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I've just bought a Record Power RPMS-R/MK2 router table.
https://www.dm-tools.co.uk/product.php/section/4581/sn/RPWRPMSR#.W3SMKc5KjIU
I contacted Record Power custumer service see below.
" I can get a feeler gauge under the straightedge, 0.8, 0.7 and 0.6mm. "

What do forum members say,would this gap affect the accuracy of the router table in any relavent way? Also using the same precision straightedge. I laid the edge across the cast iron table on both sides, going over the aluminium sliding table. I see the outer edge of the sliding table is quite noticible below the level of the cast iron table. It might be this can be adjusted so both tables are perfectly level with each other. If not I can see problems, like raising cabinet door panel, using the sliding table?
" I recently bought this via DM Tools who then order from you. Last couple of days I've been assembling it.
I have the cast iron table on now. I used a precision straightedge to check the table for flatness,diagonal corner to corner.
One diagonal is spot on for flatness. However the other diagonal I can get a feeler gauge under the straightedge, 0.8, 0.7 and 0.6mm. Greatest being near the hole in the table. Is this discrepancy normal, acceptable within tolerance?
Thanks.
Record Power support reply,
" Thank you for your email dated 13th August 2018.
I was concerned to hear of the issue raised in your email, Please could you supply a photo of the issue you have encountered with your router table. Also does this affect the work that is being produced on the router table.
Thank you for taking the time in contacting us.
Kind regards
 

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I have that same table from MLCS, it is a generic brand table built offshore and branded by different tool houses.

I have never checked the table for flatness, I love that router table. I had to revise some things I didn't like. Threw the fence and hold downs away, and installed a lift for the Bosch 1617 router.

Herb
 

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"Router table now within specification" What is the specification for flatness of that router table? Any router table? I doubt that mine is flat within 0.5mm or less across the entire surface. Consider how much that would affect a cut. If the profile being cut rises or falls 0.05mm, will that be detectable by anyone but you? Will normal seasonal variations in the dimension of the wood be larger than that?
 

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"Router table now within specification" What is the specification for flatness of that router table? Any router table? I doubt that mine is flat within 0.5mm or less across the entire surface. Consider how much that would affect a cut. If the profile being cut rises or falls 0.05mm, will that be detectable by anyone but you? Will normal seasonal variations in the dimension of the wood be larger than that?
Charles,you are right, how close is freehand routing,only as close as the edge of the board. It is more important to check the straightness of the fence, that is where unevenness rears it nasty head.
@Giai
I haven't checked to see if the slider can be raised or lowered to match the cast iron bed, that would be worth the time and effort.

If you check the fence that came w/table, you will find it is a crude affair at best,and will require some effort to make it minimally accurate.

Herb
 

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Paul
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I never measured the problem but I used to have a slightly saggy plate (1/4 inch cast acrylic with a light router). The inaccuracy wasn't noticeable on shorter pieces but when routing longer pieces, the ends were routed noticeably further into the material than the middle. I think that the error might be magnified some, depending where and in what direction it is. I'd rather have the table slightly proud near the bit than the other way around. The same would go for the fence, if it's slightly bowed back near the bit.

How much is too much? I guess when it's visible in your work. Test it with a chamfer on a straight, stiff piece as long as the table is wide. See if the chamfer's width is noticeably inconsistent.
 

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Mike
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I think I would be more concerned with the sliding table being lower than the cast Iron table. Of course this can probably be shimmed to correct that error.

I would do the test Paul is talking about, just make sure the test board is a little longer than the table so you get the entire impact of the results. Also remember you will be sanding the project and causing small inconsistencies on the edges.
 
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I've just bought a Record Power RPMS-R/MK2 router table.
https://www.dm-tools.co.uk/product.php/section/4581/sn/RPWRPMSR#.W3SMKc5KjIU
I contacted Record Power custumer service see below.
" I can get a feeler gauge under the straightedge, 0.8, 0.7 and 0.6mm. "

What do forum members say,would this gap affect the accuracy of the router table in any relavent way? Also using the same precision straightedge. I laid the edge across the cast iron table on both sides, going over the aluminium sliding table. I see the outer edge of the sliding table is quite noticible below the level of the cast iron table. It might be this can be adjusted so both tables are perfectly level with each other. If not I can see problems, like raising cabinet door panel, using the sliding table?
" I recently bought this via DM Tools who then order from you. Last couple of days I've been assembling it.
I have the cast iron table on now. I used a precision straightedge to check the table for flatness,diagonal corner to corner.
One diagonal is spot on for flatness. However the other diagonal I can get a feeler gauge under the straightedge, 0.8, 0.7 and 0.6mm. Greatest being near the hole in the table. Is this discrepancy normal, acceptable within tolerance?
Thanks.
Record Power support reply,
" Thank you for your email dated 13th August 2018.
I was concerned to hear of the issue raised in your email, Please could you supply a photo of the issue you have encountered with your router table. Also does this affect the work that is being produced on the router table.
Thank you for taking the time in contacting us.
Kind regards
Peter, I have what is almost certainly the same table which is sold around the world under numerous names. I just checked mine and could not get any feeler gauge under it, however, I don't believe for one moment that yours will affect any of your work, after all, as has been mentioned, wood moves with the weather.
This shot was taken a long time ago, the test I just did was using a steel straight edge.
 

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Lee Valley used to build a steel table top. It purposely had a few thousandths rise to center. No matter how heavy the router the table will not dish. The convex shape is not a problem the wood will be level at the bit. A concave surface is bad. A long piece will bridge across the higher outside edges but the ends will start dropping as the piece approaches the center of the table.
 
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If a feeler gauge goes in under the straight edge, that suggests it is concave. And it is flat on one diagonal, not on the other suggest a little warpage, coming close to a mm is more than I'd want to deal with when dealing with tongues and grooves (such as a panel door). Will they replace it with a flatter table? If so, I would request a swap and ask them to check for flatness before shipping it.

That model is clearly produced in a hurry by relatively unskilled workers with cursory QC. Bet fewer than one in 50 get a flatness test, and that with large tolerances allowed.
 

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I never measured the problem but I used to have a slightly saggy plate (1/4 inch cast acrylic with a light router). The inaccuracy wasn't noticeable on shorter pieces but when routing longer pieces, the ends were routed noticeably further into the material than the middle. I think that the error might be magnified some, depending where and in what direction it is. I'd rather have the table slightly proud near the bit than the other way around. The same would go for the fence, if it's slightly bowed back near the bit.

How much is too much? I guess when it's visible in your work. Test it with a chamfer on a straight, stiff piece as long as the table is wide. See if the chamfer's width is noticeably inconsistent.
Many thanks for your note. Have a nice day.
 
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