Router Forums banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am looking for the general approach (technique/strategy, componentry used, etc.) to implement what I am calling a power supply router, although perhaps there is a more precise/accurate term for it.

By "power supply router" (PSR), what I mean is this:

  • A device, say some PCB (doesn't really matter) will connect to this PSR and expect it to be its power supply, but...
  • The PSR itself is not an actual power supply; it is simply a circuit/component/thing that uses a simple routing algorithm to draw power from one of several actual power supplies at any given time
  • In other words, the router will strive to always provide power (if the device is toggled to be "on" via power button, etc.) from one of many power supplies, and can switch the actual power supply it is using at any point in time (only during operation of course) according to this algorithm

And a diagram for illustration:

Text Diagram Line Parallel Symmetry


In that diagram Power Supply #1 (PS1), #2, #3, #4 and #n are the actual power supplies (batteries, solar panels, whatever). The device connects to the router, expecting it to supply it with power, but the router will only be connected to one PS at any given time.

The algorithm I am looking to implement is very simple:

  • For all the power supplies in the system, find the first supply that isn't "nearly dead" and set it as the current supply
  • Once the current supply is nearly dead, obtain the next non-nearly dead supply and set that as the current supply
  • Only when all power supplies are dead/nerly dead is the system officially out of power

I'm sure the "nearly dead" part requires better explanation. Here, the router simply needs to be able to determine whether the given supply is almost dead, perhaps based on the amount of volts or amps its currently outputting, or based on some gas gauging component like what cell phones use to show you that your smart phone is at "2%".

I'm wondering if this type of "routing multiple power supplies" need is a well known pattern in EE, with well known solutions? Either way, what are my options here for implementing such a router & routing algorithm as a circuit? What components could be used?
 

·
Registered
Theo
Joined
·
7,195 Posts
I disagree.
 

·
Premium Member
Retired since June 2000
Joined
·
15,065 Posts
I'm sure we are all on the same page in believing that this gentleman is not talking wood-working routers!
 
  • Like
Reactions: RainMan 2.0

·
Registered
Mike
Joined
·
3,959 Posts
  • Like
Reactions: Herb Stoops

·
Registered
Joined
·
815 Posts
Are you sure you need an algorithm or a simple transfer switch. A transfer switch will allow you to move seamlessly from one power source to another when power is lost on the original source without a burnout on the non used PS. Think about a house with power from an incoming line and from a generator. You are required to have the switch to prevent feedback between the sources. If you are generating power from solar panels you should already have a switch in place to protect power company employees (and your equipment).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,603 Posts
He must know a lot about the routers he is looking for because I don' understand anything he is talking about. That makes he and I about even.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
815 Posts
He must know a lot about the routers he is looking for because I don' understand anything he is talking about. That makes he and I about even.
Hawkeye: I agree that he is probably NOT talking about our kind of routers and most of us don't have a clue. He can do what he wants electronically but I'm trying to figure out why he need (or has) that many power sources. I remember just enough from my NAVY electronics schools to be dangerous, and all of that stuff advances very rapidly. I probably wouldn't recognize half of the components on a printed circuit board now days. :wink:
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top