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First thanks for all the great info here in the site. Finally got a full size router and now I'm going to build a table.
I see some people use an adjustable fence to move based on bit size. Is this just to give the piece as much support around the bit? I know on my saws I've made zero clearance inserts but didn't think this would apply to a router.

I got some acrylic to make an insert, but realized I'm not sure how to cut/drill the large hole for the bit. I don't have forstner bits and didn't think my spade bits would work. Hole saw? Start with a regular drill bit and then use the router to make the hole larger? Thought a flush trim bit might work with the routers base as a template?

Also got some t track for the fence. With two rails, does the fence usually stay square, or does one side get further forward/back? Need to check before routing?

Thanks again for all the help and inspiration!
 

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John
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Hello and welcome to the router forum
 

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Welcome N/A to the forums...

have you visited this sub forum???....
many of question are answered there w/ a zillion ideas...

ROUTER TABLES
there's more here at this link on RT's than you'll be able to digest at one sit down (or many)...

as far as the fence being square to the bit, the bit is round so in reality square is just a figure of speech...

the acrylic, is it for a ZC insert to the table, as a router plate or a ZC insert on the fence, both, all three???... you'll find it's brittle, nick sensitive and not really the best overall choice... (see the PDF's)...
the hole... let's cover that when we know what your exact plans are...

have you considered your dust collection???...

DUST COLLECTION

There is some information on dust collection w/ your health in mind at this here link if you need it...

and just in case you want more...

We've put some helpful information together at this here link to help you get up and running in the world of routers... We hope it's very useful to you... Enjoy...
Do take some time and read the safety PDF's... PLEASE!!!
Blood and trips to the ER, we find, are very annoying... Not to mention – expensive...
 

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First thanks for all the great info here in the site. Finally got a full size router and now I'm going to build a table.
I see some people use an adjustable fence to move based on bit size. Is this just to give the piece as much support around the bit? I know on my saws I've made zero clearance inserts but didn't think this would apply to a router. The sliding fences serve a couple of purposes...when using above the table dust collection in the fence, adjusting to fit the bit will provide better air flow. You can also use the sliding fences for jointing an edge by putting a spacer behind the outfeed side......

I got some acrylic to make an insert, but realized I'm not sure how to cut/drill the large hole for the bit. I don't have forstner bits and didn't think my spade bits would work. Hole saw? Start with a regular drill bit and then use the router to make the hole larger? Thought a flush trim bit might work with the routers base as a template?...not a bad idea but you will need some form of template or a way to cut so that you can add insert rings...

Also got some t track for the fence. With two rails, does the fence usually stay square, or does one side get further forward/back? Need to check before routing? The fence does not need to be square when routing...the bit will always see a straight line and will cut from any angle the workpiece is pushed through it...

Thanks again for all the help and inspiration!
...and welcome to the Forum...
 

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Welcome, glad you joined the fun.

The fence you're speaking of is called a split fence, usually you try to keep the opening as narrow as possible so t eworkpiece is supported well. The drawing shows how to build one. Assuming you have a table saw, you will make the supports to secure the main fence ao the fence is held 90 degrees to the base. Hint: make CERTAIN the saw blade is exactly 90 degrees to the table. The split fence is two pieces that move in slots and is secured at the back with star knobs.

You also want to add a dust collection port behind the fence. Zero clearance doesn't apply to router fences. To prevent tearout, I keep nice, square pieces of MDF around to push pieces through so as the bit exits the workpiece, it goes into the mdf.

When you make your fence, also consider making it at lease 6-8 inches tall. A tall fence is a really handy thing when you are cutting the end of a board, when making a panel door for instance.

Notice on some images that a T track has been added to the fence front. This allows you to use featherboards to handle keeping your workpiece from climbing and ruining your cut. I also added a picture of a safety cover that goes on the front of the fence, and a commercial dust collection port available from any woodworking supply.

Hope this helps.
 

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I feel that the adjustable fences make me feel safer just as using insert rings in the insert plate does. That may be unfounded but it makes me feel better. Close fitting fences and insert rings do help eliminate the possibility of tipping the trailing end inward or downward when applying too much pressure on the work piece. The close fences can also make a difference when running the end of a stile past the bit when making doors.

You can drill the hole in the insert plate with a hole saw run at a relatively slow speed to avoid melting the plastic but machining a rabbet in the plate so you can fit insert rings is trickier. A few years ago Grizzly tools was selling insert plates with one ring for $13. They've probably gone up a bit but may still be cheaper and more functional than trying to make your own. It was hard to find in their catalog so you might have to phone them to order it.
 
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