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I was told there might be a few in this group that might have some advice for a beginner to help build a router table for the first piece of garage shop, table saw next. Plan on lift kit for PC 890. Looking for table layout, fence guides, hold down gear and other items of interest.
I am wide open to suggestions but limited to garage (3 car) space, that is if wife parks outside. Yea like I will get away with that, so need shop equipment and surfaces to move. Hopefully some may have some thoughts on this...
 

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Welcome JD. Here is a link to other posts on the subject of router tables: Table-mounted Routing - Router Forums That will give you quite a few ideas and things to think about. I prefer offsetting my router to one side of the table and being able to work from either side because it's nice when working with small or narrow pieces to have them close to you and if you need more table room for larger projects like panels you can work from the other side. A few like theirs offset both centered and side to side. There is no right or wrong way, mostly it's about your preferences. Have a look at what others have done and then open a discussion thread and we can discuss what the pros and cons of any one design are.

When you have time finish filling out your profile. We are a friendly bunch and we like to know who we are talking to.
 

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Hello and welcome to the router forum there is a lot of information here on router tables try the Community search engine
 

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Welcome to the forum , you've come to the right place ;)
 

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Welcome to the forum.
 

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Welcome to the forum, JD.
 

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Welcome to the forum. My shop is a two car garage and there is no way I can get away with leaving the wife's car outside so everything has to be mobile. I have two router setups. The first one is just a basic router table top that I sit across 2 collapsible steel sawhorses made by Trojan, They come in 27" and 35" inch heights. I have the 27". You used a 2Xwhatever as the cross piece so you can make them as wide as you want and if I need something a little taller I can use a 2X6 or 2X8 instead of a 2X4. I use a Dewalt DW625 router on this setup. This was the first setup I did around 20 years ago.

The second setup I now use most often is attached to the right side wing of the tablesaw. Many folks just replace the left side wing with the router wing but I had the room to mount mine on the right side since I have a long fence. I use a Triton TRA001 router. I purchased the router wing from MLCS. This router is height adjustable from above the table and was designed for table use. My tablesaw is mounted on a mobile base. I built my own small portable dust collector that I also built a mobile base for. It slides under the tablesaw when not needed. The hose shown fits the dust collection port on the router and use a Y collector to also attach a hose to the fence dust port. I used the DustRight parts from Rockler and a 1HP collector from Harbor Freight attached to a small fibre drum.

I use a PC 690 for hand held work.
 

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For What It is Worth:

Before committing to any size router table/router cabinet, carefully think about what you would like to do and available space. An internet search for constructing a router table/cabinet will yield a mind boggling number of web pages/links, threads, videos, etc.

As a self-professed neophyte, suggest purchasing books. I find that often times a book is a handier and faster reference than an internet search. Bill Hylton authored several router books and I recommend them. Some might be at your local library or a well-stocked book store. I purchase most from used book dealers such as AbeBooks or Alibris. See: https://www.abebooks.com and Alibris - Buy new and used books, textbooks, music and movies

Back-In-the-Day, I started with my ol’ tried and true PC 690 router mounted to a piece a ¾” plyw’d (about 12 x 18”, clamped to my bench. fence was a 1X3 piece of hardwood, clamped in place where neeed. Adjustments made by loosening a clamp and the ever-present Fine Adjusting Tool (tack hammer). After seeing Bob and Rick Rosendahl’s demonstration at a 1990’s wood show, I purchased their now no longer available Oak Park Router table which served me very well. Very compact; light weight.

Then I told myself that I just needed a New Yankee Workshop ACFDS router cabinet (aircraft carrier flight deck size). Flash forward ‘bout fifteen years: after using this table (approximately 24 X 32”), I realized for the work I do the table is too big and a “catch all” when not in us, cabinet takes up needed floor space, etc.

Now I am back to Square One. Build a smaller table with an approximately 16 x 24” top and a stout box for the bits. Two piece cabinet. Separable upper for router and top if needed to transport, etc. Lower compartment for the bit box. Since it will be small and lighter weight, do not think that 4 or 5” casters will needed. Something akin the Harbor Fright (Harbor Freight to the initiated) hopefully will work. See:
300 Lb. Capacity Mobile Base

Earlier, I posted this link to a compact, can be clamped to workbench router table:
One-weekend Router Table - Popular Woodworking Magazine
 
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