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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all, interesting site! Looks like there are several of you who use t-track, so here is my question for you:
I just finished a 4'x8' (top) workbench. I have purchased t-track: 2- 36" tracks and 1- 4-way junction. How do I lay these out?
I want to use them mainly for holding down materials for the miter saw and for sanding.

Do I put them 90 degrees to each other? Parallel? What are your ideas for this? I have included my bench and have the tracks laid out on top for now, but I am hesitant to cut the groove until I know what will work best for me. TIA!
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Hi all, interesting site! Looks like there are several of you who use t-track, so here is my question for you:
I just finished a 4'x8' (top) workbench. I have purchased t-track: 2- 36" tracks and 1- 4-way junction. How do I lay these out?
I want to use them mainly for holding down materials for the miter saw and for sanding.

Do I put them 90 degrees to each other? Parallel? What are your ideas for this? I have included my bench and have the tracks laid out on top for now, but I am hesitant to cut the groove until I know what will work best for me. TIA! View attachment 401519
Welcome Scott! I like the use of space in your shop as well as the shop itself. Unfortunately after you think it through that is something you are going to have to decide on based on what you will be making. Here's a link to a Rockler Top that may give you an idea.
Most people have a fence for the miter saw which makes clamping a lot easier. I would look at adding a fence rather than t-tracks. You may have an issue cutting a large piece on your table saw with the miter saws location. Their is plenty of space for the t-tracks. Keep in mind you may want to add more tracks later on.
 

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T Track is very easy to install using a flat bottom bit, like a mortising bit, that's ever so slightly wider than the track itself. You lay it in with an accurate T Square, then clamp a straight edge inplace to guide your router.

I'd wait until you need to use one, then install it. One really good use is a short track on each side of your router table's bit opening. Not too far from the edge. Then you can use them to position and lock down your fence using T Bolts with star knobs.

One thing I do suggest is that where your table saw ends, that you extend the miter tracks in the saw out into the outfeed table. Don't add T Track, just leave them open so if you have miter bars on a jig, you can slide them off the end of the saw and onto the outfeed table. If you don't have any table saw jigs now, I bet it won't be long before you do. I have several jigs like that, and my favorite is the Rockler table saw sled. Here's a picture. Lining up a T Track in that outfeed groove isn't necessary and getting it to line up precisely to the saw's miter slots is near impossible.
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But again, I'd think several times over about installing them until you know how you'll use them. With a plywood bench top, you don't want to cut through that thin outer ply layer until you really have it worked out.

Good first question, glad you found us.
 

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G'day @scottm_1532 , and welcome to the forum.

I don't recall ever clamping a workpiece to the mitre saw for cutting, unless it was a very small piece. In that case I would use the built in clamp to hold it against the fence.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
G'day @scottm_1532 , and welcome to the forum.

I don't recall ever clamping a workpiece to the mitre saw for cutting, unless it was a very small piece. In that case I would use the built in clamp to hold it against the fence.
Hi. Sometimes, when I am cutting multiple pieces that all need to be the same length, I clamp a stop-board to the miter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Welcome Scott! I like the use of space in your shop as well as the shop itself. Unfortunately after you think it through that is something you are going to have to decide on based on what you will be making. Here's a link to a Rockler Top that may give you an idea.
Most people have a fence for the miter saw which makes clamping a lot easier. I would look at adding a fence rather than t-tracks. You may have an issue cutting a large piece on your table saw with the miter saws location. Their is plenty of space for the t-tracks. Keep in mind you may want to add more tracks later on.
No issue with the outfeed from table saw. My miter shelf folds down and out of the way.
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Welcome aboard Scott.

Each of us have developed or adopted certain ways to accomplish our projects and for each of us the most comfortable and safest way is what we usually do. For repeatable cuts I have a fence on my miter station that has T Track on the wooden fence where I use sliding blocks that lock down to make accurate cuts. I usually will lock the blade down and measure carefully from the blade and adjust my stop block. Do a test cut on scrap and check measurement. Adjust if needed and go from there, A fence is very helpful especially cutting long pieces. See here for my miter station. Keep in mind that this is a fixed fence but you could easily build one for each side and have 2 or 3 small sections of T Track installed in your table to allow you to install the fence on both sides if and when you need them and squaring up with the miter fence . Slotting that fence as I have will allow adjustable stop blocks to be used as needed.

Just an idea.
 

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I'm with others who are advocating building a fence for both sides and using the t-track in that for stop blocks. With your wood top, it would be easy to make them removable so you have the flat surface for other tasks, by just inserting threaded inserts. Then, build an "L" shaped fence with a couple of hold downs that thread in those inserts. Remove or install in seconds and you'll have the t-track on the face so ready for any length stop block. Not to mention, the long fences are very handy for keep the stock secure when using the mitre saw.
 

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