resin, plaster or cement.
then all you need is 2 perfect patterns, make the mold, and cast two at a time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
@John Smith_

Thank you for your post.

I just re-read my original post and I was not clear in the task that I have been asked to do: I need to make 40 of the gate inserts that I posted an image of. Each insert contains 10 lightning bolts (LBs) as shown. Each LB requires twenty (20) band saw cuts. Twenty x ten = 200 band saw cuts per gate insert. Now multiply that times 40 and you get 8000 band saw cuts, if my math is correct.

This is why I wanted to rig up a router jig that would allow me to route several LB segments in a single pass. When I say 'segment' I am referring to each flat of the LB. Looking again at my template:

Green Light Product Blue Line


each edge has ten flats, making 20 flats for the whole LB member.

If it becomes practical to clamp ten LBs together then I could make ten (10) LBs with 20 router passes. At the moment this is hypothetical chatter. Once I construct the rig I will be a lot wiser. Or not!

Sorry for the confusion.
 

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how thick are they and what wood ?? what size is your router ?
I can see how a table saw could gang-cut several at at time (IF they are like 1/2" plywood) once a jig is properly set up.

and my feeble brain is still stuck on "using a bit with a diameter of 1-1/2". I don't see how that fits into this pattern.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
@John Smith_
I hear you loud and clear on all of your concerns.

The stock is cedar, so it very soft wood. The width to be cut is 1-1/2". Router's I have several ranging from my workbench Milwaukee 5625 beast, a Bosch 1613EVS and two trimmers, so I'm good in that respect.

As you suggested, I do 'see' a table saw rig to cut these. I own a K3 Hammer so I would have to rig up a sacrifical sled/fence, but all of that is doable.

Yes, a 1-1/2" diameter router bit seems unreasonalbe when viewed from a safety perspective, so I'm going to back off of that for the time being. A table saw rig would be a LOT safer, I just have to rig up a sled to cut this stock.

Thanks for the kick in the pants. Ha!!
 

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Paul
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Don't know if I understand what you describe. Unless you have a bit that matches the V (that would be a very big bit) I can't see how this will work. You have to have room for the base of the router. Table saws typically only go to 45 degrees, not likely enough for this. I think the best way would be to pin a few boards together and cut them on a bandsaw.
Product Rectangle Font Parallel Diagram
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
@TenGees

Thanks for the inspiring image, Paul.

This is what I was planning:

Creative arts Font Pattern Design Triangle


The router - Bosch 1.25 Colt, in this case - would be rotated and held in a rig. The above image is close, but not to scale.

In practice, the Bosch would be attached to a rig sans the base. All of the stock would be held together firmly and the router would make several passes to flatten each segment or surface.

Until my client gives me the go ahead to make the forty gate inserts, this will remain on my to-do list.

Thanks.
 

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Paul
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Can't help you there... I've never used one. If that'd be safe they might sell one? Or maybe they expect you to use a bigger router?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
You're right. In one of the MC videos, the gentleman mentions that they have an extended router collet. From that I assumed that a 1/2"-to-1/4" bushing would work. However, they have that covered as well in their second video.

Too pricey for me.

Thanks.
 

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@TenGees

Thanks for the inspiring image, Paul.

This is what I was planning:

View attachment 401568

The router - Bosch 1.25 Colt, in this case - would be rotated and held in a rig. The above image is close, but not to scale.

In practice, the Bosch would be attached to a rig sans the base. All of the stock would be held together firmly and the router would make several passes to flatten each segment or surface.

Until my client gives me the go ahead to make the forty gate inserts, this will remain on my to-do list.

Thanks.
A Bosch Colt will struggle with 1.5" bit. Also 1/4 shank extended that far will fail in short order.
Also think about all the chips you will be making with a router removing all that waste.
I also suggest a table saw with incremental fixture.
 

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My experience is it's always faster and more efficient to saw stock if possible because you're not reducing the waste to shavings. I would try using a skip tooth band saw blade with M42 teeth (if I could order one or have it ground) I'd consult a blade expert to see if my blade choice would yield the desired finish without sanding. A miter slot jig that has a fin indexer set at correct angle so that each cut will fall at the exact desired distance from the previous one, like a box joint jig on a table saw, would speed your operation faster than a router table. A stop in the miter slot would stop the jig at the exact penetration. Double sided tape between two pieces would allow two for one cutting, and flipping the pieces over and swapping ends could allow an end stop to be used for the first cut so the jig settings don't have to change through the whole operation. It looks like a 14" B/S would do the trick, but I wouldn't saw over 3" thick because your quality of cut is limited by the .025 band thickness.
 
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