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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Very happy with my new Bosch 1617 kit. Thanks to everyone for your suggestions.

Now I'm looking for a table saw. The Bosch 4100-10 seems to have a good following here, but I'm also considering a mid-range cabinet model.

Grizzly and Shop Fox have saws in the 1100-1800 dollar range that have good reviews. I'm certainly not adverse to a used model. I have 220 in my shop so that's a positive.

I'll not need to cut 4x8 sheets as I can do that outside my shop with a circular saw. So an overly large table, while nice in thoughts, is not probably necessary. It would also be nice if there's potential to build an inset router table eventually to save some space.

Any suggestions and advice will be appreciated. It will be wonderful to do research while recuperating. Thanks.

Steve
 

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I'll not need to cut 4x8 sheets as I can do that outside my shop with a circular saw. So an overly large table, while nice in thoughts, is not probably necessary.
Maybe not necessary, but oh so nice on those nasty rain days, or in the dead of winter. I just wish I had enough space to do that. Big plus, wouldn't have to hunt long for a place to set your coffee cup.
 

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what ever you do, don't sell that 4100 short...
in and out feed tables are way more important than width...
 

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Rick
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The most important thing to me on a table saw is the fence. I’ve used too many cheaper models that had terrible fences . At some point you get tired of banging the ends of the fence to get it square once it’s locked down .
So my first saw was a delta contractors table saw, but it came with a Biesemeyer fence .
Love that fence , as it’s pretty solid .

On my new general cabinet saw I have a really large wing , and I took the easy way out and mounted my pc690’s base underneath.
It’s basically for doing round overs, so I didn’t get to carried away , but I do intend on putting a proper plate in it someday.

I have the large fence , think it’s 56” , and regret it. If I did it again I’d buy the 36” fence , and just use my track saw to break down large sheets .
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It's too easy for me to open the garage door, take out saw horses, breakdown sheet goods using my circular saw with Emerson edge clamps (best I've found so far and so easy to use) than to have excess side-table on the saw that would go to waste.

My shop space is not unlimited, I don't like shops and setups that require acrobatics to get around in, I like a clean and organized space, and I also plan to have a 14-inch band saw as well.

Bigger is not always better for me. When I was in law enforcement there were always the guys that thought an S&W M49 44 magnum was what they needed until they discovered they couldn't handle it.

I try to keep my ego out of the way.
 

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It's too easy for me to open the garage door, take out saw horses, breakdown sheet goods using my circular saw with Emerson edge clamps (best I've found so far and so easy to use) than to have excess side-table on the saw that would go to waste.

My shop space is not unlimited, I don't like shops and setups that require acrobatics to get around in, I like a clean and organized space, and I also plan to have a 14-inch band saw as well.

Bigger is not always better for me. When I was in law enforcement there were always the guys that thought an S&W M49 44 magnum was what they needed until they discovered they couldn't handle it.

I try to keep my ego out of the way.
I like the way you think . I’m in the same boat , and my garage is very busy , especially since I started welding and used up more room yet .
I’ve gotten some great ideas from this forum , and will use them this year to maximize my limited room .
May just cut my fence down to 36” while I’m at it . I think the best thing I did was invest in a track saw. I hated cutting large sheets down before , but now it’s a cake walk, and I can do super accurate cuts plus angled cuts
 

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I'm with Stick on the out feed table. I had one that was about 3 feet past the saw. It wasn't long enough so I replaced with one that is over 4 feet past the blade. Anything is better than nothing. If you need to keep the saw portable then hinge the out feed table to the saw so that you can lift it once it's in position. For the infeed you can use the roller stands but they don't work very well for the out feed. You usually wind up knocking them over before the board or panel gets over the top of it and starts rolling.

I also agree with the fence being a good one that locks securely and square. The old Rockwell Beaver saws were decent saws and had a decent fence although I replaced the one on mine with an Accusquare/Mule fence which is better than the OEM. I got the Rockwell for $100 from a friend and it came wired for 220.
 
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Give the Laguna Hybrid saw a look. Has a motor that runs on 110 or 220. Fine workmanship. Flat table, easily set up or moved by one person. Ample power. Available in 36 and 54 inch models. Add an outfeed table. I love that saw. And, it comes with a Biesmeier type fence, heavy duty fence, very accurate. Sometimes on sale through Rockler for 10 percent off. Take a look at the heavy duty mechanics and construction of this saw, very well made. And did I mention FLAT! I picked mine up from Rockler, and one of the wings had a slight curve (about 1mm), so I called Laguna to see about a replacement. Their warehouse is about an hour away, so they suggested I bring the saw in so they can check on it. When I got there, they had a brand new saw set up for me. They used some machined stainless steel straight bars and used feeler gauge. One small area was off by 15 thousandths, which is flat by any standard.

I really like the quality of the fence. Even the miter gauge is pretty good. It is a very simple machine, I'd call it elegant.

And yes, the Bosch 4100 is a heck of a good saw. A friend of mine built a stand with a table exactly the height of the saw and it made a really nice unit.
 

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I'm with Stick on the out feed table. I had one that was about 3 feet past the saw. It wasn't long enough so I replaced with one that is over 4 feet past the blade. Anything is better than nothing. If you need to keep the saw portable then hinge the out feed table to the saw so that you can lift it once it's in position. For the infeed you can use the roller stands but they don't work very well for the out feed. You usually wind up knocking them over before the board or panel gets over the top of it and starts rolling.

I also agree with the fence being a good one that locks securely and square. The old Rockwell Beaver saws were decent saws and had a decent fence although I replaced the one on mine with an Accusquare/Mule fence which is better than the OEM. I got the Rockwell for $100 from a friend and it came wired for 220.
Chuck,
The thing I found with out feed rollers on stands is that if they are not exactly parallel to the table saw tables they will track the piece being cut either toward the fence or away. And when a person is feeding the material into the saw he surely doesn't want to fight the alignment of the board.
That and what you mentioned about tipping over.

Herb
 

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Rick
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Chuck,
The thing I found with out feed rollers on stands is that if they are not exactly parallel to the table saw tables they will track the piece being cut either toward the fence or away. And when a person is feeding the material into the saw he surely doesn't want to fight the alignment of the board.
That and what you mentioned about tipping over.

Herb
I tried rollers first for an outfield support . I believe they ended up in the dumpster , never again. I intentionally built my assembly table a little lower than my table saw in order to use it as an outfeed table . Thinking of following Mikes idea and making one that has a router built in , and has adjustable height .
I seen a great idea before for a temporary infield support . I’ll try to find it

Found the link . Thanks to Bill aka schnewj for the idea :)


 

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Chuck,
The thing I found with out feed rollers on stands is that if they are not exactly parallel to the table saw tables they will track the piece being cut either toward the fence or away. And when a person is feeding the material into the saw he surely doesn't want to fight the alignment of the board.
That and what you mentioned about tipping over.

Herb
the fix for that is ball rollers...
can be had in singles..
.
 

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Canadian Tire sells a stand that has a roller and transfer balls. You flip it from one to the other. My son has two of them which he has left in my shop for a while now so I use them most of the time instead of my roller stand which has a bad habit of doing what you mentioned Herb.
 

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From your message I clearly noted your budget concerns. I too had them, but I don't regret getting a 3 hp SawStop with a mobile base. I can move my baby 360 degrees around the shop with one hand.

Its dust collection, top and bottom, is great.

With my SS I hope to "meet my maker" wearing all ten digits! That in itself is worth the higher price! How much would you pay for a finger after you chop it off with a table saw without a brake? I get scared when watching some guys using a table saw on YouTube; they pass their hands within 2 inches (even less) from the blade!

Yes, I did use a table saw without a brake, and that's why I chose to replace it with a SS.

I added a 12" cast iron wing, and a cast iron router table on the right side, and I can still waltz my SS across the shop with one hand. I did this before SS made available its own SS router table and router lift. So, I had to cobble a way to secure the fence.

An option to a table saw could be a track saw with guides. I'm thinking of gifting such to my son.

I've read that the federal government may be considering requiring all table saw manufacturers to install brakes in their products.

Think safefy first. No, I don't get commissions from SawStop.

Respectfully.
 

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Lots of good suggestion but I'll stick with my SawStop 36" PCS. The safety factor means a good deal to me and it's top quality to boot. It is a bit more but then figure in one trip to the emergency room, stitches if you're lucky, and so on and it justifies itself quickly. At least to me and my father-in-law was a living example. Fortunate for him when he had his accident the ability to reattach fingers was a new procedure. Wasn't pretty but effective. And they even have a router table for the auxiliary side of the saw.

44 mag huh? Must have been over compensating for something.....My first and only time on the range with one was more than enough. I did carry a Colt Python 357 Mag but my favorite was my first, a 1917 Army issue colt 45. A very smooth shooting revolver that required half moon clips to adapt 45 auto ammo. And that was back in the early '70s when pay was dismal and you qualified for food stamps when hired. Thankfully I was single and had money saved up. But that's another story.........

As for outfeed tables I built this one from Fine Woodworking And when you look at bandsaws consider the Laguna 14-12. Not saying there are others but mine has served me well and there are no necessary upgrades to do to it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I haven't used a table saw in thirty years, but I have always had a healthy respect for the damage they can do in a hurry. Like you I'm amazed at some of the supposed "youtube woodworking blowhards" who constantly endanger themselves with poor skills and obliviousness to safety.

Did you look at other SS before deciding on the 3hp? I'm not looking for a wide extension, but would be interested in a router table insert and mobile base.

Yes, it is more to pay, but overall it's cheaper than another wife. And never having kids mean I have no obligation to set-up kids to be professional and ungrateful wastrels.

As a user, have you found any cons to the SS? Any other info you can give me would be appreciated. Thanks,

Steve
 

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I like my Laguna hybrid, but then I don't have 220 in my shop. The build on the Laguna is beefy, same with the fourteen/12 bandsaw. I'd like to see the end of the power play by the SS inventor. Bosch in the rest of the world has a non destructive blade stop that just instantly drops the blade into the saw without destroying the blade. But the SS is fighting it in the courts here, so much for their safety intentions. Too bad, I think that Bosch has a more practical safety system, particularly for small shops. I hope that once Bosch wins the suit (their method is different, but all touch sensors work the same way), and then licenses the system to all makers nice and cheap to drive SS out of business. Strong letter to follow.
 

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I like my Laguna hybrid, but then I don't have 220 in my shop. The build on the Laguna is beefy, same with the fourteen/12 bandsaw. I'd like to see the end of the power play by the SS inventor. Bosch in the rest of the world has a non destructive blade stop that just instantly drops the blade into the saw without destroying the blade. But the SS is fighting it in the courts here, so much for their safety intentions. Too bad, I think that Bosch has a more practical safety system, particularly for small shops. I hope that once Bosch wins the suit (their method is different, but all touch sensors work the same way), and then licenses the system to all makers nice and cheap to drive SS out of business. Strong letter to follow.
I have to say the Laguna TS looks like a nice setup . Not sure how it compares to the Bies fence , but it looks similar .
I actually bought the dust collection hood for the SS ,as it looks to be about the best design for dust collection I have seen. I have to modify it so it fits where my riving knife did .
I like Bosches touch system much more than SS though ,and wish all companies used it
 

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As a user, have you found any cons to the SS? Any other info you can give me would be appreciated. Thanks,

Steve
The SS uses a cartridge braking system that clamps onto the saw blade, stopping it instantly. In the process both the cartridge and the saw blade are destroyed. The system works on the saw sensing the capacitance of flesh. This is nothing new, it's the same as the solid state elevator floor buttons that Otis has been using since I was fairly young. It's been reported that the cartridge can be triggered by sawing wet wood. You can turn the system off but you have to remember to do that and turn it back on again once you are done with the wet wood. And of course there is no protection when you do this. Many of us believe that it makes more sense to just use safe work practices so that you don't risk getting cut to start with. Plus those practices work for all your other shop equipment which don't utilize that type technology. As far as quality goes, I haven't heard anything bad about the saw. I doubt SawStop makes it. It probably only uses their brake technology.
 
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